Dec 18

A Case For Not Trading Gee

There’s been a lot of talk about the Mets wanting to trade Dillon Gee. I understand their reasoning and on the surface it all makes sense.

However, I wouldn’t be the contrarian I am if I didn’t examine the other side.

Sure, the rotation looks crowded with the return of Matt Harvey. But, what if his return from elbow surgery isn’t smooth? What if Jon Niese continues to falter? What if Zack Wheeler and Jacob deGrom regress? What if Noah Syndergaard isn’t ready?

Few things go as seamlessly as hoped, especially if you’re the Mets. You should know that by now if you’ve been following them for any length on time.

The fact remains, the Mets have potential pitching issues, and with the trade market stagnant, there’s no reason to force a trade just to free up space.

Just wait, they could use another pitcher before the season is over.

 

Dec 09

Examining Mets’ Trade Assets

I keep hearing the Mets are willing to trade and have the chips to do so. However, it is well known they aren’t willing to part with Matt Harvey, Zack Wheeler, Jacob deGrom or Noah Syndergaard.

So, what’s left to deal, and what is their trade value?

As the Winter Meetings progress, let’s examine their trade assets:

Jon Niese: The pros of being left-handed with a manageable salary have been negated by mediocrity and injuries. That the Mets have hung a “For Sale’’ sign on him further lowers his value.

Dillon Gee: Could have value, but more likely at the trade deadline. Mets’ obvious desire to deal him lowers return.

Bartolo Colon: Mets eager to trade him, also. They would have to eat part of his contract. Again, more likely to attract interest at July deadline.

Travis d’Arnaud: Nobody would trade for him outright as he’s still unproven.

Lucas Duda: Has value, but if he goes who will hit home runs?

Daniel Murphy: Haven’t the Mets been wanting to deal him for years? If somebody wants him, he’s available. But, don’t expect him to draw a significant return.

Wilmer Flores: What does it tell you that the Mets are still searching for a shortstop before he even gets a chance?

David Wright: With six years and $107 million remaining on his contract, plus a recent injury history, he’s not going anywhere.

Michael Cuddyer: They just signed him.

Juan Lagares: He could have trade value for a team wanting to build with speed, defense and youth. Oh, wait, isn’t that what the Mets want to do?

Curtis Granderson: His power is in decline and he has three years and $47 million left on his contract. Sure, the Mets would like to deal him. But, who would take on that contract and what could you get?

Jeurys Familia, Jenrry Mejia and Bobby Parnell: Three power arms in the bullpen would attract interest. However, Parnell is coming off an injury that hurts his value. But, haven’t the Mets been wanting to build a bullpen for four years now?

Dec 03

So Far, Harvey Buying Into Mets’ Plans

Since it’s only December, everything must be taken at face value when it comes to Matt Harvey. You want to take him at his word, but I wouldn’t be me if I weren’t skeptical after hearing him say at this afternoon’s press conference he was on board with the Mets’ decision to limit his innings this summer.

HARVEY: It is early.

HARVEY: It is early.

Harvey bucked the Mets before, so it wouldn’t be a surprise if he did again.

GM Sandy Alderson said there’s a soft cap on Harvey, which is to say there’s no definitive plan. I prefer something more concrete. Even Harvey conceded 200 innings won’t happen, nor should it 17 months after surgery.

“You know what? I’m going to be happy to throw an entire year,’’ Harvey told reporters at Citi Field. “Whatever they decide, it’s in the best interests of both the team and me moving forward. I can’t wait to throw every five days and just be healthy for a full season.

“Looking forward, if you were to map out a whole season, you’re going to have to figure out some changes throughout the year in order to get to a certain point. I mean, if you make 33 starts and seven innings a start, obviously doing the math that’s over what I’m probably going to throw.’’

That’s logic talking, not the usual emotions we get from him. Alderson said the plan is to limit Harvey during the season, but have no restrictions should the Mets reach the playoffs. However, if the Mets are eliminated early, bet on Harvey being further cut.

What the Mets pledge to do is not just yank the plug on him the way Washington did Stephen Strasburg in 2012.

Harvey has been throwing on flat ground six days a week at Citi Field and plans to report to spring training Feb. 1 and face hitters right away.

All this is optimistic, but if Harvey buys into the Mets’ plans this should go smoothly.

One can only hope.

Nov 30

Mets’ Trade Options Limited

The Winter Meetings begin a week from today, but the Mets’ time in San Diego figures to be uneventful because they only have one commodity to spend – and saying that is a stretch.

It is fashionable to say the Mets have lot of young pitching and they do, but they aren’t willing to trade Matt Harvey, Zack Wheeler, Jacob deGrom and Noah Syndergaard. You can appreciate them reluctant to trade any of these foundation building blocks.

GEE: Trying to move him.

GEE: Trying to move him.

But, the Mets are more than willing to trade Dillon Gee, Bartolo Colon and Jon Niese. The common denominators are they are at the back of the Mets’ rotation and make the most money.

Another common thread is none are expected to bring much in return, which means don’t anticipate anything happening. At least, anything of significance.

Two will be the Opening Day rotation because Syndergaard won’t be brought up prior to June to preserve his Super Two status. Bet on it being Niese and Colon, with Gee possibly going to the bullpen in long relief.

However, at $5 million, that’s steep for the bullpen, and more so for the minor leagues.

With other options, both of the trade and free-agent variety available in the market, teams could shy from Niese ($36.5 million over four years if both options are picked up) and Colon ($11 million).

Niese’s contract, injury history and mediocrity make him especially hard to trade.

If the Mets move any of the three, it might be more likely to happen at the trade deadline.

 

Nov 20

Six-Man Rotation Won’t Happen For Mets

With the topic of cutting Matt Harvey’s innings comes the idea of a six-man rotation.

One reader threw it out there and my response was it was too bold for the Mets’ thinking. That’s part of it, but there other variables.

Baseball doesn’t change easily, and there was a time when the five-man rotation was a novelty. Six? It could happen sometime, but I don’t sense the Mets will be the trailblazers.

Here’s why I don’t think it will happen:

* Pitchers are creatures of habit, which are hard to break. They are accustomed to their present workload of starting every fifth day and adding another day would break that routine. Some might not mind, but Harvey, for one, would pitch a fit.

* Teams have made a considerable investment in their pitchers, and going to a six-man rotation would take away as many as seven starts a year. While that would be perfect for this season and Harvey, it won’t translate over the long haul. These guys want to pitch, and missing seven starts is a lot.

* The Mets have a plan for Noah Syndergaard, and it doesn’t include pitching before June and disrupting his Super Two status. Syndergaard will pitch this season, but not at the cost of moving up his arbitration year.

* The Mets are in position where things could break their way with their rotation and the last thing they want to do is make a move which would force all five starters to make an adjustment.

Six starters sounds good, but it won’t happen.