Oct 30

Mets Have No Hesitation In Matz For Game 4

Like Noah Syndergaard Friday, Steven Matz is another young, stud pitcher the Mets wanted to delay bringing up, but instead is now in position to take this World Series into November. Syndergaard overcame early threats to strike out six in six innings and backed by two-run homers from David Wright and Curtis Granderson, the Mets stuffed Kansas City, 9-3, to make this a Series again.

Growing up in Long Island, Matz loved the Mets and dreamed of moments like Game 4 Saturday night. He just never thought he’d commute from his parents’ home to Citi Field to pitch in front of a raucous crowd and nationwide television audience with a chance to pull the Mets even.

MATZ:  Mets to ride him Saturday. (Getty)

MATZ: Mets to ride him Saturday. (Getty)

After all, when you’re 24, single and a pro ballplayer in New York, the mindset is having a bachelor apartment in Manhattan: See: Joe Namath, Walt Frazier and Derek Jeter.

“I always thought about it,’’ said Matz, who made his major league debut with a 7-2 victory over Cincinnati and finished 4-0 with a 2.27 ERA.

“I didn’t know it was actually going to come to truth or whatever. It’s actually amazing. It’s pretty big blessing being here, especially my first year being a part of this team.’’

The Mets will try to get back into the Series with a left-hander who made only six starts. So confident the Mets are in Matz they chose him over Bartolo Colon and Jon Niese, or to bring back Matt Harvey on short rest.

“Matz will pitch Game 4, no matter what,’’ manager Terry Collins said.

Matz, like the others in the Mets rotation, throws hard, which could play into the hands of the Royals’ hitters, whose rep is to put the ball into play against mid-90s fastballs. Matz said he won’t try to fool the Royals with his secondary pitches, but go with his heater.

“I think we all look at every team we face and we have a game plan. That’s what we’re going to do,’’ Matz said. “We’re not going to change anything as far as that. We’re going to sit down and study the hitters and attack the hitters the way we believe we can get them out. So that’s what we’re going to do.’’

If he does, we could be in for a great ride.



Jul 19

Mets aren’t saying it, but Davis done for the year.

Perhaps the Mets learned from Carlos Beltran’s surgery, but there appears no rush to get Ike Davis back on the field for a glimpse of “what do we have for next year.’’

DAVIS: Happier times.

The Mets delayed surgery with Beltran and forced him back, and surgery was eventually needed. This year, Davis is looking at a three-week window to have surgery otherwise his comback next season could be compromised.

Speaking today at the Coleman County Day Camp in Merrick, N.Y., on Long Island, Davis said: “I’ve been out for so long, I need another spring training. I mean, I haven’t done really leg workouts in awhile. I’d have to have another month of just playing again and practicing to be at a level that would help the team. The best-case scenario, I get a couple of weeks in, but I would say the majority odds are probably wouldn’t play this year.

“Obviously, there’s a possibility that I don’t need surgery. We just need it to hear. And, if it doesn’t heal, we have to do something to make it heal.’’

Placing the foot in a protective boot made matters worse as it decreased his blood circulation. Davis is looking at microfracture surgery, which entails drilling tiny holes to increase blood flow and enable the cartilage to regenerate.

Doctors say it is possible to that type of surgery to hear in 12 weeks.


Feb 03

Feb. 3.10: Reyes talkin’ it up.

Mets shortstop Jose Reyes, who appeared in only 36 games last season, has been running sprints at a Long Island training facility and said he’s ready for spring training. And, SNY was there to record the moment for posterity.

“I’ll be ready in 2010,” Reyes said. “I can do everything I did before on the field … I can’t wait to hit a triple.”

Reyes, however, still needs to test his right calf and torn torn right hamstring tendon with baseball drills on both sides of the ball.

“Last year I came back too quickly,” Reyes said. “Everything is in the past. I don’t want to think about it. Now there is no pain. That’s the key. There is nothing to worry about. Everything’s perfect.”