Mar 02

Mets Matters: Looking At Harvey, Left Field And Other Issues

It is way too early for rave reviews, but the first impression of Matt Harvey have been positive. Harvey threw to hitters – who swung this time – Monday morning and the reaction has been good.

Curtis Granderson especially liked Harvey’s command, telling reporters: “The big thing is he went to both sides of the plate really consistently and accurately and effectively. If he did miss, it was a miss that he wanted to make — not toward the middle of the plate.’’

mets-matters logoHarvey is ready, if not anxious.

“Once the hitters start swinging, that’s kind of a sign games are near and the season is coming closer,’’ Harvey said. “For us it’s exciting. Especially being 18 months from a competitive game, it’s a good feeling.’’

This is the last time for Harvey to be scheduled against hitters before Friday’s exhibition game against Detroit.

Pitching coach Dan Warthen said Harvey is slated to throw 35 pitches over two innings Friday, and will not exceed 40 pitches.

DUDA TO SWING THIS WEEK: First baseman Lucas Duda, bothered by a strained left intercostal muscle, could start hitting off a tee this week.

Manager Terry Collins said if that goes well he could start taking batting practice next week.

UP IN THE AIR: Collins hasn’t decided who’ll be his leadoff hitter, but favors Juan Lagares over Granderson.

Collins wants Lagares’ on-base percentage, which was .321 last season, to be in the .330 to .340 range.

Left field is to be determined between Granderson and Michael Cuddyer. Neither is greatly experience in left field, but both say they are willing to play wherever Collins wants. Cuddyer has three career starts in left, while Granderson has 22. Collins will rotate them for two weeks before making a decision.

“Obviously I don’t have much experience, but at the same time there’s no saying that I can’t come over there and learn,’’ Cuddyer told reporters about playing left field. “I take a lot of pride in being an athlete, not just a right fielder or a first baseman. It’s being a baseball player. And the definition of being a baseball player is going out and playing baseball where the manager puts you. So it’s fine with me.’’

You love to hear that stuff.

 

Feb 27

Did Duda Push Injury Too Far?

As sure as the sun rises in the East, the Mets will have a spring training injury issue. It is the way of their world.

DUDA: Did he sit on injury?

DUDA: Did he sit on injury?

This spring it is first baseman Lucas Duda, who won’t be allowed to swing a bat for at least a week because of a strained left intercostal muscle. Initially, it was reported Duda had a strained left oblique and wouldn’t be able to swing the bat for up to three days. Then it was an intercostal muscle and he’d be out a week.

However, what is alarming is that ESPN reported Duda was bothered by this injury for “the past couple of weeks,’’ which leads to several questions:

* Did Duda report this injury, and if so, did the training staff clear him to swing the bat?

* If Duda did not report the injury to the training staff, then why didn’t he?

Every year there’s a player who trains through pain. It’s admirable to be a hard worker, but it is foolish to force things.

Manager Terry Collins told reporters: “Nobody is more upset than he is. He’s a workaholic. He’s bound and determined to be as good as he can be. He overdid it, and now he’s got to back off.’’

This spring the injury envelope was first pushed by Duda.

Feb 25

Mets Matters: Syndergaard Motivated

I really like what Noah Syndergaard told reporters in Port St. Lucie about his reaction to not being called up at the end of last season.

Realistically, it wasn’t going to happen as to protect his Super Two status.

mets-matters logoAfter getting the call from GM Sandy Alderson, Syndergaard refused to sulk, but instead used it a source of motivation.

“It was kind of heartbreaking,” Syndergaard told ESPN. “I went home, let things relax a little bit, and then got back in my workout program and just enjoyed time in the offseason.

“But it was disappointing. To be in the big leagues has been my dream ever since I was a little kid. … I use it as a little extra motivation, because I don’t want to hear that phone call again.’’

Syndergaard is expected to open the season at Triple-A Las Vegas and join the Mets in June.

Syndergaard, 22, needs to develop a secondary pitch because scouts say he relies too much on his outstanding fastball. Normally, pitchers move up to the next level when they begin dominating the competition, something he did not do evidenced by his 2014 Vegas numbers: 9-7, 4.60 ERA and 1.481 WHIP in 26 starts.

By his own admission, Syndergaard said he wasn’t ready.

“Being in Triple-A, you’ve got guys who have been in the big leagues for a number of seasons. So they can hit a fastball,’’ Syndergaard said. “Hitting is timing, and pitching is throwing off timing. If you throw three fastballs on the heart of the plate, they’re going to time one up.’’

Nobody knows how good Syndergaard will be, but he has the right idea.

HARVEY TO THROW FRIDAY: Matt Harvey’s come back from Tommy John surgery will take another step Friday when he throws to hitters for the first time.

The plan is to take batting practice, but there’s even the chance the hitters won’t even swing, but to stand at the plate to re-acclimate him to having a batter in the box.

DUDA UPDATE: Lucas Duda’s side injury has been changed from a strained oblique to a intercostal muscle. He’s not expected to resume swinging until Friday.

ON DECK TOMORROW: Among other things, I’ll project the Mets’ Opening Day roster.

Feb 24

Leaning Toward Lagares As Leadoff Hitter

The Mets are undecided as their leadoff hitter, with the competition coming down between Juan Lagares and Curtis Granderson.

LAGARES: Should get leadoff job. (AP)

LAGARES: Should get leadoff job. (AP)

For my money, I’d rather open the season with Lagares for the simple reason this decision doesn’t only impact the No. 1 spot, but also the middle of the order.

While both players are potential strikeout machines, Granderson offers a higher upside as a run producer in the middle. He has greater power and I’d rather bunch him with Lucas Duda and Michael Cuddyer, than leaving him exposed at the top.

My thinking is Granderson could produce more runs batting sixth than Lagares can leading off.

Both have the speed needed to hit first, but neither is the classic leadoff hitter in that both strike out too much and don’t have high on-base percentages. Both can steal a base, but I’d rather see Granderson’s speed trying to stretch a double in the gap into a triple.

For a team struggling to score runs, this is the best way to go.

ON DECK: Mets Matters: Today’s notes.

Feb 24

Duda Strains Oblique

You’re a winner if you had Lucas Duda in the pool as to what Met would be the first to strain his oblique muscle. Duda strained his right oblique swinging a bat and won’t hit for two to three days.

Duda will continue to work out in the field.

Manager Terry Collins plans to limit the amount of swings a batter takes, just as a pitcher is restricted.

A lot of players report early and often over-do it. Players also work hard lifting weights, but often overlook doing core strength exercises, which includes the oblique muscle.