Aug 26

My brush with greatness ….

The year was 1998, the season of the great home run race and when the Yankees steamrolled through Major League Baseball. It was also the year Cal Ripken’s streak came to an end.

KENNEDY: My brush with greatness.

KENNEDY: My brush with greatness.


That was also my first year on the Yankees beat and I’ll always remember a flight I took from Boston to Washington. I was sitting in the exit row by a window reading a magazine when this man plopped down in the aisle seat. I recognized him immediately, and a few minutes later he extended his hand and said, “I’m Ted Kennedy.”

I said, “I know,” and introduced myself. A few minutes later, I told him, “in all fairness, I should tell you I’m a newspaper reporter.” I didn’t think it would be right for him to be ambushed the next day in the papers by something he might have said or done.

He appreciated the gesture and we began to chat. When I told him I covered baseball, he responded with stories of how his father, Joseph, took him and his brothers to games in Fenway Park. He then spoke of the Mark McGwire-Sammy Sosa home run race and Ripken.

I told him I once wrote a term paper my freshman year in college about him. I was a big liberal at the time.

Not once did we talk of politics or social issues. I figured he gets that all the time. I did want to tell him how touched I was about the eulogy he gave for his brother, Robert, but wasn’t sure if it would strike a sad nerve. I always wonder what he might have said had I brought it up.

It was a pleasant conversation. After awhile, he started reading some files and I returned to my magazine. We started talking again before the end of the flight, and when we landed we shook hands and went our separate ways.

I was surprised nobody bothered him during the flight and nobody approached him at the gate when we left the plane. A few days later, I sent him a note telling him how I enjoyed our conversation.

I told my editor of the meeting, and his response was a curt, “What in the hell were you doing in first class?”

May 26

That name rings a bell

I knew I heard her name before. Obama’s Supreme Court pick, Judge Sonia Sotomayor, was instrumental in ending the 1994-95 baseball strike when she issued an injunction preventing Major League Baseball implementing a new Collective Bargaining Agreement and using replacement players.

Replacement players. That was another brilliant idea by Bud Selig.

I remember that time as I spent nine weeks in the Marriott in Tampa covering spring training that year waiting for the strike to end. I was at the hotel so long I got my own parking space.

I hope you all had an enjoyable weekend and looking forward to speaking with you tonight on Mets Chat Room.

Feb 09

I want the damn asterisk

Of course, it isn’t fair players from the steroid era are all painted with the same brush of suspicion and scorn reserved the cheaters. It’s painful players who had nothing to do with steroids are lumped in with the others just because they played in this era.

It’s not fair, but since when is “fair” ever the issue?

There was the dead ball era, the lively ball era, the pitching era (take a look at some of the pitching numbers from 1968), and now we have the steroid era.

Steroids are part of baseball’s history, and we all know history isn’t always pretty. Sometimes, it is dirty and distasteful, which defines the steroid era. However, Major League Baseball, and I’m talking about Bud Selig and the MLB Players Association, can’t stick their heads in the sand a second time.

They did so when McGwire and Sosa danced pretty around the bases and that night in St. Louis when the former embraced Roger Maris’ kids. How upsetting to think of that now. The media, of which I am a part of, cheered them on with only a minority bothering to ask the disturbing questions or look under the dirty rocks.

And, it is being done so again without any label to this era.

I want the damn asterisk. I want this to be known as the steroid era, and I want every player linked to steroids to have the asterisk next to his career numbers. I want the notation they aren’t recognized as all-time record holders.

It won’t totally clean things up, but it will out those recognized as cheaters and define this disturbing era.

Sep 12

Your suggestions welcome

My name is on the blog, but it really belongs to you. In a previous post, I received a suggestion I’ll on how to make things easier to read. Thanks.

I am still learning the technical aspects of the blog, such as photos, links and blog rolls. There will be more art and audio. One of the things I was considering was a short podcast prior to Mets Chat Room. Kind of like a pre-game show.

If there is anything you’d like to see style, aesthetics and content wise please let me know. I’m learning on the fly and will try to get to everything eventually.

One other thing, Joe McDonald, who has put this together with me wants me to consider a New York Giants and Major League Baseball blogs (yes, it would include Yankee content). Your thoughts?