Jul 25

Harvey Tries To Get On Track Against Dodgers; Lineups

Matt Harvey hopes to put the brakes on a skid that began in mid-May when the Pirates roughed him up for seven runs in four innings. Harvey, once the epitome of control and avoiding the long ball, walked two and gave up two homers that day.

Including that game, Harvey gave up eight homers in four starts. For the most part, he avoided the home run since, giving up just two in his next six starts. However, his control has been terrible as he’s walked 16 in his last five starts.

Here’s the lineup for Harvey’s start tonight against the Dodgers:

Curtis Granderson, RF

Ruben Tejada, SS

Daniel Murphy, 3B

Kelly Johnson, 2B

Lucas Duda, 1B

Michael Conforto, LF

Kirk Nieuwenhuis, CF

Kevin Plawecki, C

Matt Harvey, RHP

LINEUP COMMENTS: Interesting to see Tejada in the lineup when the expectations were he’s sit for Wilmer Flores However, if based on recent production it was the right call. … Newcomer Johnson is hitting clean-up with Duda dropping to fifth. … Nieuwenhuis playing over Juan Lagares, which is another good call.

 

Jun 03

Could Outfield Be Long-Term Spot For Wright?

Reader EddieMetz threw out this idea of a possible long-term solution for the Mets about injured third baseman David Wright. The more I thought of it, the more I believe it could be a plausible idea. EddieMetz believes a permanent solution could be moving Wright to the left field.

It could work, because in the long-term third base probably won’t make it for Wright, who, including this year, will make $107 million through the 2020 season. If Wright can’t play the Mets will recover some of that money through insurance, but it would entail a giant step back in their rebuilding program.

WRIGHT: Could outfield be eventual spot for Wright? (Getty)

WRIGHT: Could outfield be eventual spot for Wright? (Getty)

A lot of players moved from the infield to the outfield, among them Mickey Mantle, Pete Rose, Ryan Braun, Kevin Mitchell and Robin Yount. Wright is a good athlete and in left field the ball would be coming at him at the same angle. Wright also can run and has a strong enough arm. If he takes to left field, it would have a lot less stress on his back.

Meanwhile, third base requires considerable crouching, maybe up to 150 times a game, and there’s a lot of diving at the position. As for who will play third base, there’s Wilmer Flores or Daniel Murphy.

The Mets must seriously consider this because Wright will likely come back late in the season which might not allow them much time to judge his health. The Mets must be proactive because it impacts their offseason thinking, notably what free-agent third base options are available. Alberto Callaspo, David Freese, Casey McGeheee, Aramis Ramirez and Juan Uribe will be on the market. Ramirez is getting older (he’s 36), will be pricey (he’s making $14 million this year) and is on a downhill slide; Freese isn’t the player he was with the Cardinals; and the others aren’t appealing.

It might be more prudent – and cheaper, which always appeals to the Mets – to bring back Murphy (he’s making $8 million this year), than to throw money at an unknown. It is currently believed Murphy will not be brought back.

And, considering their investment in Wright, it will be better to move him to a less stressful position physically than to keep putting him at third base, where the odds increase yearly of him being injured.

I’m not worried about this stunting the development of prospects Michael Conforto and Brandon Nimmo, because even if they didn’t move Wright to the outfield, I don’t see either being in position next spring to supplant Michael Cuddyer and Curtis Granderson. If Wright does move to left, Cuddyer and Granderson can platoon in right.

Both Conforto and Nimmo could be ready by the time the contracts expire for Cuddyer (after next year) and Granderson (in two years).

This is a lot to consider, and the Mets better be thinking about it now.

 

May 16

Mets Call On DeGrom To Stop Slide

The other day in Chicago, Mets manager Terry Collins said, “what slide?’’ Well, by the end of tonight, that slide could erase the Mets’ once seemingly comfortable lead over Washington into a half-game deficit.

The Mets are in a 7-13 skid, including five straight losses where they scored just 10 runs while hitting .192. In their last two losses, Jon Niese and Bartolo Colon gave up 12 runs in 11.2 innings.

Asked to stem the tide is Jacob deGrom, loser of three of his last four starts. That includes giving up four runs and two homers with four walks in a loss Monday at Chicago.

His problem has been fastball command that runs up the pitch count.

“It boils down to location,’’ deGrom said after the Cubs lost. “I can’t throw the pitches I want for strikes and make some mistakes over the plate and they seem to hit a long way.’’

DeGrom will especially be wary of keeping Ryan Braun in the park. Braun homered twice Friday as Milwaukee mugged Colon.

DeGrom’s opponent is Matt Garza, who has thrown four straight quality starts. Garza will face this lineup:

Curtis Granderson, RF

Juan Lagares, CF

Lucas Duda, 1B

Michael Cuddyer, LF

Daniel Murphy, 2B

Eric Campbell, 3B

Kevin Plawecki, C

Jacob deGrom, RHP

Apr 16

April 16, Mets Batting Order Vs. Marlins

The Mets will be going after their fifth straight victory tonight against the Miami Marlins. Not once last season did the Mets win five in a row, and only three times did they win as many as four straight games. Their last five-game winning streak was May 26-30, 2013.

The Mets were 11-8 against the Marlins last season, including 6-3 at Citi Field.

Here is the Mets’ batting order tonight:

Curtis Granderson, RF

Travis d’Arnaud, C

Lucas Duda, 1B

Michael Cuddyer, LF

Daniel Murphy, 2B

Eric Campbell, 3B

Juan Lagares, CF

Wilmer Flores, SS

Dillon Gee, RHP

Gee is coming off a 5-3 loss in last Saturday’s 5-3 loss at Atlanta. He has worked at least five innings in his last six starts against Miami, going 3-1 with a 2.84 ERA.

ON DECK: Why I like Dillon Gee.

Nov 07

2012 Mets Player Review: Jason Bay

JASON BAY, LF

PRESEASON EXPECTATIONS: Injured and a bust in the first two years of his four-year, $66-million pact with the Mets, the expectations were mild at best. Even with the fences moved in at Citi Field, nobody really expected him to become the slugger he had been with Boston, when he made the Red Sox forget Manny Ramirez. Bay homered 18 times in his first two seasons with 104 RBI. At least, that’s what the Mets anticipated for a single season. Bay’s injuries limited him to 95 games in 2010 and 123 in 2011, the latter was a concussion sustained when he slammed into the wall at Dodger Stadium. If healthy, the Mets hoped Bay would regain his power stroke and start salvaging his contract. Bay did hit 12 homers and drove in 57 runs in 2011, but had a mediocre .329 on-base percentage and .703 OPS. For his part, Bay was a positive clubhouse presence that always hustled and played defense. But, it is difficult to be a leader when you’re not producing.

2012 SEASON REVIEW: Whatever hopes the Mets might have had in rectifying Bay’s career took a serious hit last summer as another concussion limited him to 70 games. That Mets’ fans cheered Bay’s injury is reprehensible, but boiled down it was a sign of their increasing frustration with him. In many ways, Bay personified the Mets’ second-half offensive collapse. Again, Bay hustled, but only goes so far. He reached base just 41 times (32 hits and 19 walks), but he struck out 58 times, batted .165 with a .237 on-base percentage and .536 OPS. In nobody’s world is that a good season. It got to the point where manager Terry Collins said Bay’s two concussions contributed to him being sluggish at the plate. By the end of the season he was a platoon player.

LOOKING AT 2013: When the Mets signed Bay, they did so despite having a greater need for pitching, both starting and relieving. Above all else, this season represents freedom from Bay’s horrendous contract as they’ll have to pay him $16 million plus a $3 million buyout. After ridding themselves of Bay’s contract and Johan Santana’s ($25 million) after this season, the Mets will have more financial flexibility. There’s no way the Mets can escape the bust label for signing Bay; that became official a long time ago. Since he can’t be traded, Bay’s value to the Mets will be if he stays healthy and produces with power and makes them competitive. Maybe then, might somebody take him of their hands for the second half. But, don’t count on it.

NEXT: Andres Torres