Jun 28

Harvey Needs To Pitch Bigger Than His Ego

Readers of this blog know I have been critical of Matt Harvey and this “Dark Knight” and “Today is Harvey Day” nonsense. It comes with a gut feeling he’s been seduced by the trappings of being a “New York Sports Star” and being a celebrity is what drives him.

HARVEY: Needs to pitch bigger than his ego. (AP)

HARVEY: Needs to pitch bigger than his ego. (AP)

However, with a 29-27 career record, can he really be considered a star?  He’s more celebrity than star. More smoke than fire. More sizzle than steak. Perhaps a Kardashian in cleats. I could go all day, but the bottom line is for a variety of reasons ranging from injuries to poor performance to a mental block, he hasn’t developed into what we think he could be. Or, maybe what he should be.

Two games over .500 is not a big deal, and never mind the new wave stats: wins and losses are important.

Harvey craves the attention and spotlight. The Mets have tread water the last two months, but with a grueling schedule entering the All-Star break they face the real possibility of falling into a downward spiral. Yes, there is such a thing as a “must win” game in June.

Monday night might have produced their worst performance of the season in an 11-4 trouncing to the Nationals. They are in third place in the NL East and would fall five games back with a loss Tuesday night. From a team perspective, a case can be made tonight is one of Harvey’s most important starts. The Mets desperately need not only a victory, but a stellar performance from the pitcher they still consider an ace.

If Harvey gets torched tonight, and with the prospect of not having Steven Matz on Wednesday, the party that is 2016 could soon be over. It’s quite simple, Harvey needs to pitch bigger than his ego.

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Jun 27

Mets Wrap: Blitzed By Nationals

Manager Terry Collins said this was the start of an important two-week stretch for the Mets and they better bring their “A’’ game to the table. Can you imagine what would have happened had they not thought it was important?

Whatever d'Arnaud told him it didn't work. (AP)

Whatever d’Arnaud told him it didn’t work. (AP)

I’m being sarcastic, which is the best way to handle a game like the Mets’ 11-4 loss at Washington.

Noah Syndergaard started despite having a barking elbow from his previous game. Syndergaard clearly didn’t have it, giving up five runs on seven hits and three walks in three innings in which he threw a grueling 71 pitches.

Syndergaard imploded in a five-run third, and again couldn’t hold runners as the Nationals stole five bases against him.

Collins said Syndergaard’s elbow wasn’t an issue. Syndergaard refuted multiple media reports he had a bone spur or bone chips in his elbow.


June 27, 2016, @ Washington

Game: #75          Score:  Nationals 11, Mets 4

Record: 40-35     Streak: L 2

Standings: Third, NL East, four games behind Washington.

Runs: 274    Average: 3.65     Times 3 runs or less: 37

SUMMARY: It unraveled for Syndergaard in a five-run third in which the Nationals stole four bases. It would have been worse had Bryce Harper not had a brain cramp on the bases.

KEY MOMENT:  Anthony Rendon’s two-run single to right in the third completely erased the Mets’ 4-0 lead. You knew it was over then.

THUMBS UP: The Mets had 14 hits, getting two each from Curtis Granderson, Yoenis Cespedes, Wilmer Flores and Brandon Nimmo. Travis d’Arnaud had three hits.

THUMBS DOWN:  The Mets had 14 hits, but scored only four runs. … Syndergaard was all over the place with three walks. … Rumor had it Rene Rivera was to catch Syndergaard to but the brakes on the opponent’s running game. … Reliever Sean Gilmartin gave up five runs on seven hits in two innings.

EXTRA INNINGS:  The Mets began a stretch of playing 11 of 14 games against first-place teams. … The Mets are now 16-16 vs. NL East teams. … The Mets are 11-13 in June.

QUOTEBOOK: “[Syndergaard] threw almost 40 pitches in the third and that was enough. … His velocity was good but his command was off.” – Collins on Syndergaard’s performance. 

BY THE NUMBERS:  6: Stolen bases by the Nationals. Overall, opposing runners have stolen 28 bases in 31 attempts against Syndergaard.

NEXT FOR METS: Matt Harvey will try to get back on track after two mediocre outings.

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Jun 23

Mets Should Break Out Kid Gloves With Syndergaard

Just because the Mets received positive news with Noah Syndergaard doesn’t mean they should press their luck. Syndergaard was pulled from Wednesday’s game with tightness in his pitching elbow, news testily blurted out by clearly irritated manager Terry Collins.

SYNDERGAARD: Be careful with him. (AP)

SYNDERGAARD: Be careful with him. (AP)

A MRI at the Hospital of Special Surgery showed no structural damage, but the Mets aren’t saying his availability for Monday in Washington. Why is this even a question, similar to him pitching in the All-Star Game?

He threw a season-high 115 pitches in his previous start and his pitch-count in comparison to innings worked has been relatively high this season. The prudent thing would be to skip Monday to keep him fresh for the Cubs.

Is this a knee-jerk reaction? I don’t think so, considering this is the second time this season he’s been examined for elbow tightness. There’s nothing to be gained by pushing the envelope. It is better to miss a start now than possibly miss a lot of starts in the second half.

As for the All-Star Game? Sure it’s a big deal for him personally, but it was also a big thing for Matt Harvey in 2013 when he insisted on pitching – with the team’s blessing – after complaining of a tight forearm. Does anybody need to be reminded of what happened?

As for Yoenis Cespedes, well, he has a mild sprain of his left wrist that required a cortisone injection. He’ll miss a few days, but should miss the disabled list. Zack Wheeler was also examined and diagnosed with sensory nerve irritation in his elbow. He also took a cortisone injection and will resume throwing when he’s able.

It was a scary day on the injury front for the Mets, but they received the best news possible. They were lucky, but hopefully they’ll be smart enough not to push their luck with Syndergaard. Time to walk away from the table now and regroup for later.

Jun 20

Not A Fan Of Demoting Conforto

It’s a good thing the Mets are off Monday because playing games doesn’t seem to be good idea. Citi Field is quiet today, except for the buzz in manager Terry Collins‘ office, where he is presumably huddling with GM Sandy Alderson and his coaching staff about what to do next. At the top of the list is the decision whether to demote Michael Conforto in Triple-A Las Vegas to work on the swing that deserted him.

CONFORTO: Not of fan of demoting him. (AP)

CONFORTO: Not of fan of demoting him. (AP)

Most likely the corresponding move would be promoting Brandon Nimmo. As much as I’d like to see Nimmo – much the way I wanted to see Conforto last year – I’m not a big proponent about this move. Not yet, anyway.

I realize that’s contradictory considering I advocated sending down Matt Harvey and Ike Davis. However, these circumstances are different. With Davis, he resisted changing or his style, and had been with the Mets long enough for them to believe nothing would change. With Harvey, he was coming off

Davis resisted changing his style and had been with the Mets long enough for them to believe nothing would change. Harvey was coming off Tommy John surgery and injuries are always more complex.

Conforto doesn’t fit into any of these boxes. For one, he’s been bothered by a sore wrist, but nothing to where he needs to go on the disabled list. If he is hurt, then why is he playing? Also, reports are unlike Davis he’s very coachable and is tenure with the Mets has been short.

Willie Mays and Mickey Mantle all went down to the minors, so nobody should be immune. However, I don’t see where a Conforto for Nimmo swap is a good thing. If Conforto goes down and regains his stroke and is brought up in two weeks, what becomes of Nimmo? Theoretically, they would simply send him back down, but how does that help anybody?

If Nimmo is hitting, wouldn’t they want to keep him up here? If so, where would he play? He certainly wouldn’t replace Yoenis Cespedes or Curtis Granderson, and as is the case with most young players the Mets wouldn’t want him to ride the bench.

Conforto isn’t hitting, but neither is anybody else. I would keep Conforto on the major league level and give him an opportunity to work things out with the Mets.

Jun 15

Surgery Might Be Wright’s Best Chance

Like everybody else, I want to see David Wright be healthy and productive for the Mets. But it won’t happen this year and there are no guarantees about the future. Wright is currently mulling over the possibility of season-ending neck surgery with Dr. Robert Watkins. Should he have it, there are no assurances of when he’ll be ready for the 2017 season.

WRIGHT: What will he do? (AP)

WRIGHT: What will he do? (AP)

Far be it for me, or anybody else for that matter, to tell somebody to have surgery, especially in an area as vital as the neck. As I found out with my surgery in 2014 for a broken arm that backfired and caused me to be hospitalized for six months and leave in a wheelchair, stuff happens.

However, Wright’s case it is far more complicated than a broken arm. What we do know is there are no guarantees with rest and rehabilitation, either. If he goes that route, comes back and is reinjured to where surgery is a must, then not only this season, but perhaps much of next year will be gone, too.

Matt Harvey faced the same dilemma in 2013 before relenting and taking the Tommy John.

Wright is 33. He was diagnosed with spinal stenosis last year and was out for nearly four months. He’s currently on the disabled list with a herniated disk in his neck. He was off to a sluggish start – seven homers with 14 RBI – when he was injured. He was also having a rough time in the field, most notably his throwing.

Wilmer Flores is currently the third baseman and hitting well since taking over. Eric Campbell and Ty Kelly also spent time at third.

The Mets’ offense has been non-productive for nearly six weeks, averaging less than four runs a game. There’s no immediate help in the future from the minor leagues or in a possible trade. Mike Schmidt isn’t walking through that door.

I want to see Wright play, but I would rather he be healthy. That’s why I would opt for the surgery.