Sep 26

DeGrom Makes His Final Cy Young Case

As he has been all summer, Jacob deGrom was simply brilliant tonight in his final start of what could be a Cy Young Award-winning season. Despite an alarming lack of run support, deGrom overcame frequent criticism for a lack of wins and said he coveted winning the annual pitching award.

“I don’t think it has set in yet,’’ deGrom said of his season which included beating the Braves tonight, 3-0, giving up only two hits and struck out ten to give him 1,000 so far in his young career.

In 32 starts, deGrom, 10-9, with a 1.70 ERA, 0.91 WHIP and 269 strikeouts. Perhaps, most impressive was that hitters batted .142 with RISP and he finished the season with 29 straight starts of giving up three runs or fewer. He gave up one or no runs in 18 starts.

“I try not to look at the numbers,’’ deGrom said. “I try to put this team in position to win. I am very happy with how the night went.’’

One pitch at a time is a standard cliché for pitchers, but deGrom said was his secret.

“In the past where I got in trouble it was because I thought too much,’’ deGrom said. “I’m not letting things get to me. I learned to not worry about things I can’t control. I wish I had more wins, but it is what it is.’’

HARVEY SHOWS TRUE COLORS … AGAIN: The Mets have moved on from Matt Harvey, but the team remains in the mind of the temperamental former starter.

Traded to Cincinnati earlier this season, Harvey will be a free agent after this season, and without mentioning “Mets,’’ when asked about this winter, said: “There’s only one team out there I would not sign with, that’s about it.”

He didn’t have to say what team.

Injuries and his late-night partying sabotaged Harvey’s tenure with the Mets. He didn’t help himself any when he feuded with management about injury rehab and was suspended last year for blowing off a game without permission.

Harvey further alienated himself with the Mets when he refused a minor league rehab assignment to work on his mechanics.

Harvey could draw some interest this winter, but he needn’t worry, the Mets have no thought of bringing him back.

WRIGHT WON’T PLAY AGAINST BRAVES: Third baseman David Wright has been activated but assistant general manager John Ricco said it is unlikely he will play against the Braves because they are trying to earn home-field advantage in the Division Series.

However, Ricco left open the possibility he could pinch-hit in a blowout game. He is expected in pinch-hit Friday against the Marlins.

“I hope to go out there and do something that doesn’t embarrass me, but it’s going to be difficult, not having an at-bat for a while,” Wright said.

Manager Mickey Callaway said Jose Reyes will start alongside Wright at shortstop Saturday.

“When I’m hurt, I never put my uniform on. I wear a hoodie or something like that,” he said. “So, to put that thing on again means the world to me, and is something that you tend to take for granted.

“I’m really nervous, I’ll tell you that. I’m really excited. Got the butterflies going. It’s going to be a weird, yet fulfilling feeling,” he said. “I want to put on as good a show as I possibly can — and at the same time soak it all in.”

Wright hasn’t played in the majors since May 27, 2016, due to the neck, back and shoulder injuries that required surgery. Last month, Wright batted .171 (7 for 41) with a double and two RBIs in 10 rehab games for Class A St. Lucie and two with Triple-A Las Vegas.

CALLAWAY COMING BACK: Ricco said he won’t be a candidate for the GM position next year, but indicated Callaway was likely to return next season as manager.

“I think what’s impressed me the most is for a rookie manager in New York, he’s got the team playing hard all the way down to the end,” Ricco said. “He’s really got a lot of guys trending in the right direction. The young guys are playing hard and winning games, and our pitching, we’ve seen guys take big steps forward.”

 

Sep 19

Mets Offense As Bad As The Numbers Say

The Mets were shut out for the 12th time this season tonight in Philadelphia, which along with injuries and their bullpen, accurately defines the Mets’ most serious deficiency this summer.

The offensive breakdowns can be attributed to injuries primarily to Jay Bruce, Yoenis Cespedes and Michael Conforto.

The rankings, for lack of a better word, are just ugly. With ten games remaining, they rank:

26th in runs scored with 646, with only the Padres, Giants and Marlins in the National League behind them.

27th in hits with 1,212, ahead of the Phillies, Diamondbacks and Padres.

18th in doubles with 246, 52 behind league leader Atlanta.

19th in homers with 164.

21st in RBI with 619.

12th highest with 1,301 strikeouts, which has long been a franchise problem.

22nd with 64 stolen bases.

28th in batting average at .236.

21st in on-base percentage at .312.

24th with a .704 OPS.

24th in total bases with 2,014.

19th in extra-base hits with 442.

It has been said you can make statistics say anything you want, but there’s no way you can make them say the Mets have had a good year at the plate.

WHEELER SHUTDOWN: As suggested here a few days ago, the Mets have shut down Zack Wheeler for the remainder of the season. Manager Mickey Callaway said Wheeler has nothing left to prove.

“We’re really excited about the year he had, and we feel like we’d probably be taking the best care of him we can if we shut him down at this point,” Callaway said.

Corey Oswalt will take Wheeler’s spot in the rotation, beginning Saturday in Washington.

Wheeler didn’t pitch in 2015-16 following Tommy John surgery and had last year cut short with stress on his arm. After a rocky start this year, he has a 9-1 record and 1.68 ERA in 11 starts in the second half.

“[My] body after this long is starting to wear down a little bit,” Wheeler said. “But if I really needed to for the playoff push or something, I could definitely go out there and finish it up. That’s not why I’m stopping. It’s just being smart, really.

“I’ve done some thinking, and I wish the first part of the season was more like the second part. Obviously, I think overall it was a good season for me. A bit of a learning experience at the beginning. I made some adjustments, and I was able to take off the second half.”

TEBOW TO RETURN: Tim Tebow is expected to return to the Mets organization in 2019.

Tebow underwent season-ending surgery on his right hand in July to repair a fractured hamate bone. In 84 games at Class AA Binghamton, Tebow hit .273 with six homers and 36 RBI and started as the DH in the Eastern League All-Star Game.

 

Aug 20

The Mets Put Smith It Position To Make Error

Zack Wheeler now knows what Jacob deGrom has felt like most of this season with the Mets wasting another one of his solid starts and coming away with a no-decision. Wheeler has been one of the Mets’ bright spot in this dark season and watched his team lose, 2-1, in 13 innings to the San Francisco Giants, Monday at Citi Field.

I GOT IT, YOU TAKE IT. (AP)

I GOT IT, YOU TAKE IT. (AP)

The Mets were beaten because two pop-ups fell in against the shift in the seventh, and Dominic Smith – playing left field – collided with Amed Rosario for a run-producing error.

“It’s frustrating when you make your pitch and there’s no result,’’ Wheeler said. “We should have had somebody there.’’

Wheeler said the shift gives and takes away, “and it’s part of the game.’’

What shouldn’t be part of the game is to have a first baseman play left field. That has the disaster written all over it. Manager Mickey Callaway threw Smith under the bus and put most of the blame on Smith.

“It’s inexperience,’’ Callaway said. “He hasn’t done this a lot. He has a learning curve he has to go through. That’s an easy play for our team and we messed it up. We cost ourselves the game tonight with fundamental stuff.’’

Smith played deep on the play and called for the ball late.

“I called it way too late,’’ Smith said. “That’s on me.’’

No, it’s on the Mets, who played Smith in left field, instead of his natural first base. Seriously, don’t the Mets already know all they need to know about Wilmer Flores, who is not their first baseman of the future?

The Mets have been telling us Smith is their first baseman of the future, and with the season long since over, he should be getting at-bats at the position. This is mismanagement at its highest.

Jul 22

Lack Of Communication Defines Mets’ Relationship With Cespedes

No, I can’t tell you with any certainty what is going on with the Mets or Yoenis Cespedes, these days. Nobody can. Not even Cespedes, although he does have a lot of explaining to do.

Actually, so do the Mets trio of general managers, not to mention COO Jeff Wilpon. The caveat is it will be preferable to get truthful explanations, not those that defy comprehension.

CESPEDES: No communication with Mets. (AP)

CESPEDES: No communication with Mets. (AP)

Or even logic.

Cespedes, after missing over 50 games with a strained hip flexor, returned from the DL Friday night and homered against the Yankees, then after the game said he needed surgery to treat dual heel calcifications and could miss up to ten months, which, if he went under the knife tomorrow could return next June.

Manager Mickey Callaway said “I’m not quite sure what he said,’’ about Cespedes’ bombshell announcement, but does it really matter? This was way above Callaway’s paygrade and should have been addressed way before Yankee Stadium Friday.

For example, who was the doctor who told Cespedes he needed surgery, and when did he tell him? It stands to reason this was a doctor not affiliated with the Mets, because if it was wouldn’t he/she have warned the front office Cespedes wasn’t ready to be promoted or cleared to return?

You would think so.

Also, when was Cespedes given this prognosis? Was it before Cespedes volunteered to play first base? Kind of convenient if it was, because wouldn’t it be just like Cespedes to make us feel good about him one moment just before he pulls the rug out from under us the next?

Of course, for the over two months Cespedes was on the DL, he said nothing to the media, which is consistent with his prima donna attitude. Sometime during those two months, somebody got into Cespedes’ head about his feet.

If I’m the Mets I’m doing two things: 1) wondering if the Mets have any legal grounds in which to void Cespedes’ contract and if they do not, whether they would attempt to buy him out.

After all, it is clear he doesn’t want to play for the Mets, and if he undergoes surgery on his heels, he will miss at least another five months if he has the good sense to have the procedure immediately.

But, that would entail Cespedes and the Mets acting in concert, but there’s a total disconnect between the factions.

It will never happen.

“I don’t think it’s a disconnect,’’ said assistant GM John Ricco. “It’s not like he has been saying this for months and we just haven’t been listening. For the first to our knowledge, the first he even was considering this surgery was when he said it on Friday.”

If that’s the case, then it is clear the Mets haven’t been talking with Cespedes recently. Isn’t that what is the very disconnect between the Mets and Cespedes?

 

May 04

Mets Banish Harvey From Gotham

In the end, Matt Harvey’s Mets’ career ended in the way in which he lived it, with stubbornness and selfishness. The Mets’ long, tumultuous nightmare with Harvey ended today when the hard-partying, formerly hard-throwing right-hander was told he would be designated for assignment because he refused to help himself by taking a Minor League assignment.

The Mets didn’t want Harvey to go to Las Vegas as punishment for partying last weekend in Los Angeles on the team’s first night in San Diego, but in the hope he could rediscover his mechanics that one time produced 98 mph., fastballs and had him destined for superstardom.

HARVEY: In the beginning. (MLB)

HARVEY: In the beginning. (MLB)

The Mets will designate Harvey for assignment prior to tomorrow’s game, which will give them a week to either trade him, which won’t happen, release him or place him on irrevocable waivers.

With teams knowing they can just sign Harvey after he’s released rather than give up talent, it will be a miracle if there’s a trade. The Mets are destined to eat the remainder of his $5.6 million contract.

“This was a long time coming,” GM Sandy Alderson said. “This is something we’ve tried to address, we’ve struggled with, we’ve wrestled with over two managerial regimes. The move to the bullpen was dramatic in itself. So I think that at this point, pragmatism, realism far outweighed other considerations.”

Harvey, who twice refused to speak to reporters when the Mets were on the West Coast, left Citi Field without a word and a 34-37 record with a 3.66 ERA over six seasons.

Manager Mickey Callaway, whose reputation of helping pitchers rediscover themselves was in part why he was hired, accepted responsibility, ironically which was something Harvey rarely did.

“We feel like we failed Matt Harvey,” said Callaway. “Our job is to help every player in there. It’s not a good feeling when you can’t.”

Harvey’s career began as the seventh overall pick in the 2010 MLB Draft. Two years later, he debuted in 2012. The following season Harvey blossomed into part star/part comic book character after he was featured on the cover of Sports Illustrated calling him “The Dark Knight of Gotham’’ after the Batman movie.

Nobody knew it at the time, but the moniker would hurt Harvey as he seemed more interested in being a New York hero instead of a New York star. Ironically, Harvey’s downfall started before his career highlight, which was starting the 2013 All-Star Game at Citi Field.

Harvey initially withheld tightness in his right forearm after a start prior to the All-Star Game. The Mets didn’t do Harvey any favors when rather than pull him from the game they let him start.

It didn’t take long before it all started to unravel for Harvey, who was diagnosed with a torn ulnar collateral ligament. Rather than immediately opt for Tommy John surgery, which several doctors recommended, Harvey chose to rehab the elbow, which was his right, but a bad decision as it set him back several months.

After spring training in 2014, Harvey fought with the Mets as to where he would rehab. The Mets wanted him to train in Port St. Lucie, but Harvey insisted on staying in New York where he could date models, go to the Rangers games, and party.

Harvey was quoted in a magazine article about how much he wanted to squire women like Derek Jeter and boasted of his drinking like a college sophomore.

Harvey returned in 2015, but not without controversy. The Mets began the season saying they would monitor Harvey’s innings, but there didn’t seem to be a concrete plan and former manager Terry Collins handled it poorly by letting him start with a strep throat and work into the late innings when the Mets were routing the Yankees.

Rather the closely monitor Harvey’s innings, they became an issue when his agent, Scott Boras, raised the possibility he might not pitch in the postseason. This painted Harvey in a bad light until the agent backed down.

Harvey did pitch in the postseason, but skipped a workout prior to the NL Division Series because he was hung over from a night of drinking. Harvey’s signature moment came when he pitched a hissy fit in the dugout and talked Collins into let him go out for the ninth inning of Game 5.

The next year Harvey developed thoracic outlet syndrome. He also missed time in 2017 with shoulder weakness, but also drew a three-game suspension for blowing off a game because he was sleeping off another party fest.

Harvey continued to struggle this season, then cursed at reporters who questioned him about going to the bullpen. Then was his night of partying in Los Angeles, the plans were made while the team was playing a game in St. Louis.

“I like Matt, in spite of all the stuff that’s gone on, certainly because of a lot of the stuff that’s gone on,” Alderson said. “He’s a human being. He’s a vulnerable human being, and kind of leaves himself open for those of us who know him and whom he semi-trusts. I’m going to miss him in a lot of ways.”

And, probably won’t miss him in a lot of other ways.