Nov 04

Mets Do Right By Collins

The Mets did right by manager Terry Collins, and more to the point they didn’t waste any time doing it. Less than 72 hours after their season ended – and by Collins’ admission on his bad decision – the Mets extended their 66-year-old manager for two years.

Accused of being tyrannical in his previous stops in Anaheim and Houston, Collins gave his players a lot of leeway. He said he “trusts my players,’’ and in the end that might have cost him when he went against his better judgment and allowed Matt Harvey to go out for the ninth inning in Game 5 of the World Series.

COLLINS: How much more champagne? (AP)

COLLINS: How much more champagne? (AP)

No need to remind you of what happened.

It is key the Mets acted quickly as to not let how the disappointing way the season ended to fester.

The Mets opened the year after six straight losing seasons, but Collins insisted during spring training they were good enough to compete – as is. Yes, the Washington Nationals had a bad year, but the Mets were 90-72 to give Collins a 394-416 record during his Mets’ tenure.

Want to bet that will be over .500 by the time he retires after the 2017 season?

“My job is to pretty much make sure the players are on board with everything we’re doing,’’ Collins said. “So, I think I’ve changed a lot there.’’

Collins was voted the NL Manager of the year by The Sporting News and is up for a similar honor by the official Baseball Writers Association of America award.

“I think it’s well deserved,’’ Wright said. “Credit should be given to TC and his coaching staff for aiding and preparing us for this success. This preparation started years ago, and I’m thrilled this coaching staff has helped lead us to a World Series appearance.’’

Collins’ coaching staff – hitting coach Kevin Long, pitching coach Dan Warthen, first base coach Tom Goodwin, third base coach Tim Teufel, bullpen coach Ricky Bones and bench coach Bob Geren – will be retained. However, Geren will interview for the Dodgers’ vacant managerial spot.


Nov 01

Toast Murphy Tonight; Don’t Boo Him

It should be wild tonight at Citi Field as we say good bye to the Mets for the season. No matter what happens, we won’t see the Mets at home again until next April. By definition, a great World Series needs to go seven and we aren’t there, yet.

Hopefully, we’ll have another couple of nights of watching them on television.

Matt Harvey, Jacob deGrom and Noah Syndergaard have won three straight before this season, and for that season to continue, they must do so again. However, before they can win three straight, they need to win one, and that’s Harvey.

MURPHY: Toast him; don't boo him. (Getty)

MURPHY: Toast him; don’t boo him. (Getty)

It’s fitting that perhaps the final game of the season should come down to Harvey, because in many ways, this whole year is about him. Will he be able to pitch? If so, how many innings will he pitch? He likes to portray himself as a Super Hero pitcher, but let’s face it, he has a long way to go before he can be thought of in that light.

His legacy has yet to be written, but a victory tonight would be a good chapter.

Daniel Murphy, however, is what he is, which is a hard working player who has enjoyed a storybook postseason until last night. He’s played four different positions out of necessity for the Mets, but his best is batter, and he even has limitations at that one.

It is believed the Mets will give him a qualifying offer this winter, but there are no guarantees. I want him back, but would not be surprised if the Mets pass on him. If their decision was based on last night that would be totally unfair, but baseball is not always fair.

So, if you’re at Citi Field tonight, don’t boo him because of last night. Instead drink a toast to his work ethic, personality and what he’s meant to the Mets, and us, over the last few years.

He deserves that.

Oct 31

Mets Now The Hammer?

The Mets’ appreciation of hard knocks depends on whether they are the hammer or the nail on any given day.

Not surprisingly, they didn’t like Chase Utley’s hard slide into Ruben Tejada in Game 2 of the NLDS. Of course, they overwhelmingly endorsed Noah Syndergaard buzzing Alcides Escobar’s head on the first pitch of Game 1.

SYNDERGAARD: Turns tone of Series to Mets. (Getty)

SYNDERGAARD: Turns tone of Series to Mets. (Getty)

Syndergaard didn’t back off his intentions after the game, and in fact, boasted about them.

“If they have a problem with me throwing inside, they can meet me 60 feet, 6 inches away,’’ which was not the brightest of things for Syndergaard to say later.

The Royals haven’t stopped chirping about that pitch, and neither have the Mets.

“He went out there and did his job, and we’re all proud of him for that,’’ said Game 5 starter Matt Harvey. “His comments are, I think for us, kind of taken with a grain of salt. But we’re obviously happy about what he did.’’

There was a lot of speculation about payback before the game, but that was never going to happen.

It’s the World Series and nobody wants to tossed.

And, it’s the World Series an no team likes to have the momentum turn against them, but that’s the case here. The games have been close, but the Royals aren’t the same team they were in Kansas City. And, neither are the Mets. They are now the hammer.

Oct 30

In Noah, The Mets Do Trust

It’s funny how things worked out for the Mets. They were reluctant to bring up Noah Syndergaard in May, but now in October they are counting on him to extend their dream season. Down two games to Kansas City, Syndergaard will take his 100 mph., fastball to the mound tonight at Citi Field.

“We’ve got great confidence in him,” said manager Terry Collins. “I think as much as you’d like to go to that crusty, veteran guy who’s been here, who’s done it, to help bail you out of the hole you’re in, we’re not asking that. We’re asking this kid to go out and pitch his game, and his stuff should play.”

SYNDERGAARD: The future is now. (Getty)

SYNDERGAARD: The future is now. (Getty)

The Mets entered the World Series with a decided edge in starting pitching, but Matt Harvey (6) and Jacob deGrom (5) gave them a combined 11 innings in the first two games. Syndergaard must give them at least seven innings to keep the Royals away from the Mets’ bullpen.

Along with the Mets’ starters, another story line was the Royals’ hitters ability to make contact, especially against fastballs over 95 mph. Syndergaard is 1-1 with a 2.77 ERA and spoke as if he has this playoff thing down pat.

The question has always been posed to pitchers for years: Does he pitch to his strength, even if it is the hitter’s strength as well?

Syndergaard knows a pitcher never wants to get beat with his secondary pitches; if he goes down it will be with his best.

“My main focus is to pitch to my strengths and being able to execute all my pitches, and just focus on winning one pitch at a time,” said Syndergaard, speaking like the veteran he isn’t.

It’s funny how things work. The Mets didn’t want to bring up Syndergaard in May to delay his arbitration and free-agent years to have him conveniently locked up for the future. The Mets singled out their young pitching as the foundation for their future, but the future is now for the Mets.

It is tonight.

ON DECK: Tonight’s lineup.

Oct 26

Five Keys For Mets To Win

It is the day before the start of the World Series and who would have guessed I’d be previewing the Mets? I certainly wouldn’t have, but damn, isn’t this great?



This is the Mets’ fifth trip to the World Series, and they’ve only been favored once, in 1986 against Boston. This time they are a pick `em against the Royals.

If the following are answered in the positive, there could be another parade down the Canyon of Heroes:

Pair of Aces: Matt Harvey and Jacob deGrom go in the first two games and should be well rested. Sure, the Mets can lose both and come back to win, but those odds would be long. One of them has to win if the Mets are to win.

A Murphy-type stretch is needed: If not Daniel Murphy, then somebody needs to get hot. Nobody knows how the layoff will affect Murphy. Maybe it will be Lucas Duda, or David Wright, or Wilmer Flores. Whoever it is, somebody must turn it on.

Overcoming the aches and pains: Harvey has a bruise in the back of his throwing arm; Curtis Granderson has a jammed thumb; Yoenis Cespedes has a strained shoulder.

Building the bullpen bridge: The Mets have had to use Bartolo Colon to get to Jeurys Familia. The bullpen bridge from the starters to the closer hasn’t been strong. The Mets’ bullpen is not as strong as Kansas City’s and that will undoubtedly come into play. If the Royals are winning by the sixth inning that will be difficult for the Mets to overcome.

Shutting down the Royals early: Much has been made of Kansas City’s speed, ability to put the ball into play, and, of course, hit the long ball. The Royals’ offense is more balanced than Chicago’s, and their hitters aren’t intimidated by the Mets’ hard throwers.

There other variables, such as adjusting on the fly to an injury; coming from behind, which they never had to do against the Cubs; dealing with poor weather and bad calls; how nerves will come into play; and what happens when a key player goes cold.

The Mets have been a team of resiliency all season. They need to be that way just four more times.