Sep 17

Mets Wrap: Zack Wheeler Shows He Has More To Learn

Zack Wheeler didn’t take the loss for the New York Mets Tuesday night although he certainly deserved so. This was one of the few times a Mets’ starter came away with a no-decision and it turned out to be a positive for him.

Wheeler was his own worst enemy in five rocky innings as he walked six, including to the leadoff hitter in the fifth that eventually came around to score in large part because he failed to cover first base.

WHEELER: Roughed up by Giants.

WHEELER: Roughed up by Giants.

It is not how Wheeler desired to finish his first season, and certainly not what the smattering of fans at Citi Field wanted to see in an 8-5 loss to the San Francisco Giants.

Because Wheeler is on an innings limit, he might get one more start, next Monday in Cincinnati. It is up in the air whether Wheeler will pitch in the final weekend series against Milwaukee at Citi Field.

Command was a problem for Wheeler in the minor leagues and at times this season on the major league level. This time, he had trouble locating his fastball, and with that it was all an uphill battle.

If there is something to take from Wheeler’s development it has been his ability to minimize damage and put away hitters when in trouble. That’s hard to do when you walk five in one inning, as Wheeler did in the second.

He gave up three runs that inning, but it could have been worse. Even so, Wheeler was in position to get a victory when he took the mound in the fifth. He left the inning with 107 pitches, and pitch counts have been an issue.

Control did him in, but he’ll always remember to hustle to first base.

If the Mets want to stick to Wheeler’s innings limit, that’s fine, but how about skipping him in Cincinnati and let him get a final start at Citi Field? Maybe he’ll redeem himself, and it will be one more chance for the fans to see him.

Wheeler represents the Mets’ future along with Matt Harvey, and perhaps he’ll make the same progressive jump the latter did this season.

With the competitive part of the season long since over for the Mets, their main concern is keeping Wheeler and some players who are injured from doing further damage. In that regard, the Mets are in no hurry to push David Wright.

Prior to the game, Terry Collins said Wright would not be activated for the Giants series because of overall soreness sustained in his rehab from a Grade 2 right hamstring strain.

Wright wants to play, but the prudent thing is to go with caution. Do the Mets really want their last image of Wright this season hobbling off the field after re-injuring his hamstring?

Your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to respond. Follow me on Twitter @jdelcos

Sep 17

Matt Harvey Opts For Rehab Over Surgery; Mets Must Prepare To Not Have Him

The New York Mets haven’t said anything on Matt Harvey not having to undergo surgery other than it is his decision. Multiple news agencies report Harvey will opt for rehabilitation over surgery after getting a second opinion from Dr. James Andrews Monday in Alabama.

The plan is to rehab for up to two months to see how his elbow responds. After that, he’ll have another MRI, and then possibly opt for surgery at that time.

HARVEY: Taking a gamble.

HARVEY: Taking a gamble.

Whether he has surgery now or in two months, Harvey won’t be available until 2015.

Surgery, of course, has no guarantees, but neither does rehab. If I were Harvey, I’d have the surgery and be done with the issue. But, I am not, and I understand it is his decision on his career.

If he has it now, there could be a possibility of him being ready next September. Wouldn’t it be great to have him activated and help them compete for a wild card?

The risk Harvey is taking is not feeling discomfort in November, and making a decision based on that information. He will not be throwing under game conditions. So, if he’s ready to start the season, that’s great, but the gamble is he’ll stay healthy the entire season.

What if he doesn’t? What if there’s more pain and he further tears his ulnar collateral ligament? If he re-injures the elbow and has surgery next summer he would miss the rest of the 2014 season and all of 2015.

That adds another year to when he won’t be pitching.

I understand Harvey’s competitive nature and desire to pitch. It is admirable. I don’t believe he’s being selfish, but I wonder if he’s seeing the entire picture about potential lost time. Although there are no givens in surgery, the odds have greatly improved for undergoing the Tommy John procedure.

Whatever route Harvey chooses in two months the Mets must make starting pitching their priority, even over an outfield bat. Currently, the Mets are looking at their 2014 rotation consisting of Dillon Gee, the staff leader in victories; Zack Wheeler, who’ll be on an innings limit; and Jon Niese, who had his own injuries this year.

Jenrry Mejia underwent surgery to remove bone spurs in his elbow. Noah Syndergaard will not be ready to start next season and Rafael Montero is questionable. The Mets can’t count on Montero to make the team coming out of spring training.

So, that leaves two starters to find for next year. We can safely say Shaun Marcum won’t be an option.

For all the talk of adding a power hitting outfielder and the Mets’ other voids, any chance they have for a winning season is dependent on their pitching. It has been that way for 100 years, and nothing has changed.

Your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to respond. Follow me on Twitter @jdelcos

Sep 16

Mets Matters: Celebrate When It Is Worthy And David Wright Playing Again

The celebrating the New York Mets did Sunday will be nothing compared to what I will do once I get the kinks worked out of my server. I was down most of the weekend and still having problems. Many thanks to Joe DeCaro for his hard work in getting me online again. His efforts are most appreciated, as is his posting on my site.

The Mets are off today before starting a three-game series with the San Francisco Giants.

Just a few thoughts about the weekend series with the Marlins to get caught up:

* Sunday’s celebration was a bit much. And, the shaving cream pie has to go. When you’re in a pennant race, fine, show the joy. But, when you beat the worst team in the majors and arguably your goal is to not finish twenty games below .500, it’s a bit much.

* Dillon Gee pitched another stellar game, and although he isn’t as dominant as Matt Harvey, he has been the Mets’ most consistent pitcher this year. He would easily have 17 victories, and could be closing in on 20, if he pitched for a team that scored some runs.

* David Wright wants to play before the season is over. He has nothing to prove by doing so, and I hope he’s not taking an unnecessary risk. But, his work ethic and desire to play is something to be admired and respected. Let’s hope his teammates are taking notes.

* Several times over the weekend I heard about trading for Giancarlo Stanton. It would be great to obtain such a bat, but it’s a dream. With Harvey’s injury has put a roadblock on trading their young pitching. Plus, can you really see the Marlins trading their best talent within the division? I can’t see that happening.

* I agree with Joe wholeheartedly and don’t believe the Mets should be shopping Daniel Murphy. Yes, there are better second basemen, but Murphy has improved defensively. He’s played well enough defensively to the point where that position is not a priority. The Mets have too many other holes that must be fixed before addressing second base.

* The Mets’ bullpen has been hot and cold this season, but it has performed well in long stretches, enough to where there doesn’t have to be a total rebuilding in that area. And, I’ll say it again – bring back LaTroy Hawkins.

* Kirk Nieuwenhuis has been injured, and when he’s been healthy he hasn’t taken advantage of his opportunities. With Juan Lagares and Matt den Dekker, Nieuwenhuis might be off the Mets’ radar in the future.

* For the second straight year, the Mets’ offense has stumbled in the second half. There has been no mention of replacing hitting coach Dave Hudgens, but you would think that would be considered.

Your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to respond. Follow me on Twitter @jdelcos

Sep 13

Sandy Still Wary Of Big Contracts, But May Add A Big-Ticket Player This Offseason

sandy alderson

Jon Heyman of CBS Sports writes that soon to be free agent outfielder Shin-Soo Choo, currently with the Cincinnati Reds, “fits the bill” for what the Mets need this winter.

Heyman spoke with Sandy Alderson who revealed some of the things he’s considering as the Mets conclude their third losing season under his watch.

“There’s no question long-term contracts carry risk, and right about the time you’re clearing payroll you can wind up right back where you started if it doesn’t work out. On the other hand, you have some times where you have to roll the dice. I certainly haven’t ruled out a big-ticket item.”

Alderson has already made it well known that adding a veteran starting pitcher was already part of his plan this offseason even before Matt Harvey got hurt, but now it may end up being a top of the rotation starter if Harvey were to have surgery and miss the 2014 season – the season he said would be the year the franchise would begin a run of sustainable championship caliber baseball.

Heyman sounds skeptical about Alderson pursuing a big-ticket item and cited several instances when Alderson chided other teams for handing out large contracts both while general manager of the Mets and also when he was a top executive with Major League Baseball a decade ago.

Based on the needs of the Mets and the strengths of the player, Heyman concludes that Choo looks like the biggest potential target for the Mets this winter. He cites that he’s an excellent corner outfielder with a big on-base percentage, making him a perfect fit.

He says that Mets people have discussed him internally at length and predicts Choo will be the biggest player on the Mets’ radar.

Sep 10

Mets Wrap: Dillon Gee Hammered; Some Positive 2014 Signs

In watching the New York Mets Tuesday night what struck me most wasn’t how much the Nationals torched Dillon Gee, but all the empty seats. All that green, along with the upcoming promotion for knit caps screams winter is coming.

Gee wasn’t himself with his command – especially the version who seemingly owned the Nationals – and dug himself into an immediate hole the Mets’ lackluster offense couldn’t overcome.

GEE: After Jayson Werth homer.

GEE: After Jayson Werth homer.

The Mets were 2-for-9 with runners in scoring position and stranded seven in the 6-3 loss. The Mets obviously had enough offense to threaten, but it was the same old story of not getting the clutch hit.

Offensively, the Mets have been aggressive on the bases, so it is hard to question the decision for Matt den Dekker and Eric Young to run only to have them cut down.

“We haven’t been hitting the ball out of the park lately,’’ was manager Terry Collins rationale for the attempted steals.

Even if David Wright and Ike Davis – the Mets’ power entering the season – were in the line-up it is a good thing to see them run. They’ve been doing it all season, and manufacturing runs is a must in any lineup.

On the plus side, Vic Black had a perfect inning out of the bullpen. The Mets need to take a long look him in the wake of Bobby Parnell undergoing neck surgery earlier in the day. Understandably, the Mets did not release a timetable for Parnell, but as with Matt Harvey, they have to assume they won’t have him, at least in the first part of the season.

On a down note, the Mets lost Justin Turner indefinitely with a strained hamstring.

Although they didn’t produce, I liked the combination of Young and Juan Lagares at the top of the order. When you have a weak offense, bunching speed at 1-2 is the way to go.

The Mets opened the season with questions from left-to-right in the outfield, but it isn’t hard to envision Young-den Dekker-Lagares next season.

Den Dekker contributed a two-run single going to the opposite field, which is a good sign. Collins said he’ll eventually hit for power, and there’s no question about his defense. Lagares also plays a strong center field, but has a right fielder’s arm.

The Mets say they want to add a power-hitting outfielder, but considering the loss of Harvey and indefinite loss of Parnell, adding pitching is the priority.

If the Mets can’t add a power bat in the outfield, they have to concentrate on pitching and defense – and hoping for the best from David Wright and Ike Davis.

Your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to respond. Follow me on Twitter @jdelcos