Jan 26

Small-Market Brewers Shame Mets

The Milwaukee Brewers have long been regarded as a small-market franchise while the Mets play in the country’s largest market. Yet, events over the past 24 hours paint the two franchises with different brushes: The Brewers as a team that wants to win while the Mets continue to take the cheap way out and give their fans no reason to come out this summer.

In a span of less than two hours last night the Brewers engineered a trade for outfielder Christian Yelich, a budding superstar, and then signed outfielder Lorenzo Cain to the largest free-agent contract of the winter.

Either of those moves separately would have improved the Mets, who yesterday signed Jose Reyes for $2 million to play a utility infield role if they sign either Todd Frazier or Neil Walker or Eduardo Nunez.  Any of those three combined with Reyes won’t substantially elevate the Mets to contending status.

As of now, the Mets can only be projected to finish ahead of Derek Jeter’s dumpster fire in Miami, who had scuttled their team to save money. In addition to the revenue the Marlins will make from the television networks, they will get another $50 million from the sale of MLB Advanced Media.

So, what Jeter is doing is what George Steinbrenner always hated – and something he always accused the Mets of doing – which is pocket the money derived from the networks and revenue sharing and not put it back into improving the team.

The Brewers ponied up four prospects for Yelich and $80 million over five years for Cain, prices that would force GM Sandy Alderson hang up the phone.

 

 

Jan 04

Imagine Being A Marlins’ Fan

If you’re a Mets fan, and the assumption is you are, then you have to be grateful to Miami, because as stagnant as Wilpon’s team has been, the Marlins simply don’t care. Derek Jeter, one of baseball’s greatest frauds, is the face for the Marlins’ latest ownership group bent on stripping whatever competitiveness is left of the franchise.

The Marlins, reeling after the death of ace Jose Fernandez, were realistically a pitcher or two of being a contender for a wild card. Two starters could have made it a possibility.

Well, after trading Dee Gordon to Seattle, and Giancarlo Stanton the Yankees for a song, and then Marcell Ozuna to the Cardinals for a whistle, the Marlins can be regarded possibly as worse than the Mets.

That would be assured if Jeter is successful in trading outfielder Christian Yelich, catcher J.T. Realmuto and infielder Martin Prado. Compounding matters for the Mets is the contenders to land these players are the Nationals, Braves and Phillies.

Reportedly, Jeter told MLB in the screening process he had no intention of stripping the Marlins. Whether he did or not is open for debate, but his actions speak otherwise.

The Marlins’ ownership groups have always been a mess, and it goes before Jeter. Have you forgotten the Marlins gutted their franchise after winning the World Series in 1997 and 2003?

This time Jeter didn’t even wait until a parade. He has scuttled the Marlins. So, if you think things are bad with the Mets, imagine being a Marlins fan.

Dec 26

Handling Of Lagares Illustrates True Mets’ Dysfunction

Because the Mets are willing to trade Juan Lagares – despite the health concerns with Michael Conforto and Yoenis Cespedes – further underscores the dysfunction of the Wilpon ownership and their lieutenant GM Sandy Alderson.

LAGARES: Another dysfunctional move. (Getty)

LAGARES: Another dysfunctional move. (Getty)

That the Mets signed Lagares to a five-year, $23.5-million contract in the first place based purely on potential was a reasonable idea gone bad because they never gave him a chance play fulltime and develop his stroke and plate presence.

Alderson gave him that contract, and yet didn’t let him play. When Lagares eventually played injuries forced him out of the lineup. Now, with Lagares presumably healthy, they are willing, perhaps even eager, to trade him to free up payroll despite their outfield holes.

Is this something an organization committed to winning does?

Ideally, since the Marlins are in a selling mode, I’d like for them to pursue Christian Yelich, but that’s just a pipe dream. So are Lorenzo Cain and Jarrod Dyson.

In the Mets’ dream world, they would like to deal Lagares’ $6-million 2018 contract and spend the savings on Jay Bruce, who’ll they’ll also play at first base because they don’t have faith in Dominic Smith.

Then, because their farm system is barren, they can deal Smith. Basically, it’s paying your VISA bill with a cash advance from American Express.

Reportedly, Alderson will have only $10 million to transform this team that finished 22 games below .500 into a contender. And, don’t forget this is a team with holes at first, second and third, the outfield, and in the rotation.

Oh, and they’ll need another reliever if they deal AJ Ramos’ $9-million contract.

And, you guys wonder why I am negative about Alderson and this team at times?

Nov 20

Mets Release Partial Spring Training Schedule

The Mets released a partial spring training schedule this afternoon with 12 dates still to be filled in. This spring the Mets at a home-and-home with the Yankees, and so far four games against the champion Astros. The schedule also features games against the Braves, Cardinals and Nationals.

Feb. 23 Braves at PSL

Feb. 24 Cardinals at PSL

Feb. 25 Marlins at PSL

Feb. 26 Astros at West Palm Beach

Feb. 27 TBA

Feb. 28 Braves at Disney

Mar. 1  TBA

Mar. 2  Nationals at PSL

Mar. 2  Astros at West Palm Beach

Mar. 3  Marlins at Jupiter

Mar. 4  TBA

Mar. 5  TBA

Mar. 6 TBA

Mar. 7  Yankees at PSL

Mar. 8  Nationals at West Palm Beach

Mar. 9   Tigers at Lakeland

Mar. 10 Yankees at Tampa

Mar. 11 Astros at PSL

Mar. 12 TBA

Mar. 13 Nationals at West Palm Beach

Mar. 14  Marlins at Jupiter

Mar. 15 Marlins at PSL

Mar. 16 TBA

Mar. 17 Nationals at West Palm Beach

Mar. 18 Orioles at Sarasota

Mar. 19 Astros at West Palm Beach

Mar. 20 Cardinals at Jupiter

Mar. 21 TBA

Mar. 22 Nationals at PSL

Mar. 23 Cardinals at PSL

Mar. 24 Cardinals at Jupiter

Mar. 25 TBA

Mar. 26 TBA

Mar. 27 TBA

Mar. 28 TBA

Mar. 29 REGULAR SEASON STARTS

Nov 07

Why Mets Won’t Get Dee Gordon

On the surface, adding Dee Gordon seems like a good idea, but is it really?

Gordon is 29 with a lifetime .293 average. Twice he’s had over 200 hits and five times has exceeded 30 stolen bases in a season. Three times he’s had over 50 steals and led the league.

GORDON: Won't get him. (Getty)

GORDON: Won’t get him. (Getty)

Who wouldn’t want that kind of production for the Mets – and from a position of need at second base? However, there are also some not-so-flattering numbers.

There’s no denying his speed and ability to steal bases, but he only has a .329 on-base percentage. In seven years, he only has 136 walks, with a career-high 31 in 2014. Not good for a leadoff hitter.

Also, not good is his extra-base production. For all that speed, you’d think he’d have more doubles. He hit 24 is his All-Star seasons of 2014 and 2015, and 20 last year. That comes from hitting the ball too much in the air (.153 average with only 13 hits in 85 at-bats). That’s not good in a park like Citi Field.

Even so, he’ll draw interest. The Marlins will want pitching, but whom do the Mets have that is healthy? More to the point, whom would the Marlins take?

Then there’s the matter of money.

Gordon made $7.8 million last season, which is doable. However, he has three years plus an option remaining. He will make $10.8 million this year, followed by $13.3 million, $13.8 million and a $14 million option in 2021.

If Gordon’s on-base percentage and extra-base hit production was complementary to his speed, that would be a more reasonable contract. As it is now, it is enough for the Mets to pass.