Oct 01

Robles Suspended

Major League Baseball suspended Mets reliever Hansel Robles for his high-and-tight pitch directed at the head of Phillies catcher Cameron Rupp Wednesday night in Philadelphia.

The pitch came after warnings were given to both benches after the Mets’ Yoenis Cespedes and Kirk Nieuwenhuis and the Phillies Odubel Herrera were hit. The suspension applies to the regular season, so is Robles appeals, he could serve it next year. The Mets are placing a premium on getting home field in the NLDS against Los Angeles, so him serving it this weekend aren’t likely.

Robles drew the ire of the Phillies for quick-pitching earlier this season.



Sep 08

The Mets 2016 Schedule

The Mets released their 2016 schedule. The first things I look for when the new schedule comes out are the Opening Day opponent, the home opener opponent, and final weekend of the year.

Opening Day is April 4, at Kansas City, which totally stinks. I hate interleague play to begin with, but on  Opening Day it is absurd. In fact, the Mets have two interleague series in April (April 15-17) at Cleveland. This always presents the problems about rescheduling rainouts, or worse, multi-hour rain delays. But, if major league baseball doesn’t care about the comfort and safety of its players, and the comfort of its fans, then I guess I won’t, either.

The home opener is April 8 against Philadelphia. The first homestand has three games each against the Phillies and Marlins. The opener is a Friday and doesn’t have the provision of a built in off day the next day.

Because of the prospect of bad weather, April should be mostly divisional play, which makes rescheduling easier because you know that team will be back. That being said, Cincinnati and San Francisco making their only Citi Field visits in April is also weak.

Besides Kansas City and at Cleveland, interleague play includes the Yankees in back-to-back series (first Citi Field then Yankee Stadium) the first week of August. They also go to Detroit the first week in August and host Chicago the last week in May and Minnesota in mid-September.

Washington comes in May 17-19; July 8-10 and Sept. 2-4.

The Mets have only two West Coast trips, San Diego, Los Angeles and Colorado, May 5-15; Arizona and San Francisco, Aug. 15-21 (they end that trip with three games in St. Louis). From a travel standpoint, they don’t leave the Eastern Time Zone in September. Both scheduling scenarios are huge breaks.

The season ends with back-to-back, three-game series at Miami and Philadelphia. Going under the assumption Atlanta, Miami and Philadelphia will be as bad as they are this season, it is a plus the Mets end of the season with 13 straight games against those three teams. In addition, factoring their records as of today, the Mets have 99 games against teams with losing records.

Starting times have not been announced.

Merry Christmas.


Aug 28

Second Part Of Harvey Gamble Plays Out Friday

Well, the Mets gave Matt Harvey his rest, 12 days to be exact, and it will be interesting to see how he responds tonight against Boston. Harvey missing a start was a two-part gamble. First, there was skipping him in favor of Logan Verrett. The second part is seeing how he would do on extended rest.

HARVEY: Plenty of rest tonight. (AP)

HARVEY: Plenty of rest tonight. (AP)

Harvey has been vocal about his preference working in a conventional five-man rotation where he works on four days rest. He was especially agitated when he lost to the Dodgers in Los Angeles, July 4, while working on eight days rest. On July 20, on nine days rest, he lost in Washington.

Harvey is 1-1 on seven days rest; 6-3 on six days rest; and 3-1 on five days rest. That’s seven losses for Harvey when not working on conventional rest.

When pitchers get too much rest they have a tendency to be overly strong and often overthrow and have a lack of command. You hear it all the time with sinkerball pitchers that they leave the ball up when too strong and need to be a little tired.

As bad as the Red Sox are, they can still hit and the Mets don’t need is for Harvey to be walking hitters in front of guys like David Ortiz.

Harvey has thrown 154 innings this season and including tonight is on schedule to make eight more starts on conventional rest. Assuming he goes seven innings in those games, that’s 56 more or 210 for the season. Using those numbers and how many innings they wanted for him, that leaves zero for the playoffs.

That obviously won’t work.

The Mets’ options are to skip him one or two more times; or severely limit his innings in September. But, with the Mets’ porous bullpen and need to win games – including six more with the Nationals – that’s not a good choice, either.

As the Mets calculate his potential innings for the playoffs, they must figure them through the World Series. They certainly aren’t going to calculate his playoff starts for just the first round. In doing that, the Mets must figure at least six more starts, which is two starts for every playoff round. Of course, they could figure sweeping each round, but this run already has a large dose of fantasy.

The Mets have done a decent job giving Harvey his rest, but not so much limiting his innings. Have I mentioned this before? It goes to not having a concrete program.

Aug 09

A Lot Riding On Wright’s Return

I am cautiously optimistic as I post the following: Mets third baseman and captain David Wright will start a rehab assignment Monday with Class A St. Lucie.

Knock on wood. Don’t walk under a ladder. Throw salt over your shoulder. Cross your fingers. Do whatever it takes to get him back to Flushing soon and in one piece.

WRIGHT: A lot riding on rehab. (AP)

WRIGHT: A lot riding on rehab. (AP)

After winning seven straight, the Mets have dropped their last two to the Rays to fall a scant 1.5 games ahead of Washington. I said it yesterday and will say it again, forget the wild card and go for the division. Wright will help immensely in that regard.

Of all their position players, Wright is the one the Mets can ill-afford to lose the most because of what he represents: he’s their best hitter; he’s a team leader; he’s their biggest investment; he represents the Mets past, present and future.

Yes, there’s a lot riding on this.Wright sustained a right hamstring strain Aug. 14 against Philadelphia, and while on the disabled list was subsequently diagnosed with spinal stenosis, which is a narrowing of the spinal column. After spending most of the summer in Los Angeles undergoing physical therapy, Wright just spent five straight days of baseball activity, which is throwing, fielding grounders and taking batting practice.

What happens tomorrow is what realty counts as it best proximates what he’ll hopefully be doing the remainder of the season and into October – deep into October.

“There’s not much more preparation I can do other than games,’’ Wright told reporters last week when the Mets were in Miami.

Wright’s return is critical to the Mets on a number of fronts. First, if he’s close to form, it gives the Mets’ offense a jumpstart and deepens their bench and batting order.

That’s the most immediate impact.

Secondly, it should help determine the Mets’ offseason priorities: Will they need another third baseman? Will Wright need to change positions? Will a healthy Wright decrease the chances of keeping Daniel Murphy or Kelly Johnson, and possibly Juan Uribe? If Wright can’t make it, was his extension a waste and how will it effect their future spending?

No, this won’t be just a normal roster move when Wright returns. This could be roster, and possibly, franchise defining.


Jul 25

No Question, Alderson Blew It With Turner

There have been numerous personnel mistakes made by Mets GM Sandy Alderson, and at the top includes the decision to cast away Justin Turner after the 2013 season in which he hit .280 with a .319 on-base percentage in 86 games in a reserve role.

TURNER: Alderson blew this decision. (AP)

TURNER: Alderson blew this decision. (AP)

Reportedly, the Mets – Alderson and manager Terry Collins – thought Turner didn’t hustle, but none of his teammates thought so.

Turner ripped the Mets and Jon Niese for two doubles and a homer Friday night, but he would not gloat, although he had every right.

“I mean, I don’t think I need to prove anything to them,’’ Turner told reporters after the game. “I don’t play for them anymore. I play for these guys, and I’m trying to prove it to my teammates and my coaching staff and the organization that I deserve the opportunity that I’m in.’’

The Mets traded two pitching prospects to Atlanta for Kelly Johnson and Juan Uribe, but Turner’s .327 average and 43 RBI would lead the Mets, and his 13 homers would be second.

The Mets could have kept Turner for $800,000 last season, but are now paying over $3 million for Johnson and Uribe.

Turner hit seven homers with 43 RBI while batting .340 with a .404 on-base percentage in 109 games last year and was rewarded with a $2.5 contract for this year.

Turner clicked with Dodgers manager Don Mattingly. For whatever reason, Turner figured it out in Los Angeles and is batting third. Alderson claims to like reclamation projects, but Turner is clearly better than Wilmer Flores and Ruben Tejada.

It is safe to say, Alderson missed on this decision. Big time.