Mar 04

Mets Wrap: Mets Beat Houston, 6-2; Wheeler Sharp; Granderson Homers Twice; MLBPA In Camp

The New York Mets won again today, beating the Houston Astros, 6-2, behind three strong innings from Zack Wheeler and two homers from Curtis Granderson.

Wheeler was scheduled to pitch two innings, but went out for a third because his pitch count was low. His best pitch was a sharp cutter.

“It was terrible in the bullpen,’’ Wheeler said. “I was worried about it, but I turned it around in the game.’’

Wheeler said it is night-and-day between this spring training and last year.

“I feel a little more comfortable,’’ he said. “I can relax and get my job done.’’

Wheeler threw a high of 96 mph., and held the Astros to two hits with three strikeouts while throwing 40 pitches.

Granderson was GM Sandy Alderson’s marquee signing over the winter. He’s slated to hit clean-up and protect David Wright in the order.

Conventional wisdom is he won’t hit for the same power he did at Yankee Stadium, but there was nothing cheap about either homer.

Granderson’s power last year was sapped because of two hand injuries, but he whipped the bat through the hitting zone and drove each ball.

In addition:

* Reliever Vic Black struggled with his command as he threw 34 pitches in one inning, and walked the bases loaded in the seventh.

* New Players Association chief Tony Clark was in camp to meet the players. In the MLBPA’s annual sabre rattling, Clark said the union would monitor the club’s spending. Currently, the Mets’ projected payroll entering the season is the seventh lowest in the major leagues. Reportedly, the team’s current loan has payroll restraints written into the terms by the lenders. The Mets dispute that language. Clark said the union is not consulted by clubs on the specifics of their loans.

* Eric Young started for the first time this spring and reached base twice. He had been sidelined with a tight side muscle.

* First basemen Ike Davis (calves) and Lucas Duda (legs), and infielders Ruben Tejada and Wilfredo Tovar (hamstrings) did not play.

* Matt Harvey long-tossed for the second straight day. His program consists of 20 throws at 60 feet on Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays.

* Collins indicated David Wright and Daniel Murphy should play by the end of the week. Both had side-muscle problems in previous springs and are being eased into the games.

* Jeremy Hefner, who like Harvey is recovering from Tommy John surgery, started the same program.

* Former Met Johan Santana signed a minor league deal with Baltimore. (See earlier post today).

 

Mar 03

Mets Wrap: Syndergaard Impressive; Davis Scratched; Piazza In Camp

New York Mets prospect Noah Syndergaard threw two scoreless innings this afternoon in a 6-2 victory over Atlanta. Manager Terry Collins called it a “big test’’ as Syndergaard gave up one hit in his 30-pitch audition that included a three-pitch punch out of Evan Gattis.

“You’re not in Kansas anymore,’’ Collins told reporters of Syndergaard’s performance. “You’re where the big guys play. I thought he handled it great. You don’t see a lot of people throw three fastballs by Gattis. That won’t happen very much. He just made pitches he had to make.

“He’s a big, tough kid. He’s got all the traits of the good ones. He takes stuff seriously. He’s not joking around. He didn’t joke around even after he came out of the game. … There are certainly some things we’ve got to get him to do better. But, right now, he’s on track to be special.’’

That’s not to be interpreted to mean Syndergaard will open the season on the Opening Day roster. Syndergaard worked on an innings count last season at Double-A Binghamton, and projections are he will start the year at Triple-A Las Vegas.

In addition:

* First baseman Lucas Duda left the game with leg stiffness and is day-to-day.

* First baseman Ike Davis was pulled from the lineup with a tight calf. He is expected to play Tuesday.

* Former Mets catcher Mike Piazza, 45, is in camp this week as a guest instructor. Jeff Wilpon invited him last September when he was inducted into the club’s Hall of Fame. “For me it’s very rewarding to coach and to try to help a little bit,’’ Piazza said.

* Shortstop Ruben Tejada did not play because of a tight left hamstring, but is expected to play Tuesday.

* Jonathon Niese said his left shoulder felt good after throwing in the bullpen Monday afternoon. Niese is scratched from tomorrow’s start. He is expected to throw again Thursday, but does not have a date set in which he will start.

* Major League Baseball’s new instant replay format will be tested at Tradition Field, March 7, 15, 18 and 23.

* Matt Harvey long-tossed this morning. He’s still a long way from the mound.

 

Mar 03

Mets’ Harvey Gets Valuable Advice From Strasburg

Shelved New York Mets pitcher Matt Harvey has received unsolicited, yet valuable advice, from the opposition. First Roy Halladay, prior to his retirement this winter, spoke with him on whether to undergo Tommy John surgery.

STRASBURG: Advises Harvey (AP)

STRASBURG: Advises Harvey (AP)

Now, Washington Nationals ace Stephen Strasburg, through an interesting column by The New York Post’s Kevin Kernan, counseled him on his rehab. Strasburg, who blew out his elbow in his 2010 rookie season, advised him on the slow rehab process. Strasburg, who shares the same agent as Harvey in Scott Boras, also volunteered to speak with him.

Strasburg said it is a long, slow process, and the idea of taking things day-to-day isn’t always the best method as it can get frustrating.

“You’ll feel great one day, and the next day it’s terrible,’’ Strasburg said. “The best advice I got was, `Look where you were at the start of the month and then at the end of the month. Don’t look at where you were yesterday.’ ’’

It’s kind of like dieting in that stepping on the scale every morning can drive you crazy. There will be setbacks, whether it is a donut or a little tightness one morning.

Veteran pitchers know their bodies, while Harvey is just learning how his responds to pain and injury. There were times Harvey eschewed talking to the trainers last summer when he felt discomfort. Perhaps, this was overestimating his recuperative powers.

“It’s a different beat,’’ Strasburg said about the differences between rehabbing and training. “Recovery is huge, once you learn how long it takes for your body to recover and how often you need to let your body relax and just get back to full health.

“That’s when you can really accomplish the durable things that pitchers do.’’

The Mets suggested it, but haven’t put Harvey not coming back this season in stone. That might be a prudent thing to do because it takes away the carrot of possibly pitching in late September. Harvey long-tossed this morning and doesn’t have a date when he’ll throw off the mound.

This is part of the problem. What date will Harvey throw from the mound? When will he pitch batting practice?

Just say no, and leave 2015 as the target date, not late this summer.

 

Feb 27

Syndergaard Stars In Intrasquad Game; Mets Shouldn’t Get Carried Away

The cheers were great, the performance was scintillating, but the New York Mets – and their often-frustrated fan base – shouldn’t get carried away and read too much into Noah Syndergaard’s performance in Thursday’s intrasquad game.

SYNDERGAARD: Big showing. (MLB.com)

SYNDERGAARD: Big showing. (MLB.com)

In Syndergaard’s first performance in the Mets’ camp, Syndergaard, throwing what manager Terry Collins calls “the hook from hell,’’ struck out five in two innings. He also gave up a run on four hits, but with no walks.

Not only was Syndergaard’s curveball working in fall-off-the-table fashion, but his 97 mph., fastball was sizzling.

“I felt pretty good out there. I kind of shocked myself a little bit,’’ Syndergaard told reporters Thursday in Port St. Lucie. “I wasn’t expecting that my first time out there.’’

Nor should the Mets expect that from him in Monday’s start against Atlanta; every time out at Triple-A Las Vegas; or when he finally is brought up in June. He’ll need time to develop into all what is expected of him.

“I didn’t think I was going to get the start, first of all,” Syndergaard said of Monday. “I’m excited, a little nervous at the same time. It’s the first time facing a real big-league lineup. I’m going to go out there and do what I can. It’s still a game. They’re still playing baseball out there.’’

Which is true, but baseball is also a game of emotions. Matt Harvey and Zack Wheeler, despite their youth, have been able to keep their emotions in check. The Mets would like to see the same from Syndergaard.

That will be easier, of course, if he’s throwing that fastball in the upper 90s.

“How can you not like what you saw?’’ Collins said. “For heaven’s sake, I don’t know how hard he threw, but it was firm. Even in a game like this, you better get to the heater, because you don’t want to try to hit that curveball.

“Certainly everything you heard, you saw. You heard, ‘What a great arm.’ You got it. You heard, ‘He’s got a great presence,’ that he pounds the strike zone. He did that.’’

Of course, should Syndergaard cut down the Braves as he did his minor league teammates, there will be rumblings about cracking the rotation.

However, Collins and general manager Sandy Alderson should a turn a deaf ear and continue with the same plan they had last season for Wheeler.

ON DECK: Mets Wrap.

Feb 24

Mets’ Manager Terry Collins Wants Players To Reveal Injuries

Ike Davis isn’t the first New York Met to withhold an injury from manager Terry Collins and won’t be the last.

He’s just the latest, and his recent revelation he concealed an oblique injury last season perplexed and frustrated his manager.

COLLINS: Not pleased with Davis. (AP)

COLLINS: Not pleased with Davis. (AP)

As Davis struggled at the plate, he denied anything was bothered him. On Sunday he opened up to the New York Post and indicated he didn’t report anything to the medical staff because it was about the time he was to be optioned to Triple-A Las Vegas and didn’t want people to think he was making excuses.

Davis admonished the reporter Monday morning, and by the afternoon Collins was in the storm – and not pleased about it.

“There’s got to be a conversation,’’ Collins told reporters in Port St. Lucie. “And then certainly it’s up to me to decide which way to proceed. … As I look back now, everything would have been better off had he said something, and certainly he’ll hopefully learn from it that he needs to speak up.’’

Davis defended his actions, telling The Post, players perform injured all the time and he didn’t want to come off as making excuses. At the time, Davis said he was fine, but clearly something was off.

Collins said it goes beyond pain and discomfort.

“Once again, I can’t address it because I don’t know how bad it was,’’ Collins said. “Was it aggravating? Was there pain? Did it hurt you to swing? Were you trying to protect it coming off the ball? I mean, there’s all sorts of different things. And I certainly don’t have any answers for you.’’

All managers receive a daily report from the training staff on the extent of an injury and whether the player received treatment. If Davis said nothing, then Collins wasn’t given any information.

That this story came out the way it did is embarrassing to Collins and the Mets, an organization that has received its share of criticism on how it treats injuries.

The Mets received heat for how it dealt with injuries to Ryan Church, Carlos Beltran, David Wright, Jose Reyes and Pedro Martinez to name a few.

Last summer, they were embarrassed when the story broke that Matt Harvey wasn’t forthcoming on pain to his forearm, which eventually landed him on the disabled list and under the knife.

There were conflicting reports as to when Collins and the Mets’ hierarchy knew of Harvey’s injury. Collins said he never received a trainer’s report.

Of course we can speculate – and rightfully so – as to whether that lack of disclosure cost Harvey this season.

One understands a player’s desire to perform and help his team, but such intent isn’t always beneficial. Harvey, Davis and the Mets would all have been better off had players reported the injury immediately.

Not doing so shows poor judgment, but it is also something players have done for years, especially young players such as Harvey and struggling ones like Davis. Sometimes fear, and sometimes the competitive juices drown out good judgment.

No, Davis won’t be the last Met to feel something and hold his tongue.

ON DECK: Wrapping the day.