Feb 22

Mets Must Make Decision On Wheeler

Zack Wheeler gets the ball tomorrow against the Braves in their exhibition opener. He’ll get roughly 30 pitches or two innings.

It’s one of five appearances he’ll get this spring to prove his elbow is sound enough for him to make the Mets’ rotation. There’s also been talk about trying him out of the bullpen, or him staying back.

WHEELER: Rotation or bullpen? (AP)

WHEELER: Rotation or bullpen? (AP)

Frankly, I’m intrigued by the possibility of him working out of the pen. I’m aware of the concern over the up-and-down nature of a reliever being an injury risk, just as the probability of breaking down after pitching on consecutive days.

The biggest chance for injury is if the Mets plan for him to start then switch direction and try him out of the pen. Or, do the opposite in working him in the bullpen during spring training then switching gears during the season.

This is what happened with Jenrry Mejia, who bounced around from the rotation to the pen and back again, only to blow out his arm.

It’s too simplistic to say, “Well, he’s a pitcher, just throw the damn ball.’’

There have been plenty of pitchers to go from the rotation to star in the bullpen. Dave Righetti, Dennis Eckersley and John Smoltz all made the transition and starred. Smoltz even went back to the rotation, but the key was it wasn’t done during the season.

I don’t know what the Mets will decide to do with Wheeler, but whatever they do, for this year at least they can’t deviate. Make the decision and stick with it, even if he opens the season in the minors. If they decide to pitch him out of the bullpen, then send him to the minors, he must pitch in relief at Las Vegas.

I’m intrigued by the idea of Wheeler pitching out of the pen. He has a live fastball – his out pitch – and from starting he has a secondary pitch. If he can control his command issues, he could be an effective reliever.

He gets into trouble facing a lineup the third time through when his pitch count rises so maybe being a closer would suit him.

Plus, are you all that convinced Jeurys Familia is a great closer. Both he and AJ Ramos will be free agents in 2019, so it would be beneficial to prepare for them leaving.

Unlike Sandy Alderson, I don’t see the Mets competing this year, so getting some answers would be a good thing.

 

Nov 03

Mets Sign Cabrera, Blevins

As expected, the Mets picked up the one-year, $8.5-million option on Asdrubal Cabrera, an indication of their lack of confidence on David Wright making a successful return from the disabled list.

Signing Cabrera also is clear indication the Mets won’t make a run at free-agent Yankees third baseman Todd Frazier.

“Asdrubal can help us all around the infield,’’ GM Sandy Alderson said in a statement. “The season didn’t end the way we wanted but that didn’t stop him from playing hard right to the very last out of the season. Asdrubal is a great tutor to our younger players and a leader in the clubhouse. We’re happy to have him back.’’

Cabrera, the Mets’ Opening Day shortstop last year, will play third and fill in at second. Cabrera, who asked to be traded last year after manager Terry Collins asked him to play second, has done an about-face.

Being injured, losing a step and your starting job, not to mention getting older will often cause a player re-evaluate his position. The Mets’ inability to trade Cabrera at the deadline also gave him an indication of what the free-agent market could be for him.

“I want to come back here because I feel this team is going to be in the playoffs again really soon,’’ Cabrera told reporters at the end of the season. “We’ve got talent.’’

Despite several stints on the disabled list last season (ligament damage in his right thumb), Cabrera hit .280 with 14 homers in 135 games.

Signing Cabrera doesn’t necessarily preclude the Mets not bringing back Jose Reyes, who is a free agent and can also play second and third, but is a better choice to back-up Rosario.

The Mets also picked up the one-year, $7-million option on lefty reliever Jerry Blevins.

“Jerry always takes the ball,’’ said Alderson. “He was a stable force in our bullpen all year long. With Jerry, the addition of AJ Ramos and having Jeurys Familia for the entire season, we feel we have the nucleus for a much-improved pen. Getting Jerry back makes me a lot more confident about the late innings as we go forward in 2018.’’

Despite the potential of the Mets’ pen, Blevins endorsed bringing back Addison Reed, who was traded to Boston in July but is a free-agent.

“I’d like to see them maybe go out and sign Addison Reed,’’ Blevins said. “We’re going to need some steady, solid arms in the bullpen next year.’’

VEGAS LIKES METS: At least one Las Vegas oddsmaker is banking on the Mets battered pitching staff being healthy next season. Bovada has the Mets at 22-1 to win the World Series, ahead of three 2017 playoff teams: Arizona (28-1), Colorado (40-1) and Minnesota (66-1).

The Mets are listed eighth, behind Houston (5-1), the Dodgers (11-2), Cleveland (15-2), Washington (10-1), Boston, the Cubs and Yankees, all at (11-1).

Oct 10

Mets Matters: Good Minor League News; Don’t Count On Girardi

Call it good news that the Mets purchased the Syracuse Chiefs of the International League, and in two years they will become their new Triple-A affiliate.

That leaves two more years of flying prospects to and from Las Vegas, which they have been doing since 2013. Prior to that, they were affiliated with Buffalo for four seasons, but that relationship soured because the Mets didn’t do enough promotions, such as playing exhibition games there.

Before Buffalo, the Mets were affiliated with New Orleans for two years, and prior to that with Norfolk/Tidewater since 1969.

GIRARDI NOT COMING: Of course, hiring Joe Girardi would be a no-brainer should the Yankees be foolish enough to fire him after the playoffs.

Girardi’s four-year contract expires at the end of this season.

Girardi is everything the Mets would want in a manager, but the same applies to the Yankees.

Of course, the Yankees could low-ball Girardi the way they did Joe Torre and he could walk away.

The Yankees have overachieved this year and by most accounts are one to two years ahead of schedule. So, regardless of what happens tomorrow night in Cleveland, why wouldn’t the Yankees want him back?

NO PROBLEMS WITH NATIONALS WINNING: I have no problems with the Nationals reaching the World Series. Actually, that would be in the best interest of the Mets.

Should the Nationals get to the Series it would be a wake-up call to GM Sandy Alderson as to how far the Mets have to go.

 

Oct 02

How About Collins Overseeing Mets’ Minor League System?

GM Sandy Alderson said Terry Collins is best suited to work in player development. If that is the case, and Alderson is telling the truth that he believes Collins has a lot to offer and he wants to continue working with him, then there is one role for him, and that is to oversee the minor league system with the goal of implementing a “Mets Way.’’

Both Alderson and Collins suggested a need for such a program in recent weeks. Collins did in a roundabout way several weeks ago when commenting about Amed Rosario’s habit of tapping his glove with the ball before throwing to first. That habit cost the Mets a game and Collins wondered why it wasn’t addressed in Las Vegas.

Alderson more conceded the need for such an instructor when he noted several of the Mets’ rookies came to New York with a multitude of bad habits.

Rosario’s habit and Dominic Smith’s brain cramps are just two of the most prevalent. There are others, beginning with pitchers’ inability to throw strikes, and including hitters’ plate discipline, atrocious base running and defensive fundamentals, such as hitting the cutoff man.

Situational hitting and improving on-base percentage also must be improved.

The idea is to teach, beginning with the rookie leagues the same things are expected from the major leaguers.

That way there are no surprises.

However, for this to work Alderson must first implement organizational philosophies on offense and pitching. The pitchers have to be taught to throw inside, the way Rafael Montero was when he was on his hot streak.

Too many of the Mets’ hitters are preoccupied with hitting home runs. Sure, home runs are great, but consider this, the Mets tied Milwaukee for the NL lead with 224 homers, but neither are in the playoffs.

Sep 23

What Did We Learn Tonight From Mets?

So, what did we learn tonight about the Mets’ great experiment involving Noah Syndergaard and Matt Harvey?

As you know, Syndergaard came off the disabled list to start, but only pitch one inning while Harvey continued his rehab in relief.

What we learned is very little has changed:

About Syndergaard: Not a damned thing. Seriously, how could we with only five pitches thrown? This had to be another Sandy Alderson decision. The deciding factor in limiting a pitcher’s workload is innings and not pitches. What can you learn with five pitches? I understand Harvey warmed up, but what would have been the harm of another ten minutes?

What tonight meant was Syndergaard is likely to get another start next weekend in Philadelphia. Maybe they’ll go with the innings in that one.

About Harvey: He gave up three runs on four pitches in four innings. The first two were scoreless, which would have been encouraging if the bullpen was his destiny, something that should be considered.

Harvey gave up two homers and has given up 20 homers in 88.2 innings.

“It’s frustrating to struggle and not know why,’’ Harvey said.

We know why … he’s just not good these days.

The Mets’ bullpen: The Mets used NINE pitchers tonight. Jeurys Familia pitched again and was very effective, but should have gone out for the tenth inning.

Lefty Josh Smoker was also effective and I liked that manager Terry Collins let him pitch to a right-handed hitter.

Daniel Murphy rocked again: Murphy hit his ninth homer off Mets’ pitching, including the game-winner in the tenth inning. He also doubled.

The defense of Dominic Smith and Amed Rosario: Smith saved Rosario a throwing error, something he’s already done for the Mets and Las Vegas. Rosario continues to pump his glove before throwing, something that already cost the Mets since he was brought up from the minors. He’s been told about his throwing already since his promotion. Makes me wonder why he wasn’t told while at Las Vegas.