Feb 01

Mets’ Bullpen Still Needs Work

With pitchers-and-catchers two weeks away, the Mets still have work to do with their bullpen. Signing left-hander Antonio Bastardo to a two-year deal. As it is now, the Mets’ bullpen is constructed with closer Jeurys Familia, set-up man Addison Reed, lefties Bastardo, Jerry Blevins and Sean Gilmartin, and right-handers Erik Goeddel, Logan Verrett and Hansel Robles.

CLIPPARD: Still a possibility. (AP)

CLIPPARD: Still a possibility. (AP)

Perhaps the Mets’ biggest pen question outside of depth is Familia. He came out of nowhere when Jenrry Mejia was suspended and developed into a dominant closer. However, he didn’t have a great postseason which begs the question: Did the workload catch up with him?

The Mets haven’t given up on re-signing Tyler Clippard, who appeared in 32 games for them and was 4-1 with a 3.06 ERA. He struck out 26 and walked 10 in 32 innings before running out of gas and losing the set-up role to Reed. Somebody will have to go if Clippard is signed, and the guess here is could be Goeddel.

I’m all for brining back Clippard, but not for two years. I would give him one year plus an option which would kick in based on the number of appearances. If he hadn’t lost steam at the end I would consider it, but not given with what we saw last year.

Bartolo Colon will likely re-join the bullpen when Zack Wheeler comes off the disabled list. Mejia will start the season on the suspended list. It is also possible Rafael Montero could open the season in the bullpen. Should Montero open the year in the minor leagues, the hope here is it won’t be in the rotation but in the

For all the potential of the Mets’ starting rotation, a thin bullpen makes it vulnerable.

 

Dec 12

Mets Have Options For Fifth Starter

The Mets have numerous options to replace Jon Niese as fifth starter, which is another reason why trading him isn’t such a loss. Since a .500 record is considered the bar for a successful fifth starter, Niese’s 9-10 record shouldn’t be too difficult to make up.

COLON: Want him back. (Getty)

COLON: Want him back. (Getty)

And, the most important thing to remember is the Mets will need a fifth starter until Zack Wheeler comes off the disabled list, probably in July.

Their first choice should be bringing back Bartolo Colon, who won 14 games and worked 194.2 innings at age 42.

Colon proved he could work out of the bullpen during the playoffs, which is what his role would be after Wheeler returns. Colon made $10 million last year, but I doubt it will take that much to bring him back.

There’s been little buzz in the market about Colon, but while he’s said he’s open to returning to the Mets, he also said he still wants to start.

Even if Colon doesn’t come back, the Mets have three other internal options, including Rafael Montero, Sean Gilmartin and Logan Verrett.

Verrett had success last year as a spot starter – remember his start in Los Angeles when he replaced Matt Harvey? – and as a Rule 5 pickup Gilmartin proved he could be effective if they lengthen his workload in spring training. However, being a left hander, and with the Mets still needing lefty help in the bullpen, I’d rather have him work in that role.

The guy the Mets really like, and as a side thought, somebody they might want to showcase for a deal at the deadline, is Montero. He’ll be a major spring training story.

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Nov 07

Expect No Trades, No Limits On Mets Starters In 2016

Expect no trades or innings restrictions on the Mets’ 2016 starting rotation. With the anticipated departure of outfielder Yoenis Cespedes, there have been numerous reports the Mets might explore obtaining a bat in exchange for Matt Harvey, Noah Syndergaard, Jacob deGrom and Steven Matz.

HARVEY: Expect no limits in 2016. (AP)

HARVEY: Expect no limits in 2016. (AP)

The Mets attempted to trade Zack Wheeler, who spent the season on the disabled list following Tommy John surgery, but that deal fell through.

“I can’t see it happening,’’ Alderson said this week of a possible trade among the four who were on the postseason roster. “You never know what comes up. But I think it’s unlikely.’’

The Mets attempted to trade Jon Niese in the past and are expected to do so again this winter. If not, he could stay in the rotation until Wheeler is ready to come off the disabled list in July.

If they are able to trade Niese, Logan Verrett or Rafael Montero could slide into the rotation until Wheeler is ready.

The concept of innings restrictions became a hot issue in the second half of the season, but manager Terry Collins said that should not become a topic in 2016.

An innings jump of 30 to 40 innings is considered normal, and is that turns out to be the case all the starters should exceed 200 innings, with Matz reaching about 190.

“We went into the second half of the season with pitching issues that had to be handled and had to be dealt with,’’ Collins said. “Hopefully next year, with what these guys have gone through this year, that won’t be the case. It might be, ‘Hey, look, we want to skip a guy here.’ ’’

 

Sep 27

Niese Volunteers For Bullpen; Could Be Future With Team

Figuring he wouldn’t be in the Mets’ postseason rotation, left-hander Jon Niese volunteered to pitch out of the bullpen, which is manager Terry Collins‘ primary concern for the NLDS against the Dodgers. Collins said Niese approached him ten days ago with the suggestion.

Collins said NIese’s willingness to pitch in relief typifies the attitude of his team.

NIESE: Goes to bullpen. (Getty)

NIESE: Goes to bullpen. (Getty)

“The entire clubhouse was caught up in winning,” Collins said. “They weren’??t caught up in their own stuff. They worried about doing what they thought they needed to do to help the club.”

The bullpen is the Mets’ Achilles Heel heading into the playoffs, in particular, the lack of situational left-hander. Citing an injury history and inability to get loose after his starts, Collins said he didn’t like the idea of using Steven Matz in that role. Today marked the first time the Mets addressed the idea of Matz in relief.

“It’??s one of those things where I wanted to do anything to help the team,” Niese said. “As the season progressed there at the end, there was a need down there.”

It could end up being Niese’s future with the team if he’s not traded.

A Met since 2008, Niese’s time in New York has been one of unfulfilled potential and injuries. At 28, he’s 61-61 lifetime and has two more years left on his contract. However, projecting ahead to next year, the Mets’ rotation figures to be Matt Harvey, Noah Syndergaard, Jacob deGrom, Matz and Zack Wheeler expected to come off the disabled list in July.

The Mets tried to trade Niese last winter, and might try again this offseason if they can can obtain a bat. In the back of GM Sandy Alderson’s mind is if Niese pans out in the bullpen, perhaps he can secure a spot there.

The plan is to use Niese in relief this week, with Logan Verrett getting his start Thursday in Philadelphia. What is undecided is where Bartolo Colon will work in the playoffs. Speculation is Colon will go to the bullpen, especially considering what Collins said Matz working in relief.

As a starter, Niese is adept at working to righties and lefty hitters. He has thrown only one relief inning during his career.

 

Sep 20

Robles Gives Glimpse Of Harvey Limits Nightmare

The horror Mets’ fans envision when it comes to Matt Harvey‘s innings limits surfaced in a disturbing way tonight. Harvey cruised for five scoreless innings, giving up one hit and striking out seven, before giving way to Hansel Robles.

Robles pitched two thirds of an inning and was hammered for five runs by the Yankees. It was the obvious fear whenever Harvey leaves the game.

Of course, there were boos, directed at Robles, at manager Terry Collins for pulling Harvey, for GM Sandy Alderson who didn’t have a definitive plan entering the season, and, at Harvey, who resisted any rest suggestions this summer.

HARVEY: Goes five tonight. (Getty)

HARVEY: Goes five tonight. (Getty)

We’ve been over this several times and the basic criticism is the Mets wanted to limit Harvey’s workload, but Alderson, Harvey, Dr. James Andrews and agent Scott Boras failed to come up with a workable plan.

Boras, Harvey and Andrews had their idea of a limit (180 innings total) and Alderson had his idea (around 190 for the regular season plus the playoffs).

The disconnect between the sides is wide, but the primary finger must be pointed at Alderson, who as the Mets’ chief executive, failed to come up with a concrete plan or stand up to his diva pitcher.

According to the recent, quickly thrown together plan, Harvey was to go five tonight and presumably five in his next two games, and with his playoff workload undetermined.

Barring another historic collapse, the Mets should make the playoffs, but what if there’s a repeat of tonight next month against the Dodgers? In the playoffs, don’t you want to see Harvey go six, or seven, or even eight innings?

Of course you do, and so would Harvey’s teammates. However, the Mets won’t make that commitment and that’s aggravating to all concerned.