Dec 06

Reyes took the money and ran … before pulling another hammy.

I have no problem with Jose Reyes taking the money and running. There are fewer and fewer players who’ll play their entire careers with one organization. Cal Ripken did it. Derek Jeter will do it. I thought Albert Pujols would do it, but I’m not so sure anymore.

REYES: A no brainer decision by him and the Mets.

I can’t even guess the odds on David Wright doing it now.

I never figured Reyes would be one of those players. Early in his career he begged the Mets to give him a long term deal. They did it, to him and Wright, when they didn’t have to. It was a good business decision then, but at the time Reyes was saying how he desperately needed the money for his family. It was a sign he didn’t manage his funds well, and would eventually go for the bucks.

No problem, because that’s the way of the sports world.

There are some interesting things to come out of Reyes signing with the Marlins. While the Mets never gave a formal offer their early conversations with Reyes included a base with incentives – games and plate appearances – that could have pushed it over his magic figure of $100 million. The Marlins’ money is guaranteed, so if Reyes blows out a hamstring and ends up playing 50 games a year for the Miami he’ll still get paid.

Knowing Reyes’ injury history the past three years, the Mets were right to be cautious. So, too, was Reyes. He knows he’s not durable, so it was a no brainer for him to take the guaranteed money.

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Dec 05

A cold winter is upon us as Reyes bolts for Marlins.

The Winter Meeting hadn’t yet begun when they ended for the Mets in the late hours last night at the Dallas Hilton Anatole when Jose Reyes accepted the Miami Marlins’ six-year, $106-million offer.

REYES: He's gone.

Hell, they might as well pack up and leave town now because without the Mets having made an offer, it is clear they don’t have the money to compete. They can leave an intern behind for the Rule 5 draft.

Truthfully, there’s no point in feigning anger or disappointment over losing Reyes, because anybody with a clue knew it was going to end this way. What we didn’t know were the numbers or final destination, although it rapidly became evident it would be Miami as no other players emerged.

Detroit, San Francisco, Milwaukee were rumored to have interest, but they recognized Reyes’ demands were excessive for an injury-prone player and never entered the bidding. The Mets can hardly take solace in that others thought the same, because there’s the uneasy truth at what a non-bid means.

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Nov 19

Just thinking ….

Several things going on with the Mets, but nothing of imminence about to happen. Thought I’d throw out these thoughts to you:

* If Jose Reyes is that deep into talks with the Marlins, then it stands to reason Miami’s key player – Hanley Ramirez – is on board with it and the idea of moving to third base. The Marlins would be stupid to alienate their best player by going after somebody who plays the same position without running the idea past him. To think otherwise would be naive.

* Sandy Alderson came out of the GM meetings in Milwaukee saying Daniel Murphy was available. If the Mets are willing to listen to offers for David Wright, then it is logical to think so is everybody else. Murphy has shown in his limited window an ability to hit for average and get on base, but he’s also demonstrated a propensity for getting hurt and an inability to play a position. Murphy might go as part of a package, but seriously, do you see any team calling the Mets and saying, “we have to have Murphy,” so what will it take? Plus, coming off an injury, who will bite on that without knowing if he can play? Murphy will be with the Mets in spring training.

* Work has already begun on moving in the fences, which I think is a gimmick move that will eventually back fire. The Mets didn’t win at home last year, so the thinking has to be to come out and at least watch them hit more home runs. Trouble is, with the Mets’ suspect pitching, so will the opposition. So, what the Mets might add in terms of run production, they will give up as many, if not more. And, I don’t care about Wright’s ego. He shouldn’t be thinking about home runs anyway, but concentrating on striking out less and getting on base more.

* Did you see where Anna Benson will be on a show “Baseball Wives?” More classy programming. Unless she’s in a bikini, or less, it is Must Miss TV.

 

 

 

Nov 14

Alderson talks with Reyes’ agents; team likely to tender Pelfrey, but not Capuano.

At the GM meetings in Milwaukee, Mets’ GM Sandy Alderson acknowledged speaking with the Jose Reyes camp, but figures weren’t given. Alderson described the talks as “early” and “amicable,” which won’t get your blood boiling.It is hardly inspiring, is it?

Alderson said it isn’t guaranteed the Mets will get an opportunity to match another team’s offer. The Mets won’t necessarily get the last chance to talk with Reyes, which has been customary in numerous instances between teams and their free agents. For example, the Yankees often tell agents to come back to them to get a chance to beat it, which they often do.

Reyes might have had a good meeting with the Marlins, but again, it is still early in the process. There can’t be a bidding war with only one team.

There’s no way anybody can be optimistic about the Mets’ re-signing Reyes, or for that matter, doing anything significant this winter. A team in need of pitching, the Mets aren’t interested in bringing back Chris Capuano, despite him giving them a productive season.

All indications are the Mets will tender Mike Pelfrey, who could make as much as $6 million for going 7-13 with a 4.74 ERA, a significant regression from 2010 when he appeared to have a breakout season.

The Mets’ rotation currently has plenty of questions attached to every pitcher:

* How healthy is Johan Santana and what does he have left?

* Can Mike Pelfrey live up to expectations and rebound to his 2010 form?

* Was Dillon Gee a fluke?

* How healthy is Jon Niese?

* What can they expect from knuckleballer R.A. Dickey?

Bring back Capuano would have provided more depth and competition, but not doing so means the Mets are extremely cost conscious which reminds us as to Alderson’s objective, which is to stabilize the team’s financial structure.

Alderson was hand picked by Commissioner Bud Selig to save the Mets and prevent Major League Baseball from taking over the franchise as they did the Dodgers.

There’s been speculation since Alderson was hired he’d eventually be Selig’s successor as commissioner, and the Mets are considered to be a test for him. Alderson’s job description is to streamline the Mets’ finances and bring some solvency to the organization.

MLB doesn’t want to commandeer the Mets and force a sale as they did the Dodgers, but that doesn’t mean they won’t if things don’t improve.

 

 

 

Nov 09

Fish met with Reyes today.

The Miami Marlins met with Jose Reyes this afternoon but not surprisingly did not make an offer. Rarely do teams make a contract proposal during the initial meeting as nobody wants to set the market.

REYES: Talked with Marlins today.

Reportedly, Boston, the Yankees and Atlanta will pass on Reyes. Those believed to have interest are the Marlins, Washington, Detroit and Milwaukee.

Philadelphia could be a player if they don’t re-sign Jimmy Rollins. San Francisco was believed to be interested, but that might change in the wake of acquiring Melky Cabrera to be their leadoff hitter. The Giants still need a shortstop and will talk with Rollins. Both Cabrera and Rollins would cost them less than Reyes.

I’m believing four years at $80 million should be the limit for Reyes, but other media outlets are saying five years at $100 million, and it has been reported Reyes wants six years at upwards of $120 million.

Would I like to see Reyes with the Mets next season and beyond? Yes, I would, but I wouldn’t be interested in breaking the bank with him because of his injury history and the high probability of him not finishing his contract healthy.

Nothing has happened to convince me he’s not a goner.