Mar 28

Harvey’s Ailment Cause For Concern

The Mets shutting down Matt Harvey for the remainder of spring training with an undisclosed medical ailment reminds us of the fragility of an athlete. The Mets aren’t being specific as to the nature of the problem, but are saying it isn’t his elbow or shoulder. Agent Scott Boras hasn’t commented. Opening Day is up in the air. And, Harvey could return to New York for tests.

I would definitely say there’s reason to be concerned.

HARVEY: Opening Day in limbo. (Getty)

HARVEY: Opening Day in limbo. (Getty)

Harvey was scheduled to pitch Tuesday, but that’s not happening. Nobody knows for sure when Harvey will pitch again.

“It’s a non-baseball medical issue that we have to address,” Alderson told reporters. “It came up this morning as far as I know. There will be some follow-up tests and consultation that will take place over the next couple of days.”

Alderson said Harvey will undergo tests and the results might not be known for several days. That will only lead to speculation.

“I think it’s a little early to attach any level of concern,” Alderson said. “I think we need to wait for more medical information before we decide it’s of concern, or great concern, or no concern. It’s way too premature for us to be discussing anything related to Opening Day.

“I understand Opening Day is not too far away, but we’re dealing with tomorrow, and we should know something more tomorrow – or the next day. But right now he’s not pitching tomorrow. That’s kind of where the story ends.”

Only it won’t be ending as the questions are only beginning, with not the least of them being: “If you’re a Mets’ fan should you be concerned?”

I would think, yes.

 

 

 

Mar 25

Cespedes Being Cespedes?

Mets manager Terry Collins has been known to fall on the sword for his players when they screw up. He’s done it for Matt Harvey and he did it again Thursday for Yoenis Cespedes after he misplayed A.J. Reed‘s drive into an inside-the-park home run.

Cespedes has been known to give up on plays and go through the motions. Yes, I know it was only an exhibition game, a “practice game,” if you will. But, don’t you practice to get it right?

CESPEDES:  Yoenis Being Yoenis. (AP)

CESPEDES: Yoenis Being Yoenis. (AP)

“Yes, I guess I could grab it,” Cespedes told reporters what his thought process was as the play unfolded.

“He thought it got stuck,” Collins said. “The umpire [C.B. Bucknor] went out and swiped the ball and said it wasn’t stuck. It’s one of those things we could talk about a ground rule, [but] we don’t talk about that much in spring training. … It was just a misunderstanding more than anything.”

Misunderstanding? Huh, that’s an odd choice of words. Cespedes would have had a better chance of selling it had he bothered to bend down and reach for the ball. It’s not really a novel thought.

“The ball fell under the fence,” Cespedes said. “It got wedged in there. For me, I couldn’t grab that. I thought that should have followed the ground rule and should have just been the double.”

Bucknor easily swiped the ball from under the fence, so it clearly did not get wedged. And, as far as not being able to grab it, well, that could be because he never reached for it. The ball isn’t going to come to him, after all.

It will take some doing to beat this out as the dumbest quote of the year.

“[The umpire] said, ‘You should be able to grab that,’ ” Cespedes said. “I said, ‘Of course I could grab that –  if I stick my hand in there and pull it out, yes, I guess I could grab it.’ He stuck his hand in there and pulled it out. I could have done that as well. I just didn’t think that was what I needed to do.”

Translation: “Yeah, I could have gotten the ball had I bothered.”

Cespedes has been known to mailing it in and assuming the play. He got away with it Thursday because the game didn’t matter. That’s his free one. Here’s hoping he learned something and doesn’t do the same thing when the games count.

They will in a little over a week, and that’s when the Mets start paying him $27.5 million.

Mar 21

Mets Matters: How Rotation Should Be Handled In First Week

It shouldn’t be all that hard for the Mets to figure out what to do with their starting rotation in the first week of the season. Should it?

This much we already know: 1) Matt Harvey will get the opener, Sunday night, April 3, in Kansas City, 2) Jacob deGrom‘s wife is scheduled to give birth to the couple’s first child, April 5, which could be deGrom’s game, and 3) the Mets have, unbelievably, three days off in the first week.

Let’s first start with deGrom, who struck out five in four scoreless innings Monday against Miami. It’s very possible deGrom might not be in Kansas City and with his wife for the second game of the season. And, if his arm is there, his mind likely won’t be.

mets-matters logoSo, why not just tell deGrom right now to be with his wife and give the Game 2 start to Noah Syndergaard? It seems to me that would settle things down.

Manager Terry Collins said Monday Syndergaard would pitch in the season’s second game, but it could be in relief of deGrom. “Piggy-backing is the term, but it they are going to do it, make it with Steven Matz or Bartolo Colon. And, whomever is not used then pitch him in relief of deGrom for Opening Day at Citi Field, Friday.

The way things are looking now, it appears the starters won’t get much more than six innings in their first game.

DEGROM NOT BRINGING HEAT:  DeGrom has pitched statistically well this spring (0.90 ERA) but his fastball isn’t where he wants it, and that’s usually the first pitch he’ll command in spring training. DeGrom was clocked around 95 mph., last year, but was 91-93 Monday.

“I feel like it will come,” deGrom told reporters. “I’m getting everything back in line mechanics-wise, everything will be there. It’s spring training. I’m not worried about it all.”

DeGrom’s fall off in velocity raises the question that in the Mets’ effort in protecting their pitchers and cutting them back early this spring, that perhaps they didn’t give them enough work to build up their strength and stamina.

AROUND THE HORN:  David Wright was hitless in three at-bats and played five innings at third base. “This is just, for me, a normal spring-training build-up now,” Wright told reporters. “There’s nothing really out of the ordinary. I know it took a little while to get going, but we’re going now. And, as far as I’m concerned, it’s just like a normal spring.” … Shortstop Asdrubal Cabrera, who hasn’t played since March 10 with a strained left knee, should be available as a DH this week. … Yoenis Cespedes, Curtis Granderson, Lucas Duda and Travis d’Arnaud will make the cross-state trip to Tampa for Tuesday’s game against the Yankees. Matz will start for the Mets.

 

Mar 10

Syndergaard Makes Us Wonder How High His Ceiling Can Be

It was just Noah Syndergaard‘s first exhibition start for the Mets, but you can’t help but wonder what his upside could be. Could it be higher than that of Matt Harvey or Jacob deGrom? Syndergaard gave us a glimpse last year, but every time he takes the mound he has us wanting more.

SYNDERGAARD: How high is the ceiling? (AP)

SYNDERGAARD: How high is the ceiling? (AP)

“There’s always a debate about who’s going to be the best,” Mets manager Terry Collins told reporters. “This kid’s got a chance to be the guy.”

Harvey and deGrom breezed in their exhibition starts. Syndergaard put down the first eight Cardinals, gave up a hit, then got out of the third without a run. Syndergaard cruised.

Perhaps the reason for our attraction or interest in Syndergaard is how hard he throws. He was sitting on 98 mph. consistently today. When he really lets it loose, he’s over 100 mph. Harvey and deGrom put it in the high 90s, but 100 is a special number for a pitcher.

That’s Nolan Ryan territory, and he dominated until his 40s before his arm gave out.

“I felt great out there,” Syndergaard told reporters. “It’s just nice getting out there and getting your feet wet. I was a little amped up. It’s been a long wait to get on the mound, and to be able to get out there and compete. But, overall, l I think it was a pretty solid performance. There are a few things I’d like to continue to work on, just to make the game easier than it can be.”

The caveat, of course, is staying healthy. Harvey, deGrom, Steven Matz and Zack Wheeler have all had Tommy John surgery. Syndergaard thinks about the same happening to him – a lot.

“I’ve thought about it quite a bit,” Syndergaard said. “But, I trust myself to put my body in the right situations to be able to perform at a healthy level.”

And, a healthy Syndergaard makes us wonder just how high that level can be.