May 13

May 13, Mets’ Lineup At Rockies

Matt Harvey is coming off his best start of the season and will attempt to start the Mets on another winning streak tonight in Denver against the Rockies.

Tonight will be Harvey’s first career start at Coors Field. You might recall he was scratched from last year’s start by Logan Verrett. The Mets enter with an 11-game winning streak against the Rockies.

Here’s the Mets batting order:

Curtis Granderson, RF

David Wright, 3B

Michael Conforto, LF

Yoenis Cespedes, CF

Lucas Duda, 1B

Neil Walker, 2B

Asdrubal Cabrera, SS

Kevin Plawecki, C

Harvey, RP

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May 13

Mets Wrap: Kershaw Dominates

KERSHAW: The best. (AP)

KERSHAW: The best. (AP)

The future is promising for the Mets’ core of young arms. If any of them can approach what the Dodgers’ Clayton Kershaw has done, they also can be called special.

Kershaw, making his 250th career start, struck out 13 Mets and gave up just three hits in Thursday night’s 5-0 blanking of the Mets.

Kershaw, now 5-1, has posted double-digit strikeouts in his last five starts. Just as important as strikeouts, if not even more vital, is he’s only walked four hitters all season.

“Walking guys is how you get in trouble,” Kershaw told reporters. “I’d rather string hits together and make them swing the bats to beat me. That’s always my mentality.

“`Fortunately, I feel like my mechanics have felt pretty solid the whole season and I’m able to repeat pitches pretty consistently.”

After watching Kershaw, one could only hope Matt Harvey – Friday’s starter in Colorado – was taking notes.

METS GAME WRAP

Game: #34   Record: 21-13   Streak: L 1

Standings: Tied First, NL East

Runs: 137     Average per game: 4.3    Times scoring 3 runs or less: 14

SUMMARY:  Kershaw struck out 13 and gave up three hits, and the Dodgers scored five runs in the first two innings and coasted from there. The Mets never had as many as two runners on base in any inning.

KEY MOMENT:  For all practical purposes, the game was over with Yasmani Grandal’s three-run homer in the first.

THUMBS UP:  Two hits by Asdrubal Cabrera and a double by Curtis Granderson accounted for the offense. … Three shutout innings with three strikeouts by Sean Gilmartin.

THUMBS DOWN:  Thirteen strikeouts. … Bartolo Colon gave up five runs in five innings. … Chase Utley homered.

EXTRA INNINGS:  Wilmer Flores (hamstring) was placed on the disabled list. … Utley is 10-for-20 with a homer lifetime against Colon.

QUOTEBOOK:  “He never gives in. He doesn’t have to stay in the zone to get you out. He’s so dominant.’’ – Mets manager Terry Collins on Kershaw.

BY THE NUMBERS: 4: Times Mets have been shutout this year.

NEXT FOR METS: Harvey starts Friday at Colorado.

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May 08

Mets Wrap: Colon Hits, Pitches Team To Win

METS GAME WRAP

Game: #29    May 7: at San Diego    Score: Mets 6, Padres 3

Record: 18-11  Streak: W 1

Standings: Second, NL East .5 GB Nationals  Playoffs Today: First WC vs. Pittsburgh

Runs: 129  Average: 4.5  Times scoring 3 runs or less: 12

ANALYSIS: When you watch enough baseball, eventually you’ll say to yourself, “Now, I’ve seen everything.’’ After Bartolo Colon’s first career homer, maybe we have.

SUMMARY: The Mets crushed four more homers, from Yoenis Cespedes and Colon in the first two innings, and David Wright and Michael Conforto going back-to-back in the ninth. 

KEY MOMENT: How can it be anything but Colon’s drive? It proved to be the margin of difference until the ninth-inning padding.

THUMBS UP: Asdrubal Cabrera made a great catch of a foul ball near the stands, and acknowledged a young fan that tried to congratulate him. I love that stuff. … Cespedes hit a two-run homer in the first. … Three walks, a single and homer from Wright. … Conforto broke a 1-for-17 slide with his homer. … Kevin Plawecki hit two doubles.

THUMBS DOWN: Colon homers. How can there be any negative?

EXTRA INNINGS:  The cooled-off Conforto and Neil Walker were in their customary third-and-sixth slots in the batting order. … Walker is on a 0-for-18 slide. … Travis d’Arnaud‘s shoulder still hurts and his time on the DL will be extended.

QUOTEBOOK:  “You’re so happy for him. He’s such a pro. … It was really cool to see it happen.’’ – Collins on Colon’s homer.

BY THE NUMBERS: 6: Time Mets have hit back-to-back homers this year.

NEXT FOR METS: Matt Harvey starts Sunday.

May 07

Colon One Of A Kind

Bartolo Colon swings hard, so you figured if he ever caught a pitch just right it might go out. Well, it finally happened in the second inning Saturday night when Colon, 17 days shy of his 43rd birthday, connected against James Shields in the 226th at-bat of his career.

This wasn’t a “run for the roses,’’ as much as it was a 31-second jog around the bases, long enough for the Mets to vacate the bench, fans back home to text their friends with a “you’ll never believe what just happened,” message, and researchers to discover he became the oldest player to hit his first career homer.

Colon’s blast – and he did crush it – was one of four the Mets hit on the night. Yoenis Cespedes hit the first in the first inning, and David Wright and Michael Conforto went back-to-back in the ninth as the Mets regained their power stroke to beat the Padres, 6-3, and Colon won the 221st game of his splendid career.

COLON: One of a kind. (GETTY)

COLON: One of a kind. (GETTY)

Incidentally, the Mets also have the oldest player ever to hit a homer in Julio Franco at 47.

This is Colon’s third year with the Mets. He was originally signed to pick up the innings void when Matt Harvey underwent Tommy John surgery. Colon won 15 and 14 games, respectively, in his first two years and worked over 190 innings each time.

Colon won over the hearts of Mets’ fans, not to mention his teammates, with his work ethic and outwardly unashamed signs of enjoying himself on the field. Colon also won everybody’s respect last year when he volunteered to pitch out of the bullpen during the playoffs.

Colon’s behind-the-back flip to first base last year in MIami was a sense of comic relief, but Saturday’s homer came at a time when the struggling Mets’ offense most needed a jolt.

However, the Mets didn’t get Colon to rake. They got him to pitch, and once again he came up with a quality outing, giving up three runs in 6.2 innings with five strikeouts. It marked the fourth time in six starts this year Colon (3-1) has gone at least six innings, and the 50th time in 68 starts with the Mets he’s gone that far.

Those, however, are numbers. He means far more than stats to this franchise. To watch his teammates mob him in the dugout, to hear how they love to tease him and enjoy his company, is a reflection how much they like and admire him. That’s a sign of respect not many players get to enjoy.

Colon has been a joy to watch during his short time here. He’ll go down as one of the most beloved Mets.

 

May 04

If Issue Is 2015 Innings, Harvey Deserves Responsibility

I couldn’t help but laugh after hearing Terry Collins last night talking about Matt Harvey’s problems.

Collins, who admitted the Mets don’t have a real answer as to Harvey’s mechanical issues, but threw out it could be “one of those years where it’s due to all of the innings last year, we’re going to see the effects of it.’’

HARVEY: Must accept responsibility. (ESPN).

HARVEY: Must accept responsibility. (ESPN).

Apparently, one of the effects is a loss of memory, at least by Collins.

If we can rewind a moment to the end of last spring training, I wrote how the Mets needed to come up with a definitive innings plan for Harvey and offered a couple of suggestions, none of which they adopted.

Instead, GM Sandy Alderson – echoed by Collins – a “fly by the seat of his pants,’’ approach. Their approach was to acquiesce to Harvey’s whims, from where to do his rehab and delaying when to have surgery.

I made a big deal about this at the time how important it was to have a concrete plan, which included limiting his innings in blowout games, skipping occasional starts, and definitely pulling him out of games in which he was hurting or ill.

Do you remember the start against the Yankees when he insisted on going after a complete game shutout when he had a huge lead?

And, don’t tell me you’ve forgotten the strep throat game when he wanted to pitch and Collins gave in when the smart thing would’ve have been to skip him.

Then, fast-forward to late August when agent Scott Boras leaked out the limit was 180 innings. Harvey first said he would follow his agent, then after the backlash against him he said wanted to pitch.

This made everybody connected with the Mets look bad.

Neither Alderson nor Collins had the backbone to stand up to Harvey, which ultimately brings us to the ninth inning of Game 5.

Harvey threw 216 innings last year – 36 more than Boras’ number. I estimated skipping one start a month would have saved Harvey at least that number, and even more if they pulled him early from blowout games.

So now, Collins is telling us Harvey threw too many innings in 2015. Well, whose fault is that? If Collins stood up to Harvey, this wouldn’t be an issue.

Now, we learn Harvey was ill before he pitched Tuesday night. Didn’t Collins learn anything from last year?

Obviously not.