Feb 04

Alderson Hints Cespedes Deal Could Lead To Bigger Things

Mets GM Sandy Alderson hinted at Wednesday’s press conference that the Yoenis Cespedes deal indicates a change in philosophy for the organization.

Let’s hope so. Long accused of running things on the cheap, Alderson said the $75-million contract should change that perception.

”Sometimes we have a habit – we do in an organization and fans as well – of thinking about the guys we have now, but thinking more about when we’re going to lose them than enjoying the moment,” Alderson said. ”That moment hopefully lasts two, three, four, five years. But I think maybe if the Cespedes signing says anything, is that there are no possibilities that will be dismissed out of hand strictly for financial reasons.”

In particular, let’s hope that will apply to signing their young pitching to long-term contracts. The popular sentiment is the Mets can’t keep them all, referring to Jacob deGrom, Noah Syndergaard, Matt Harvey, Steven Matz and Zack Wheeler.

Maybe not, but the can try to keep them for as long as possible.

”When you’re talking about long-term deals with younger players, there needs to be sort of a mutual interest in doing so,” Alderson said. ”And typically we find out about that mutual interest a little bit later, closer to spring training or even in spring training. So, we’ll just see if that happens.”

Harvey, signed for $4.325 million, will be 27 in March and a free agent after the 2018 season. His agent is Scott Boras, whose reputation is to test the market and not leave money on the table. He’ll be the first test.

Then there is deGrom, (28 in June) who will be arbitration eligible next year and a free agent following the 2020 season. Syndergaard (24 in August) and Matz (25 in May) could become free agents after the 2021 season. Wheeler (26 in May) could become a free agent following the 2019 season.

Money will be coming off the books when the contracts for David Wright, Cespedes and Curtis Granderson expire, but the don’t the Mets have to replace those players as well?

The market for pitching doesn’t seem to show a ceiling, but if the Mets’ core perform to their potential, they’ll test it.

Jan 12

Collins Learns And Moves On From Game 5

Mets manager Terry Collins allowed himself three days to stew on his decision to let Matt Harvey pitch – and kick away – the ninth inning of Game 5 of the World Series. Undoubtedly, he’ll relive that decision when spring training begins in little over a month.

COLLINS: Trusted Harvey. (AP)

COLLINS: Trusted Harvey. (AP)

In the MLB Network documentary, “Terry Collins: A Life In Baseball,” which airs Tuesday night, he said: “I had my bad three days. You’ve got to move on.”

I never thought Collins should have let Harvey stay in, thinking he went away from his principles. But, it was Collins’ decision, not mine, and he has to live with what happened. We have no way of knowing what would have happened had Jeurys Familia entered the game. It isn’t a slam dunk Familia would have saved the game. Afterall, he already blew a save in the Series.

Even had Familia saved the game, the Royals would have had a 3-2 Series lead with Games 6 and 7 in Kansas City. There were no guarantees.

“I don’t know what would have happened, after [Game 5],” Collins said on the show. “But, in my mind , we should’ve made the change. … I trusted this young man. I think the world of him . I still do. We made it. It didn’t work. You’ve got to move forward from it.”

Collins has spent his entire life around baseball, and knows everything is a learning experience. Collins went against what he thought was best and trusted his player.

Here’s hoping he learned from that and will become a better manager for it.

 

Jan 11

Not Collins’ Job To Motivate Mets

As a longtime follower, reporter and blogger about the Mets, I read just about everything I can about the team. Some of it makes sense, some of it does not. I read something today – over a month before the start of spring training – that made me wonder it is with some people.

The author wrote how he couldn’t wait for spring training to see how Terry Collins would motivate the Mets.

Huh?

A major league manager only singularly motivates his players. There is no rah-rah speeches. These guys are professional athletes who are beyond having a manager or coach light a fire under them. Frankly, if you’re a professional athlete and need a manager for motivation you’re not long for the sport. These guys, who all make the minimum of $500-thousand, motivate themselves.

Collectively, this team surprised a lot of people to reach the World Series. All of them should be stinging over what happened to them. Perhaps, the player with the most heat is Matt Harvey over the ninth inning of Game 5.

I’m guessing he’s done a slow burn all winter. At least I hope so.

Jan 01

Happy New Year Readers; Explaining My Absense

I want to post every day, but my last sighting was Dec. 22. Please accept my apologies for my lengthy absence,  but I have been very ill lately and was hospitalized Christmas morning when police found me unconscious in my home. I was in a coma for the better part of three days and spent most of the time since sleeping and being thankful things weren’t worse.

Happy New Year Readers

Happy New Year Readers

I realize I’ve gotten all over Matt Harvey, but will lighten up because my doctor in hospital is the spitting image of Harvey.

I need to slow down and Joe DeCaro from Metsmerizedonline.com will be posting for me until I can go full time again. I will be posing in the next few days my Hall of Fame ballot, which includes Mike Piazza, but not Barry Bonds, Roger Clemens or Mark McGwire.

While I was in the hospital I did a lot of thinking about my blog and how I could make it better. I’ll share my thoughts with you over the next few days. In the interim, I wish for you all a very happy New Year.

Thanks.-JD

Dec 21

More Proof Matt Harvey Doesn’t Get It

Matt Harvey said he’s mad the Mets didn’t win the World Series. That’s fine. However, when he had the chance to answer the batting practice question on The Player’s Tribune of what his biggest regret was in 2015, and responded with “becoming a Belieber,” in regard to becoming a fan of singer Justin Bieber, he blew it.

Then he wrote, is it too late now to say sorry?”

HARVEY: Walking away after World Series collapse. (AP)

HARVEY: Walking away after World Series collapse. (AP)

Maybe he was trying to be cute. Only he knows for sure. But, let’s call The Player’s Tribune for what it is, a joke of a sports media website created by Derek Jeter.

There’s no question Jeter is a future Hall of Famer, but there’s also no denying he was given a free pass by most New York media and created this website because he doesn’t want to truthfully answer or address any tough questions.

Pretty much the same thing applies to Harvey. Until his innings fiasco, the New York media wouldn’t cross Harvey on any issue, despite having just cause. Harvey is the New York correspondent for Jeter’s site. Nobody will question him there.

If Harvey had any stand-up backbone to him, he would have answered the question with “my behavior in the dugout directed at Terry Collins in the World Series.”

But, he didn’t. And, won’t. Not on The Player’s Tribune. Not anywhere. A player’s only website is like a player’s Twitter in that nothing meaningful is ever mentioned. Even so, I checked it out today just in the off chance Harvey wrote anything worthwhile.

He did not. If Harvey does want to apologize for anything, it should be to Collins and his teammates for putting himself over them at the worst possible time.