Jul 15

Mets Wrap: Bruce Proves His Worth

Jay Bruce continues to show why the Mets should, and shouldn’t, trade him. Bruce’s three-run, first-inning homer, to center was the catalyst in tonight’s 9-3 mauling of the Rockies.

It’s been only two games against a struggling team, so let’s not go overboard on the Mets so far in the second half. That includes rushing to trade the Mets’ most productive hitter, whose 24th homer puts him on pace for 44 homers and 114 RBI.

BRUCE: Most valuable Met. (AP)

BRUCE: Most valuable Met. (AP)

That makes the 30-year outfielder attractive not only to a contender in search of a bat, but also to the Mets in the future as a complement to Yoenis Cespedes, but also a safety net should his injury problems persist.

Quite simply, if the Mets will be contenders next season as they believe, they’ll need to either bring back Bruce or replace his production which won’t come cheap.

Bruce will make $13.1-million this season and will be a free-agent this winter in the off-season, and I’m guessing could be re-signed for $80-million over four years. He’ll draw interest in the trade market, but his contract has a limited no-trade clause that blocks deals to contenders Arizona, Boston, Cleveland, Minnesota, the Yankees and Tampa Bay, and also-rans Miami and Oakland.

The Mets could offer Bruce a one-year qualifying offer, which would either keep him around for another season or net them a draft pick.

LUGO DOES IT ALL: Seth Lugo had one of those Little League games tonight, giving up three runs in 6.2 innings with five strikeouts, and also hitting a home run in the third.

Got a huge laugh when Lugo returned to the dugout to receive the silent treatment. Lugo took it all in stride, including giving air high-fives.

With Jacob deGrom going eight innings Friday and with Lugo’s effort, the Mets’ bullpen has worked just 3.1 innings in the series.

“He got ahead of hitters, changed speeds and kept the ball out of the middle of the plate,’’ was how Collins explained Lugo’s success.

CESPEDES LEAVES GAME: Cespedes left the game in the sixth inning when he jammed his left hip attempting to make a diving catch.

“It was more precautionary than anything,’’ manager Terry Collins said when asked his reasoning for taking Cespedes out of the game. “He felt something in his hip. I doubt he’ll be in there tomorrow.’’

Cespedes said through an interpreter that he left the game because of the score, and believes he’ll be able to play, “but if they want to give me the day off I’ll gladly take it.’’

CARGO DROPOFF: Do you remember when the Mets, before acquiring Cespedes, were interested in Rockies outfielder Carlos Gonzalez? He’s fallen on hard times lately, going 0-for-4 with two strikeouts tonight to see his average drop to .215.

EXTRA INNINGS: Lucas Duda, who like Bruce, will be on the block once the Mets officially put up the “For Sale,’’ sign, drove in two runs with a double. … Mets’ hitters struck out nine times, including four by Michael Conforto.Jose Reyes stayed hot with two hits, including his ninth homer in the eighth.

Jun 21

Happy Fathers Day My Friends

To those in my blogging family, I wish you all a very happy Father’s Day. You have the greatest job in the world and I hope for you all the best on this day and every day.

I was up late last night, tossing and turning and clicked on the television for a little company. I was not about to see a replay of the Mets lose again to Atlanta. I stumbled upon a channel and watched a couple of classic Westerns: The Rifleman and Bonanza. The common thread for these programs was a single man raising a family on his own in the harshness of the Old West.

Ben Cartwright had it better as a wealthy rancher with three strapping sons on the Ponderosa. It was a little more stressful on The Rifleman, where Lucas McCain lived with his young son on a small ranch in rural Kansas.

These programs were broadcast in the last 1950s and early 1960s, and our country’s culture has considerably changed since, including, unfortunately, the devaluation of the American male and father, in particular, by Hollywood.

There are countless stories about single mothers and that’s all good. There are also stories of little Susie having two mothers and not needing a father figure in her life. Fine, that’s the way Hollywood wants it, but Hollywood is not my moral compass.

Men in TV and movies are often portrayed as bumbling buffoons and idiots with no value to society outside of being a punchline. Archie Bunker was written as a bigot, but was a man who left high school to support his family, then went off to war, and finally settled down to raise a family of his own.

He didn’t like or respect his son-in-law, a prototypical liberal who valued everybody and everything except those holding traditional values. Yet, his daughter loved him so Archie let him stay under his roof and helped him through school. And, Archie held a job on the loading dock at the warehouse and then drove a cab to support his family.

Why? Because that’s what fathers did.

I grew up siding with Michael politically, but as I got older developed a respect and admiration for what Archie stood for. Despite Archie’s political and ethnic resentments, he was far more a man than Michael could ever hope to be.

My father was nondescript in a lot of ways in the sense of today’s media, but was a good and decent man who loved and provided for his family. He took me to countless games, including out of school to see the Indians on Opening Day. He took me to a Browns playoff game where we had standing room only tickets and stood in freezing weather. I got my love of baseball from him and he was my Little League coach.

I was pretty good in Little League, but in a testament to his sense of fair play, I didn’t always get to play the entire game, or even start them all, because his rule was everybody got to play.

He did countless things for his family for which I will always remain grateful. He wasn’t a fan of the Rolling Stones, but once took me to see a midnight movie of a Stones concert. How great is that?

I remember him trying in vain to teach me algebra and geometry, and later having “the talk.” As fathers and sons often do, we clashed, but could always talk about baseball and World War II history. When he died, I hope he knew I respected and loved him.

There are a lot of friends in my life who are fathers, including my brother, who is a great dad. I always wonder what kind of father I would have been, and because it is something that will never happen for me, it is a regret.

So Cheers to those in my world who are fathers. You are very lucky.

Jan 24

Mets Blew It With Ike Davis On Many Levels; So Did His Father

Ike Davis’ father, former Yankees reliever Ron Davis, has ripped into the New York Mets. The elder Davis said the Mets screwed up handling his son, which, while correct on some levels, can’t make things any easier for Ike if he stays with the team.

Ron Davis is correct, but partially.

RON DAVIS: Wrong in attacking Mets

RON DAVIS: Wrong in attacking Mets

Yes, he’s correct in that this began not with the Mets’ intent to trade Ike Davis, but for how public they made it.

“I think that’s why the Mets have really screwed up in that situation – because they’ve publicly done it so much,’’ Ron Davis said. “It’s saying to my son, `Hey, we don’t want you anymore.’ ’’

Well, yes and no.

The issue isn’t what it said about Ike Davis, but in what it tells other teams, `We don’t want Ike Davis, but please take him off our hands.’

The first rule in making a trade is to not devalue the talent you’re trying to unload. If you don’t think the player is worth anything, then why would other teams?

Another rule is to understand the value of the talent you’re trying to deal and don’t go in with the idea of fleecing the other team. The teams the Mets were talking to, notably Milwaukee, said GM Sandy Alderson’s asking price – the Brewers’ fifth starter – was too high.

So, the Mets did not want Davis and then asked for too much. But, that isn’t the whole story with how the Mets mishandled Davis.

With Ike Davis coming back from the ankle injury and the virus, the Mets might have rushed him back in 2012. Despite a horrid first half, the Mets didn’t send him back to the minors to work on his mechanics. Instead, they kept him around, a gamble that paid off when he had a strong second half to finish with 32 homers.

IKE DAVIS: Needs to learn to hit.

IKE DAVIS: Needs to learn to hit.

He was even more lost last year, but despite all signs saying Davis needed to go to the minors, the Mets ignored them in the hope of another strong second half. Long after it became apparent Davis was lost at the plate was when they sent him down. Then, they clearly brought him back too soon, which only compounded their mistake.

Alderson also screwed up by not having a defined objective for Davis after the season. Alderson had enough of a sampling of Davis to know what he should do.

That he didn’t want him was clear in the effort to trade him, but that intent should have been understated and with a lower asking price. By this time, teams were waiting out the Mets in hope they would release him. However, Alderson was playing chicken holding out for more.

Then, Alderson blew it more by offering Davis arbitration. Why would they do that for a player they clearly didn’t want?

While the Mets blew it on several levels with Ike Davis, I would be remiss in not calling out Ron Davis on a few things.

OK, you’re unhappy with how the Mets handled your son. Anybody can see that, but ripping the Mets does nobody any good, especially your son. The last thing a major league player needs is to have a Little League father upsetting things in the papers and clubhouse. What could the other players be thinking You want to rip the Mets? Fine. Do it after he’s out of the organization.

Secondly, don’t blame Citi Field for your son’s troubles. His problem is not with the ballpark, but his approach to hitting. Quite simply, he doesn’t know how to hit.

His comment last spring that, “I’m a home run hitter. I like to hit home runs. Strikeouts come with that,’’ tells you all you need to know about Ike Davis as a hitter.

Ron, you were a big league pitcher. Are you telling me you can’t look at your son’s hitting approach and say how you would attack him? C’mon. If you really wanted to help him, you’d study the video and tell him he needs to be more patient, he needs to stop trying to pull everything, he needs to use Citi Field to his advantage and hit balls in the gaps.

That’s how you would help your son. Not by being a Little League father. Ike Davis doesn’t need your coddling; he needs tough love.

Your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to respond. Follow me on Twitter @jdelcos

May 12

Don’t Mind The Mets Today, Save Your Cheers For Mom

Like many of you, my love of baseball started with my dad, who was my Little League coach – from T-Ball to high school – took me to the Indians games, and watched the Game of the Week with me. There was usually a game on TV in our house.

However, my mom also helped nurture my love for the sport. She drove me to my games and practices, gave me nickels and dimes to buy baseball cards, and watched me play ball in the front yard with the neighbors. We chewed up the lawn, but she and my dad never said anything.

One of my most endearing memories of her was how he cheered for me at my games. One time, halfway through one of my few home runs, rounded second base heading for third when I looked up and saw her behind the base jumping up and down and screaming for me to run.

I smile when I think about that moment. When I gave her eulogy, it was one of the things I spoke of. Sadly, I never told her about that and how good it made me feel. I just kept the memory with me through the years.

I know many of you have similar memories of your mother and hope you’ll let her know today how important she is to you. Pull yourself away from the Mets’ game – even though it is a Matt Harvey start – and take her to brunch.

So, all of my best to you and your moms today and every day. Today is her day, but every day should be about her.

Have a great day.

 

May 13

Mets And Mothers

While tradition is fathers and sons watching baseball, mothers also play an important role.

My mother was as instrumental as my father when it came to fostering my love of baseball. It was mom who drove me to my Little League games and practices. It was my mom who also brought home a pack of baseball cards when she went to the store.

My mother didn’t understand the nuances of the sport, but she knew my favorite teams and players. When the World Series was played in the afternoon and I couldn’t watch it, she would tell me the final scores when I got off the bus.

I miss my mom, but my love of her does live on a bit as I still follow baseball.

I wish all you have a Happy Mothers Day and do something special to her.

For those moms who might be watching the Mets this fine afternoon, here’s the starting lineup:

Andres Torres, cf
Kirk Nieuwenhuis, lf
David Wright, 3b
Lucas Duda, rf
Daniel Murphy, 2b
Ike Davis, 1b
Ronny Cedeno, ss
Rob Johnson, c
Jon Niese, lhp