Jul 13

Mets’ First Half Disappointments; Don’t Forget Pelfrey

No evaluation of the Mets is complete without a list of disappointments. While 46-40 at the break, the Mets have more to be happy about than not.  However, that doesn’t mean there aren’t laments.

PELFREY: Gone?

Had everything broken right in the first half, the Mets could be sitting on top of the NL East.

Here’s what went wrong:

The struggling bullpen: Most of Sandy Alderson’s off-season tinkering was made with improving the bullpen in mind. Frank Francisco has pitched well enough, but is a house of cards. He’s coming off a strained oblique, so there are no guarantees in the second half.  Set-up man Jon Rauch has also been hurt an ineffective.

Mike Pelfrey’s injury: Considering how well the Mets’ rotation has performed, is this a disappointment?  You’d have to say yes, because a well-functioning Pelfrey should be worth at least five victories. Compounding the disappointment is the injury to Dillon Gee, which could keep him out the remainder of the season.

Dillon Gee’s injury: Gee will have surgery to repair an artery in his shoulder Friday and could miss the rest of the year. The Mets have little depth in the farm system and are reluctant to part with their premier prospects.  The Mets, who will temporarily patch things with Miguel Batista, have two weeks before the trade deadline.

Jason Bay’s slump and injury: Is it really a disappointment when the expectations were so low to begin with? Probably not, but the team severely lacks right-handed pop. Bay should be activated from the disabled list within the next two weeks. GM Sandy Alderson said the need for right-handed power must be supplied from Bay. On a positive note, Bay’s injury should keep him from getting the at-bats needed for an option to kick in.

Ike Davis’ slump: Davis is starting to hit, but struggled most of the first half, almost to the point of the Mets considering sending him down to work on his swing. Their thinking in not doing so was the belief he already knows how to hit minor league pitching.

Andres Torres’ slump and injury: The Jose Reyes and Angel Pagan gone, Torres represents what little speed the Mets possess. Kirk Nieuwenhuis filled in well, but struggled the past three weeks.

Jun 26

Mets Matters: Bay Update

The more I think about it, the more aggravated I am about last night. Not so much that they lost, but in Terry Collins bringing up the possibility of a let down because of a late arrival into Chicago. It was a self-fulfilling prophesy. Think it and it might come true.

The bottom line is travel in MLB is blatantly unfair, but it is an issue that must be dealt with by all. Adversity is something a championship caliber team must overcome.

Among the Mets notes:

* Jason Bay has been cleared to work out on a stationary bike. If there are no concussion symptoms he can run and resume baseball activities this weekend in Los Angeles. Once again, the Mets have been getting production elsewhere so there’s no need to rush him back.

* Collins said Johan Santana’s starts won’t be cut short like the Nationals will do with Stephen Strasburg. The Mets will go with a five-man rotation the rest of the way. Santana is on a 115-pitch limit, and at the start of the season Collins said 28 starts would be ideal. He’s on pace for that, and if he can get to 32, it could translate into a good season for the Mets. That is, if he gets bullpen support.

* Although Daniel Murphy has been sitting against lefties, Collins said it isn’t permanent. Actually, that’s up to Justin Turner. If he hits lefties when he plays, he’ll continue to get time. Pretty simple, really. Murphy is homerless in his last 347 at-bats.

Here’s tonight’s lineup:

Kirk Nieuwenhuis, cf

Ruben Tejada, ss

David Wright, 3b
Lucas Duda, rf
Ike Davis, 1b
Scott Hairston, lf
Daniel Murphy, 2b
Josh Thole, c
Dillon Gee, rhp

Jun 21

Jason Bay Injury Could Benefit Mets

Nobody wants to see a player injured, and despite his lack of production I haven’t heard anybody say a negative thing about Jason Bay.

However, in the wake of his latest concussion, which could keep him out indefinitely, this could turn out to be one of the best things to happen to the Mets.

If Bay was hitting as they hoped, things would be different. However, this is a young team that is winning and developing a chemistry. They’ve stumbled at times, but find themselves over .500 heading into the Yankees’ series.

Having an unproductive Bay in the lineup, just puts a damper on things. And, at his salary they’ll play him and keep somebody more deserving on the bench (Kirk Nieuwenhuis?).

These Mets, with the mediocrity of the National League and wild card) has a chance to compete. And, should they not win, they have shown the mettle to remain competitive.

If Bay can’t earn his keep, then I’m for letting this team develop without him and continue to build.

Jun 19

What Are The Odds That Jason Bay Is Still With The Mets In 2013?

The hits just keep on coming for Jason Bay, and not in a good way. Yesterday, Terry Collins spoke to reporters before the game and said, ”I’m really worried about him”. Bay will be seeing a doctor today and the team will learn if he indeed suffered another concussion, his second in two years. When asked about the possibility of Bay missing the rest of the season, Collins responded, “anything’s possible.”

For now Bay is on the 7-day disabled list, but there is a strong possibility that he may have played his final game of the season. You may recall that Bay missed the final two months of 2010 after suffering his first concussion. A second concussion could keep him out longer than that and the Mets will make sure he doesn’t return until he becomes 100% symptom free.

It’s been one adversity after another for Bay ever since he signed his four-year, $66 million deal with the Mets. Whether it was fighting through his terrible slumps or missing time with a myriad of injuries, there hasn’t been much to smile about since his move from Beantown to New York. The frustration began almost immediately and has only snowballed since he first took the field as a Met in April of 2010.

Gone was his tremendous right-handed power. Gone was his great ability to drive in runs in droves. Gone was the intimidating presence in the middle of the lineup. All the things the Mets craved about him never materialized with his new team. Now at 33 and in the throws of a second debilitating concussion, the question many are now wondering is if we’ve seen the last of Jason Bay in 2012? And one more question to consider is this one: Despite one final year left on his ill-fated contract, will the Mets rely on him again in 2013 or will they simply cut him as they did with Luis Castillo and Oliver Perez?

Nobody wanted to see the Mets sign Jason Bay more than I did before the 2010 season. I kept holding out hope that he would turn it around, but how many years can one hang onto the same unfulfilled hope? I wish Bay a speedy recovery and truly hope he can comeback sooner than can reasonably be expected, but this is a different team than the one we had in 2010. Kirk Nieuwenhuis has emerged, Lucas Duda has become a legitimate power source, and soon Matt den Dekker will be knocking at the door.

Even before this latest setback for Jason Bay, I was already putting the odds of him returning in 2013 at less than 50/50. I’m not looking to kick a player and a great guy while he’s down, but I am curious to know how many of you think Jason Bay will be the Opening Day left fielder for the Mets in 2013.

Get well soon. Jason…

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