Jun 10

Giants Light Up Dark Knight

Another game, another bunch of homers hit – no, make that crushed – off the Mets’ Matt Harvey.

The Giants looked comfortable in slugging three homers off Harvey and ripping him for seven runs. It was the second time in four starts he was blistered for seven runs.

HARVEY: Ripped again. (AP)

HARVEY: Ripped again. (AP)

Harvey (now 6-4 with a 3.62 ERA) has given up 12 homers and 24 extra-base hits overall in 12 starts. After Harvey was rocked for 11 runs in consecutive losses to Pittsburgh and Miami, manager Terry Collins suggested the problem was a dead arm.

Harvey quickly dismissed that stock theory for when a pitcher gets torched a couple of times, which made sense because he was clocked in the mid-90s and including the Marlins game, threw over 100 pitches in back-to-back starts.

So, what’s the problem? Why has Harvey given up eight homers in his last four starts, after giving up eight homers in his previous 26?

First, consider Wednesday was Harvey’s 48th career start, which puts him in the equivalent of his second full season, which is when the real learning takes place. And, don’t forget, the hitters are learning, too.

We also must remember he’s coming off Tommy John surgery and perhaps his arm isn’t what he would want. His breaking pitches, in particular his slider, don’t have the same bite they had in 2013 when he was an All-Star and achieved cult status.

We must also look at his walks. He’s only walked 14, which is a great stat, but it also means his pitches are usually in the strike zone. Although he still throws hard, Harvey must recognize he can’t get by simply throwing heat. It also suggests his pitches, although thrown hard, don’t have the darting movement needed.

Knowing Harvey’s control is exceptional; hitters don’t hang around to fall behind in the count. Harvey has given up three homers on the first pitch (overall hitters are batting .450 off him on the first pitch). He’s also given up five homers after being behind 1-0 in the count.

So, it isn’t just one thing, but several contributing factors to why hitters are lighting up the “Dark Knight.’’

 

May 26

All The Numbers Add Up To Good News For Harvey

Matt Harvey topped out at 96 mph., Saturday when the Mets were routed in Pittsburgh. That velocity belied manager Terry Collins‘ guess of a tired arm, which often it the first choice of those who really don’t know.

So far, everything adds up to just a bad start.

HARVEY: Encouraging news.  (AP)

HARVEY: Encouraging news. (AP)

Harvey, who is coming off a career-worst seven-run hammering at the hands of the Pirates, had his normal between-starts throw-day today, and left without saying anything. This normally could be interpreted as troubling news, but pitching coach Dan Warthen said things went well.

Why would Warthen say that if it weren’t true?

To date, Harvey has not been seen by an orthopedic specialist, nor has he had X-Rays or an MRI – at least the Mets aren’t reporting such – so all that has to be looked at in a positive light.

Harvey will be working with an extra day of rest Friday because the Mets are off Thursday, but if Collins is sure something was wrong with his pitcher’s arm, it would be a no-brainer to totally skip him.

So, unless the Mets are concealing something, it all adds up to Harvey stinking up the joint last Saturday. It happens.

 

Apr 30

Mets Wrap: DeGrom Beaten; Wright Not Ready; Montero To DL

Well, today sure did stink for Mets, whose day began with the news Rafael Montero will go on the disabled list and David Wright is at least a week from coming off it. The day ended with Washington ripping Jacob deGrom and sending the Mets an 8-2 message they are far from ready to concede the NL East.

The loss was the Mets’ 15th in their last 16 games against Washington at Citi Field. It is now time to refer to their fast start in the past tense as they’ve lose five of their last seven games.

De GROM: Takes blame. (AP)

De GROM: Takes blame. (AP)

“We got off to a good start, but the last seven games have been disappointing,” manager Terry Collins said. “We have to go back and do what we were doing, which is catching the ball and not walking guys. … We knew there were going to be blips, and this is a blip.”

Just as they had against the Yankees, the Mets had deGrom and Matt Harvey set up for the first two games. DeGrom was torched by the Yankees last Friday and the Nationals did the same tonight.

The Mets gave him a 2-0 lead, but Wilmer Flores‘ sixth error of the season set up a three-run fourth for the Nationals. Yes, the error and uncompleted double play hurt, but part of a pitcher’s job description is to minimize damage. Sometimes a pitcher has to pick up his defense.

“It might have disrupted his thought process,” Collins said. “Obviously it didn’t help.”

DeGrom, a stand-up guy, pointed the finger at himself and made no excuses.

“I have to do a better job of picking Flo up right there,” deGrom said. “Normally, I do a pretty good job of it, but I started overthrowing.”

Naturally, SNY’s post game was all over this, but analyst Nelson Figueroa showed he’s in over his head as he jumped on Flores relentlessly and let deGrom off the hook. It’s always easy to lay off the bigger name and go after a non-name such as Flores.

Washington chased deGrom in the sixth and broke the game open with a three-run ninth.

At the start of the week, the Mets held an eight-game lead over the Nationals. It is now down to five and the Mets must rely on Harvey to stop the flood Friday night.

Meanwhile, Wright returned to baseball activities today in Port St. Lucie. GM Sandy Anderson said Wright is at least a week away.

Remember, when it comes to the Mets and injuries, always bet the over. Especially when Alderson is laying the odds.

The Mets also received bad news when Montero was placed on the disable list with swelling in his rotator cuff.

“It shouldn’t be serious,” Alderson said.

Of course not. It’s never serious when it isn’t your shoulder.

 

Apr 29

Mets Game Thread: Colon Back On Stride

Bartolo Colon seems to have corrected what bothered him in the first and is keeping the ball down.  He pitched around the muff by Wilmer Flores, who clearly tried to rush the play on Ichiro Suzuki’s grounder.

Thanks to a RBI hit from Lucas Duda, he has tamed the Marlins.

By the way, Curtis Granderson is heating up and doing more than drawing walks.

Mets 3, Marlins 2 (6th)

Apr 29

Mets Game Thread: Cuddyer Homers; Colon Struggles

It hasn’t been a good start for Bartolo Colon, who gave up a two-run homer to Giancarlo Stanton. Quite simply, the ball was crushed.

Colon struggled with his control and was getting his pitches up. The pitch to Colon was belt high and out over the plate.

Michael Cuddyer, who is back in the line-up, hit a two-run homer for the Mets in the first.

Mets 2, Marlins 2 (2nd)