Aug 21

No Surprise, Matz To Have Season-Ending Elbow Surgery

As much as Steven Matz and the Mets tried to convince us to the contrary, the team finally admitted something was wrong with the left-hander’s arm and placed him on the disabled list with surgery expected to follow.

MATZ: Done for year. (AP)

MATZ: Done for year. (AP)

It only took eight lousy starts to convince GM Sandy Alderson to finally seek the exam that revealed a ulnar nerve condition that if it doesn’t respond to a cortisone injection and more than two weeks of rest, will have season-ending surgery.

Matz’s condition is similar to Jacob deGrom’s last year, but we all know people respond differently from surgery, so it is only a guess he’ll be ready for spring training.

“I think it’s something [Matz] has had to deal with and we felt this was the best time to address it,’’ manager Terry Collins said. “I am sure some of the issues have kept him from being the pitcher we know he can be.’’

Translated, Collins’ quote tells us: 1) this has been bothering Matz for a long time, and 2) don’t believe it when Mets’ management, or their pitchers, say there’s nothing wrong.

Since July 9, Matz is 0-6 with a 10.19 ERA, numbers to be expected considering opponents are hitting .385 against him with seven homers. Matz, 2-7 with a 6.08 ERA overall, joins Noah Syndergaard, Matt Harvey, Zack Wheeler and Seth Lugo on the disabled list.

“There’s no guarantees, especially with young, power pitching, that you are going to say these guys are all going to be healthy throughout the season,’’ Collins said. “We came into this season saying we were prepared for it, because we had seven guys. Five of them went down. I just think you need to keep as much pitching around as you possibly can because you never know when you are going to need it.’’

EXTRA INNINGS: Robert Gsellman was superb in his second start since coming off the disabled list, giving up one run on five hits in 6.1 innings. … Matt Harvey gave up two runs in three innings for Double-A Binghamton in his second rehab start. … Jeurys Familia is scheduled to make consecutive appearances Tuesday and Wednesday, and barring complications could be activated this weekend when the Mets are in Washington. … Yoenis Cespedes has ten RBI in his last 11 games.

 

Aug 16

Mets Better Served With Lagares In Center

As much as I enjoy watching Michael Conforto, and have no doubt about his ability to play center field, the Mets would be better served – assuming they don’t shock everybody and bring back Jay Bruce – if Juan Lagares plays center field.

LAGARES: Gold Glover. (AP)

LAGARES: Gold Glover. (AP)

After all, Lagares won a Gold Glove in center and is blessed with outstanding speed, and if GM Sandy Alderson expects to build the 2018 Mets with pitching, defense should be at a premium.

Lagares has flashed his defensive brilliance in this series, and had two hits in tonight’s 5-3 loss to the Yankees. He doubled leading off the game, and what I loved to see, beat out a bunt leading off the eighth.

JUDGE GOES DEEP: Seriously, he went deep for the second time against the Mets, this time driving a Robert Gsellman pitch into the third deck – in left center.

Judge’s 37th homer was measured at 457 feet.

NEW FACE AT THIRD: Both Jose Reyes and Wilmer Flores were scratched from the starting lineup, each with sore rib cage muscles. Travis d’Arnaud started his first professional game at third base.

Rib cage injuries can take a long time to heal so don’t be surprised if one, or both, end up on the disabled list.

The Yankees eschewed a chance to test d’Arnaud in the first inning when they had a runner on third, but Didi Gregorius elected not to lay down a suicide squeeze bunt.

Depending on the situation, d’Arnaud rotated between third and second, but amazingly the ball didn’t find him until Aaron Hicks popped out in the ninth.

WRIGHT UPDATE: David Wright, on the 60-day disabled list with a shoulder impingement and spinal stenosis, thinks it is possible he could play this season, but GM Sandy Alderson doesn’t think he’ll have enough time.

“I don’t know how many answers he will have, or we will have through the end of this season,’’ Alderson said, adding the Mets could attempt to add a third baseman in the offseason.

EXTRA INNINGS: Matt Harvey threw three scoreless innings in his second rehab assignment for Class-A Brooklyn. Harvey struck out the side on ten pitches in the third inning. … Rene Rivera homered, the Mets’ 179th of the season. … Mets’ hitters struck out eight times. … Gsellman, who started for Seth Lugo, gave up three runs on four hits in 5.1 innings. … Paul Sewald gave up a two-run double to Gregorius in the seventh to take the loss.

 

Aug 15

Even In Defeat, DeGrom Shows Why He’s An Ace

Jacob deGrom might be one of the few things left worthwhile watching with these Mets, but even he doesn’t have it every start. It wasn’t a complete stinker, but he was clearly off his game tonight.

Even so, he gave the Mets a chance a chance to win, and seriously with the way this season has gone, could you ask for more?

DE GROM: Grit personified. (AP)

                                 DE GROM: Grit personified. (AP)

“I’m not sure,’’ deGrom said when asked what was off more, command of his fastball or secondary pitches.

In some ways, tonight deGrom reminded me of that playoff game against Los Angeles he had no business winning, but kept fighting the Dodgers all night. That’s what aces do, they give their team a chance when it seems hopeless.

“He pitches,’’ manager Terry Collins said. “He keeps you in the game. He just battles.’’

Let’s hope Wednesday night’s starter, Robert Gsellman, was taking notes, as was Thursday’s starter, Steven Matz. And, for that matter, everybody in the Mets’ rotation.

For that matter, that should include Matt Harvey and Noah Syndergaard.

ROOKIES ROCK: Dominic Smith and Amed Rosario each hit two-run homers to help get the Mets back into the game.

It was Smith’s first career homer and the second for Rosario.

Collins said the Subway Series was the perfect scenario for Smith and Rosario to learn under pressure, yet he pinch-hit for Smith in the ninth inning in favor of Jose Reyes against Aroldis Chapman.

“This guy mows down left-handed hitters,’’ Collins said of Chapman. “Some challenges can be just too daunting. But, he’ll have his chances down the road.’’

Reyes reached on an infield single, but even so, I would have let Smith hit for himself. How are you going to learn otherwise?

Smith will always remember tonight for his first career homer, not for being pinch-hit for, and, it’s not like his confidence would be shaken even if Chapman blew him away on three pitches.

 

 

Aug 15

Today’s Question: Why Not Try Harvey As Reliever?

Matt Harvey passed his audition for Single-A Brooklyn in his first rehab start, working one inning for the Cyclones. Undecided is where he’ll throw next.

Here’s an idea: Since the second rehab won’t be longer than two innings, why not have him pitch in the majors out of the bullpen?

HARVEY: Why not the pen? (AP)

HARVEY: Why not the pen? (AP)

Of course, he wants to start, but with the Mets’ bullpen simply awful – I can’t bear to watch Hansel Robles anymore – give Harvey a couple of innings out of the pen.

It could work if Harvey was told in advance what day he’ll pitch. That way:

He could keep his between starts routine and avoid the up-and-down regime of a reliever because knowing when he’ll pitch in a game he can warm up at his own pace.

Besides, he might like it, and if successful, this could lengthen his career. Dave Righetti, Dennis Eckersley and all made the transition, and the latter two ended up in the Hall of Fame.

Harvey’s career to date has been injury filled and disappointing. This could be a revival for him.

The season is lost anyway, so why not try it? It wouldn’t hurt. It is out-of-the-box thinking, and isn’t that what progressive organizations do?

 

Aug 13

Mets’ Bright Spots In Lost Season

There are always a few rubies that can be found in this garbage dump of a Mets season. This year, the shiniest of the gems are Michael Conforto’s emergence of being a star and Jacob deGrom’s recovery from surgery to being an All-Star caliber starter.

The other highlights have been the production of traded Mets Jay Bruce and Addison Reed; the professionalism of Curtis Granderson; and promotions of Amed Rosario and Dominic Smith.

Once a question to even make the Opening Day roster, Conforto began the season in a pinch-hitting role, but his success, coupled with Granderson’s slow start and injuries to Yoenis Cespedes, increased his playing time and subsequently run production to the point where he made his first All-Star team.

CONFORTO: Huge bright spot. (AP)

CONFORTO: Huge bright spot. (AP)

Conforto’s two-run homer gave him his 26th of the season, but more importantly, the Mets a two-run lead in the first inning, one they never relinquished in today’s 6-2 victory over the Phillies.

Conforto hit 12 homers last season, so his home run ceiling was just a hunch. Now, with 26, you would think 35 could be within reach with 47 games remaining.

I’ve long advocated Conforto should hit third in the order, ahead of Cespedes, and hopefully manager Terry Collins will keep him there. I also like that even with the trade of Bruce, Collins is keeping Conforto in center field. If the rest of the season is about laying the foundation for 2018, then hit Conforto third and in center and leave him there – hopefully, for the next dozen years.

Conforto’s last five hits have been homers, and since the All-Star break has 12 homers with 23 RBI.

As for deGrom, he took a line drive off his pitching arm Thursday, but all indications are he’ll make his next start, Tuesday at Yankee Stadium. DeGrom is 13-5 with a 3.21 ERA and 1.14 WHIP. The word “ace,’’ gets thrown around a lot, but it’s clear cut when talking about deGrom, who works fast, and despite an overpowering fastball, more importantly has excellent command of all of his pitches.

With Noah Syndergaard, Zack Wheeler and Matt Harvey on the disabled list, and Steven Matz struggling and winless in over a month, deGrom has been the rotation’s workhorse

The Mets are clearly in a rebuild, salary dump mode, which is why Bruce, Reed, Lucas Duda and Neil Walker are gone, and Asdrubal Cabrera and Granderson could soon follow. Jose Reyes will stay to be Rosario’s caddy.

Bruce hit 29 homers with 75 RBI to lead the Mets, and has already made an impact with the Indians, going 5-for-12 with three RBI. You can describe Bruce, Reed, Walker and Granderson as consummate professionals.

Rosario booted a play in his debut that cost the Mets a game, but Bruce and Walker were seen in the dugout giving him counsel on what he should have done differently.

As for Granderson, he’s still being shopped, and maybe raised his value with three more hits today, including a two-run homer. He won’t be re-signed for 2018 and it is puzzling why there isn’t more interest. Granderson has four homers and nine RBI over his last ten games.

With Granderson, Bruce and the other veterans with expiring contracts assuredly not going to be here next season, the future belongs to Conforto, Rosario and Smith.

They, along with deGrom, give the Mets something to build on for next year.