Mar 06

Harvey’s First Inning … Perfect

Matt Harvey struck out the first hitter he faced Anthony Gose. Got the second, Jose Iglesias, on a one-bouncer back to the mound and the third, Rajai Davis, grounded out to first.

It was an easy inning as he threw only 10 pitches. Ron Darling said Harvey was stepping on the gas, which Keith Hernandez confirmed, saying he was at 96. It is important to note neither said Harvey was overthrowing as he kept the same compact delivery he always had.

 

Mar 06

March 6, Mets-Tigers Lineups

Here are the starting lineups for today’s game with Detroit, which will be telecast on SNY.

New York Mets

Juan Lagares, cf

Curtis Granderson, rf

David Wright, 3b

Daniel Murphy, 2b

Travis d’Arnaud, c

Wilmer Flores, ss

Anthony Recker, dh

Matt Harvey, p

 

Detroit Tigers

Anthony Gose, cf

Jose Iglesias, ss

Rajai Davis, lf

Nick Castellanos, 3b

Jordan Lennerton, 1b

Bryan Holaday, c

Daniel Fields, dh

Andrew Romine, 2b

Xavier Avery, rf

David Price, p

 

Mar 06

Harvey Gets The Ball

While it is cold and snowy in New York, but today marks the real start of baseball season because Matt Harvey will make his first appearance in a game since Aug. 24, 2013.

He walked off that game against Detroit with pain in is right elbow that two months later required Tommy John surgery. By coincidence, he’s facing the Tigers again Friday.

HARVEY: All eyes on him today. (AP)

HARVEY: All eyes on him today. (AP)

Harvey blew a lot of smoke leading up to this start, telling reporters: “I’m looking at it as getting ready for a season. I’m not really putting any extra pressure on that there isn’t anyway. I’m looking at it as getting work done and preparing for a season like nothing has ever happened.’’

LOL. That’s rich. A quick show of hands please. How many actually believe that? Thought so …

Harvey isn’t fooling anybody. He literally begged the Mets to pitch last season, but GM Sandy Alderson held the course, which was the right thing to do.

Harvey is scheduled to throw 35 pitches over two innings – 40 tops – and it wouldn’t be natural if the adrenalin weren’t flowing full course. He’s as anxious as anybody to find out about his elbow.

Even pitching coach Dan Warthen anticipates Harvey’s competitive nature – which makes him a special prospect – to surface. It’s unavoidable, he said: “There’s no way you’re ever going to dial Matt down. It’s competition. He’s going to do everything he can to get that person out. So he’s not going to dial it down.’’

While the Mets have been pointing to Harvey’s return as the driving force for their drive to the playoffs, let’s be sure about one thing, and that is he is still a prospect with only 36 career starts, 178.1 innings and just 12 victories.

In the grand scheme of things, that’s not even one full season.

But, there’s a lot of pressure and angst tied into this start.

It’s only natural.

 

Mar 04

Mets Today: Showcasing Gee

Let the showcasing begin for the Mets and Dillon Gee, whom they have been trying to trade since the end of last season. Gee will start today against Atlanta in the Mets’ exhibition opener, with the parameters being 35 pitches or two innings.

Gee, who threw 199 innings two years ago, regressed last season and was 7-8 with a 4.00 ERA. He’s expendable with the return of Matt Harvey following elbow surgery.

GEE: Being showcased this spring. (AP)

GEE: Being showcased this spring. (AP)

The Mets tried to trade Gee this off-season, but found little interest, probably because of their high asking price. After the winter meetings they indicated a willingness to accept a low-level prospect, but GM Sandy Alderson said the market is currently dry.

“I think most clubs, including ours, are focused on what’s going on in camp and evaluating what they already have,’’ Alderson told reporters in Port St. Lucie. “If there’s going to be any significant trade talk, I think typically it’s going to happen later in spring training, unless there’s an injury of some sort. By and large, I think that comes more in the second half of spring training.’’

Assuming no injuries in the rotation, Gee is the sixth starter, which puts him on the outside, or more to the point, in the bullpen as a long reliever. Because each starter has a significant question next to his name, it makes sense to hold onto Gee, who has been productive. The Mets won’t trade Gee just for the sake of making a deal.

From his point, Gee likes it here and wants to stay.

“I’m happy to be here. I really am,’’ Gee said at the start of camp. “Right now, I’m approaching this like I’m pitching to be a starter. That’s what they’ve told me to do. I love starting, and I’ve been successful as a starter.’’

But, that’s not his choice.