Aug 28

Losing Matt Harvey Not Mets’ Only Issue

Can we please have a reality check in the wake of the New York Mets losing Matt Harvey for the remainder of this season and possibly all of 2014?

In some ways the Mets overachieved this year, but not to the point where they should be considered favorites next summer, or the following one, even with Harvey.

HARVEY: Even with him, Mets have issues.

HARVEY: Even with him, Mets have issues.

The Mets are a flawed team, and considering they just traded their two of their top three home-run and RBI leaders in Marlon Byrd and John Buck, they are even more scarred.

Without Harvey, and with Jenrry Mejia and Jeremy to have surgery, Dillon Gee, Zack Wheeler and Jon Niese are the only givens in next year’s rotation. And, Niese is coming off a slight rotator cuff tear and Wheeler will have only half a season experience on his resume.

It is imperative the Mets go on with the belief Harvey will be out indefinitely and add one or two starters. Please don’t say Daisuke Matsuzaka is enough, and even in jest, don’t suggest bringing back Johan Santana.

The Mets like catcher Travis d’Arnaud’s future, but he’s only played a handful of games. They’ll miss Buck, not only for his bat, but his ability to handle pitchers.

First base has the unappealing options of Ike Davis, Lucas Duda and Josh Satin. There’s also a hole at shortstop, with Ruben Tejada fading into past tense and Omar Quintanilla a reserve.

Second baseman Daniel Murphy could be gone, especially if the Mets opt to go with Wilmer Flores.

Left and center, as of now, appear set with Eric Young and Juan Lagares, with neither having much power. Right field, as it was this spring, is wide open. Maybe they’ll bring back Byrd. Who knows?

The bullpen has pitched well for the most part in the second half, but with Bobby Parnell facing surgery on his neck, it will be patchwork all over again.

General manager Sandy Alderson has been pointing to 2014 since he got here, saying once several bloated contracts were off the books the team will have liberty to spend.

The timetable has been pushed back at least a year with Harvey’s injury, but that’s no excuse for him to sit on his hands this winter. The Mets have at least two winters of spending before they’ll have a competitive team around Harvey and Wheeler.

They must, even if it is just in keeping with the appearances of their 2014 timetable, be aggressive this off-season.

It’s the least they can do considering all the talking they’ve done.

Your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to respond. Follow me on Twitter @jdelcos

Aug 28

Holy UCL Batman! Mets In Trouble Without Matt Harvey!

Matt Harvey might as well play on Twitter because he’s not going to be pitching for the New York Mets any time soon.

Last night, while his teammates outside of Marlon Byrd and John Buck were taking batting practice, Harvey mustered all his strength to tweet: “Thank you everyone for the kind words and support. I may be done this year, but I will be back next year for April 1.’’

HARVEY: More than a bloody nose this time.

HARVEY: More than a bloody nose this time.

Then the Mets, no doubt inspired by this bit of news, went out to win one for Harvey.

I have no doubt Harvey will be back next April Fool’s Day, just not starting a game for the Mets. But, I can’t say that with any more certainty than Harvey can predict he’ll make a triumphant MacAurthuresque return.

“If that’s his tweet, that’s his tweet,’’ said Sandy Alderson, who didn’t immediately call off the off-season.

It’s great to be optimistic, but not to the point of being illogical. There’s just too much information currently not available, such as a second opinion after the swelling subsides, which could be in more than two weeks.

What I can tell you with certainty are the Mets would be foolish if they were to bank on Harvey’s return and making a contending run next season. The Mets must, and I can’t emphasize this enough, go on with life assuming Harvey won’t be in it until 2015 at the earliest.

Gloom and doom? You bet, but you’re Mets’ fans, you should be used to it by now.

As far as what Jon Niese did last night in shutting out the Phillies, it was simply a sign he’s recovering from his shoulder tear. It can’t be assumed Harvey will recover that quickly as every arm is different.

Terry Collins, whom I still can’t believe didn’t know about Harvey’s elbow until a few days ago, was accurate in something he said last night that nobody will feel sorry for the Mets and the final month is about auditioning for 2014 jobs.

I’ve endorsed Collins several times for an extension and believe he should return. However, nothing is a slam dunk in this game and Collins will be watched closely on how he handles this adversity. Harvey’s injury plus the Buck-Byrd trade – which was made for the right reasons – is akin to a punch in the gut. Niese’s game was a start, but wounded teams often show an initial spark.

The issue is if they sustain and return to play the alert, aggressive baseball they were before being swept by the Dodgers. Now, more than ever before, Collins needs to show he still has his team and will have them playing with fire until the end.

If they call it a season now, that’s a reflection on Collins.

Your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to respond. Follow me on Twitter @jdelcos

Aug 27

Loss Of Matt Harvey Leads To Purge; John Buck And Marlon Byrd First To Go

Not too long ago, I wrote the New York Mets should stand pat at the trade deadline to make a run at respectability, but with Matt Harvey gone for the year, that goal has been flushed. The gurgling sound you’re now hearing is the news the Mets sent John Buck and Marlon Byrd to Pittsburgh for infield prospect Dilson Herrera and a player to be named later.

The garage sale has begun and should not stop. With the Mets’ timetable for competiveness now 2015 instead of 2014, the Mets’ thinking should be to stockpile as many prospects and draft choices as possible, which means it shouldn’t end with Byrd and Buck.

BUCK: Gone.

BUCK: Gone.

Until the Aug. 31 deadline to make waiver deals, the Mets should be shopping Daniel Murphy, LaTroy Hawkins, Ike Davis and/or Lucas Duda, Scott Atchison and anybody else not fitting in their immediate plans.

Nobody will net a top prospect, such as what the Mets received for Carlos Beltran, but at this point it doesn’t matter. It’s garage sale time, so they should take what they can get.

Byrd was having a tremendous season, well enough for him to want – and warrant – a two-year deal, or one plus an option. Based on their history, the Mets would have offered one and he would walk without the team receiving compensation.

As for Buck, he evolved as Harvey’s personal catcher, but his playing time was reduced with the addition of Travis d’Arnaud. Buck played the good soldier, but realistically, he performed well enough to look for a full time job.

It won’t be with the Mets, and with Harvey likely done until 2015; Buck would not sit around. Catchers in a pennant race, especially those with a little pop in their bat, are valuable to a contender. The Pirates needed relief for Russell Martin, and it didn’t hurt Buck has a National League background.

Buck was terrific for the Mets, but they wouldn’t have gotten anything for him if he left after the season.

The Mets must now make a first base choice between Davis and Duda. It’s not likely they’ll tender Davis a contract, so get something now. That upside the Mets promised with Davis, well, we haven’t seen it.

Duda would be cheaper, so I’m inclined to believe they’d keep him over Davis. They can’t carry both, especially with Duda not playing the outfield.

Murphy is a reliable bat and could come off the bench as a pinch-hitter, and to an American League team, he has DH potential. And, does anybody believe they’ll bring back Hawkins?

Just a few weeks ago the Mets were thinking about .500 and second place. With Harvey and Wheeler, the future looked bright.

Not so much now.

Your comments are greatly appreciated and I attempt to respond. Follow me on Twitter @jdelcos

Aug 27

No Surprise, Mets Mishandle Matt Harvey Injury

When the New York Mets hired Sandy Alderson as general manager a new culture was promised, including the handling of injuries. It has not come to be. With the Mets and injuries, it remains “speak no evil, see no evil, hear no evil.”

Another Mets mess with injuries.

Another Mets mess with injuries.

Tightness in Matt Harvey’s elbow, and lack of response to it, could put his career in jeopardy. After talking of the need to protect Harvey by capping his innings, he is done for the year and possibly next season with a tear in his elbow that could require Tommy John surgery.

Tell me, is anybody shocked at how the Mets handled this?

Alderson said he knew about the forearm issue for around a month, which would be a week or so after the All-Star break. Terry Collins said he found out about it a few days ago. Harvey said he told the medical staff before the break, which is why his turn prior to the All-Star Game was cancelled.

One is telling the truth. Of the three, I believe Harvey.

Whenever a player, pitcher of not, receives treatment, a report is given to the general manager and manager. This makes Alderson’s and Collins’ comments “challengeable’’ at best. Does anybody seriously think the training staff would withhold information on Harvey receiving treatment?

Even if Alderson is telling the truth, why wasn’t a MRI ordered immediately? Not doing so is the epitome of irresponsibility. Alderson said the Mets didn’t make a trade because he wanted the team to finish strong. But, that objective doesn’t coincide with the need to protect the team’s best pitching prospect since Dwight Gooden.

What is the point of building for the future if you put your best pitcher at risk just to sell a few tickets and have the spotlight on him at the All-Star Game? Was is worth losing Harvey until possibly 2015?

Damn, if Harvey or Zack Wheeler sneeze, get a MRI.

As for Collins, there’s no way I believe he just found out about the injury. It puts his objectives in question and brings to light the problem of a lame duck manager. Collins’ primary goal is to win now and secure an extension, and if that means running Harvey out there with the blessing of the general manager, so be it. There is absolutely no way Collins didn’t know.

Having an asset such as Harvey and not protecting it with an immediate MRI exam the first time he complained of discomfort is reckless and stupid. It is having a Lamborghini and not parking it in a garage.

I understand Harvey’s competitive nature, but sooner or later he has to learn he’s in this for himself. It’s a team sport yes, but he can’t help anybody if he’s hurt. He has to raise his arm – before he’s unable to – and say, “something is wrong, I can’t pitch.’’ Nobody will think less of him.

By not raising a stink, Harvey cost himself the rest of this season and possibly all of next year with Tommy John surgery.

Yeah, I know injuries can happen at any time, but they are more likely to occur when the arm is sore and tight. Maybe it would have happened anyway, but we’ll never know. What we do know is the appearance of how the Mets handled this was fast and loose. Shoddy.

Yeah, yeah, I hear how dozens of pitchers recovered from Tommy John surgery, but how many have not? Surgery is not an exact science. I defy anybody to guarantee 100 percent the result of a surgery.

No doctor would make that assurance and considering their history in handling of injuries, the Mets definitely can’t.

This is a mess and if I’m Harvey, I’d be angry at myself for not being more proactive and at the Mets for their reckless handling of the injury.

As I’ve written dozens of times, when it comes to pitching injuries, always bet the over.

ON DECK: Will the Mets deal now?

Your comments are greatly appreciated and I attempt to respond. Follow me on Twitter @jdelcos

Aug 27

Looking At Life For Mets Without Matt Harvey

Who didn’t watch the New York Mets-Phillies game last night with a bit of indifference? Sure, Zack Wheeler against Cliff Lee possessed an element of interest, but the air was sucked out of the Mets’ season with news earlier in the day Matt Harvey would be lost for the remainder of the year with a partial UCL tear in his elbow.

Tommy John surgery is expected.

HARVEY: Bare facts, Mets not same without Harvey. (ESPN)

HARVEY: Bare facts, Mets not same without Harvey. (ESPN)

Most of the night my mind was as if channel surfing with a remote, bouncing from issue to issue, from the blame game to where the Mets go from here.

Carlos Torres will get Harvey’s start Thursday, but from there, would it be him or will we get a look at Rafael Montero? Then again, will the Mets be overprotective of him, as they were with Wheeler, pulling him with two outs in the seventh after 105 pitches with the opposing pitcher coming up.

From an organizational standpoint, where will the Mets go from here?

The team has been promising it would compete in 2014, but that will be harder to do without Harvey. Then again, should the Mets not make a run for it next year because of Harvey’s injury, what message does that tell the rest of the team?

It basically tells them “sorry boys, you’re not good enough without Matt.’’ That’s not a great message to be sending your team. Look for the Mets to attempt to add a veteran arm, an innings eater, if you will.

He’s not a veteran in the conventional sense, but if I were the Mets I’d be considering Phil Hughes, who’s probably in need of a change of scenery, especially in Citi Field’s vast outfield.

The Mets, who not just two weeks ago were flirting with the idea of a six-man rotation, will be going with a patchwork staff.

The Mets might bring up Montero to fill in for Harvey for a couple of starts at least, even if it means a 40-man roster move. This might be a prudent move as preliminary spring training in anticipation of Montero replacing Harvey in the rotation next season.

Without Harvey, and the Mets after Wheeler’s loss last night, are now losers of five straight, seven of nine and 10 of 14 can pretty much say good-bye to .500, and with 13 games coming up with playoff contenders Atlanta and Cleveland, and seven against the Nationals, second place is fading fast.

ON DECK: Facing the prospect of not having Harvey next year, the Mets could reverse course and suddenly listen to offers for Marlon Byrd and John Buck in the final days of the deadline to make waiver deal.

Your comments are greatly appreciated and I attempt to respond. Follow me on Twitter @jdelcos