Aug 11

Five Questions If The Mets Are To Contend

The Mets answered one of the most important questions if they are to contend, which is whether they would add to their roster. The additions of Yoenis Cespedes, Tyler Clippard, Juan Uribe and Kelly Johnson energized this team. They created further sparks when Travis d’Arnaud was activated from the disabled list and now the pending return of David Wright.

However, there are more questions to be answered, with these being the most pertinent:

QUESTION: How will they handle the pressure?

ANSWER: There’s a minimum of postseason experience on this roster, and Wright still hasn’t returned. Uribe and Johnson have been there before, but not Lucas Duda, Daniel Murphy, Wilmer Flores or Juan Lagares. Eventually they will be faced with a critical situation, one they have yet to encounter.

QUESTION: How will the young arms hold up?

ANSWER: Matt Harvey, Noah Syndergaard and Jacob deGrom have been stellar, but as the season progresses they will surpass career highs in innings pitched. None of them have pitched meaningful games in September.

QUESTION: How good will Wright be when he returns?

ANSWER: Nobody can say, but if he’s his former self considerable pressure will be alleviated down the lineup. The Mets will need another RBI bat in the middle of their order down the stretch.

QUESTION: Will the bullpen hold up?

ANSWER: This is all new for Jeurys Familia, but Clippard has playoff experience. It will be interesting to see if manager Terry Collins has a shorts leash when it comes to his bullpen.

QUESTION: Will they stay healthy?

ANSWER: We’re waiting on Wright, but Duda missed Tuesday’s game. Lagares has had a sore are all year and runners are taking liberties off him on the bases. Fortunately, Harvey has so far responded coming off Tommy John surgery.

Jul 29

Deal With Brewers Falls Through

The Mets had every right to keep Wilmer Flores in the game during tonight’s loss to San Diego. After all, said GM Sandy Alderson and manager Terry Collins, they were trying to win a game. However, caught in the crossfire was an emotional Flores, who received a standing ovation from the Citi Field crowd, which also thought there was a trade sending the young infielder Zack Wheeler to Milwaukee for two-time All-Star outfielder Carlos Gomez.

FLORES: Remains a Met - for now. (Getty)

FLORES: Remains a Met – for now. (Getty)

With the advent of social media, and fans watching the game on television from the luxury suites and listening to the game on the radio, most everybody at Citi Field believed the Mets were on the verge of a major trade.

But, it never happened, and Alderson would not say why the deal fell through.

“There is no trade,” Alderson said. “A trade has not. and will not transpire. … Unfortunately, social media got ahead of the facts.  What was reported has not transpired. We could have pulled him and contributed to the speculation.”

Collins eventually pulled the emotional Flores, who was followed into the Mets’ clubhouse by captain David Wright.

“During the game I heard I was getting traded and I got emotional,” Flores said. “Then I heard I wasn’t traded. … I was sad. I wanted to be a Met forever.”

Gomez, originally a Met, but traded to Minnesota in the Johan Santana trade, would have immediately filled voids as a right-handed power bat and as a leadoff hitter.

Alderson has steadfastly insisted he would not trade from their core of young starters in the current rotation – Matt Harvey, Jacob deGrom, Noah Syndergaard and Steven Matz (on the DL) – which left Wheeler available.

It would be a good deal for the Mets because Gomez, a two-time NL All-Star, fills two offensive needs, while Wheeler won’t pitch until next July. Meanwhile, Flores never took to shortstop, but showed promise at second base. Flores got off to a good start offensively, but slumped over the past two months.

 

Jul 29

End In Sight For Mets’ Colon

Another game, another Bartolo Colon torching leaving the Mets with a few questions.

How long can the Mets go with Colon getting ripped every fifth game? Since they can’t trade him now, can they swap him out for Dillon Gee? Will they wait this out until Steven Matz is ready to come off the disabled list?

COLON: Ripped again. (AP)

COLON: Ripped again. (AP)

Colon at 42, hasn’t won since June 12, which was seven starts ago. Colon was hit for six runs in the first three innings tonight. He’s given up 17 runs over his last four starts, which included a stellar one-run performance in eight innings, suggesting there are games in which the magic is still there.

Colon opened the season with an 8-3 sprint out of the game through May 31 and there were whispers of him making the All-Star team. He’s now 9-10 and that seems like a totally non-plausible thought.

My first thought is to ride with Colon until Matz is ready because the way Gee has pitched, he and Colon are basically one of the same.

The Mets signed Colon to eat innings when Matt Harvey missed last season and to offer a veteran presence to their young rotation. In that regard, Colon has given the Mets their money’s worth but it is clear he doesn’t have it any more.

The Mets tried to deal him last winter but there were no takers. Now, it wouldn’t be surprising if GM Sandy Alderson heard muffled sounds of laughter on the other end of the line when he’s on the phone with other general managers.

It was fun while it lasted with Colon, but the good times are over.

Jul 23

The Mystery Is Over For Colon

If you’re Bartolo Colon pitching against Clayton Kershaw tonight, considering the Mets’ anemic offense you can’t like your chances if you give up a couple of runs.

Then again, if you’re the Mets’ hitters, you can’t like your chances with Colon on the mound. The Mets aren’t scoring and Colon isn’t preventing anybody from scoring and that’s a losing combination.

COLON: Hanging on. (AP)

COLON: Hanging on. (AP)

At one time Colon was 9-4 with a reasonable chance to make the All-Star team. He was one of the good stories early this year.

He goes into tonight’s game against the Dodgers at 9-8, going 3-6 with a 5.74 ERA over his last ten starts. The Mets have lost six of Colon’s last seven starts, scoring just a combined ten runs. The opposition has scored 33 runs.

Colon now finds himself hanging onto his career, one spanning 18 years and eight teams.

When you’re 42 and primarily throw a not-so-fast fastball, you will get crushed if your control is off. Colon simply doesn’t have the stuff to overcome mistakes.

“It’s all command with him,’’ manager Terry Collins said after Colon’s last start. “Bartolo does not change the way he pitches. Primarily fastball, with a mix of some change-ups and some sliders, but when he commands the fastball, the other stuff is just an accent. And when he doesn’t command the fastball, he’s not the kind of a guy who’s going to go strictly off-speed, he just doesn’t pitch like that.’’

The Mets signed Colon two years ago to a $20-million contract with the intent of logging innings when Matt Harvey was out. He surprised us with 202.1 innings and 15 victories in 2014, and with nine wins so far this season. They got their money’s worth.

In fairness, he exceeded early expectations, but unfortunately is now living up to them.

And, it isn’t pretty.