Apr 14

Harvey Needs To Be Smarter For Mets

If you’re the Mets, you want more from Matt Harvey than he gave them last night. Yes, they won and he got the decision, but you need more from your ace.

You want Harvey to be sharper, but you need him to be smarter.

HARVEY: Frustrated despite win. (AP)

HARVEY: Frustrated despite win. (AP)

Harvey looked ordinary after starting with back-to-back strikeouts, but later missed on a couple of pitches in the “sweet spot,’’ zone on homers to lefty hitters Chase Utley and Cody Asche. That happens, but where Harvey was totally off was how he plunked Utley in retaliation for Phillies starter David Buchanan hitting Wilmer Flores and Michael Cuddyer.

Harvey said it was the situation of the game, but he wasn’t believable when he said he “got over amped it got away.”

Everybody knows when a pitcher throws at a hitter he does by throwing behind him. Utley knew it; he never made a move toward Harvey and didn’t even stare him down, unlike what the pitcher did with him.

Of course, I wouldn’t expect him to admit it as that means an automatic fine, if not a suspension.

Harvey was clearly not happy with the home run, or the RBI single, to Utley. His pitch count was slowly rising – another 90-plus pitches in six innings – and he was getting frustrated. You could see it on his face when the cameras caught him in the dugout.

One expected retaliation, but Harvey must be smarter in picking his spots. Ron Darling and Keith Hernandez – as you expect them – weren’t happy with Harvey. The other apologists at SNY, from Nelson Figueroa on down couldn’t bow enough to him.

Harvey definitely seems off after the delay on the challenge, which the Mets waited to do. You either make the call or you don’t, but you don’t make your pitcher wait and get out of rhythm.

Harvey missed on the home run pitches, but by inches. He’s walked only one hitter in his two starts compared to 17 strikeouts, so you know he can locate when he has to. It was clear that ball didn’t get away; Harvey knew where it was going.

In a close game and a runner on third, you don’t hit Utley. It was blatantly obvious. What if the umpire ejected him right there? What if he missed and the runner scored?

This came right after pitching coach Dan Warthen went to the mound, and there was no way he told Harvey to hit Utley. Harvey, as he frequently likes to do, acted on his own.

Earlier today I wrote how Harvey’s presence gives the Mets a chance to win. Tonight, he gave them a chance to lose.

Harvey actions weren’t the lone dark spot on what was a bright night in a bizarre game at Citi Field.

In the long term, David Wright had to leave the game with a pulled hamstring sustained while stealing second in the eighth inning.

“A couple of feet before I got to the bag I felt my hamstring grab,” Wright said. “I thought I could stretch it out but I couldn’t. I didn’t want to make the same mistake I made a couple of years ago.”

Wright will undergo a MRI Wednesday morning and the Mets are expected to bring up Eric Campbell from Triple-A Las Vegas.

 

 

Mar 06

Harvey’s First Inning … Perfect

Matt Harvey struck out the first hitter he faced Anthony Gose. Got the second, Jose Iglesias, on a one-bouncer back to the mound and the third, Rajai Davis, grounded out to first.

It was an easy inning as he threw only 10 pitches. Ron Darling said Harvey was stepping on the gas, which Keith Hernandez confirmed, saying he was at 96. It is important to note neither said Harvey was overthrowing as he kept the same compact delivery he always had.

 

Feb 17

Mets’ Numbers To Be Retired; Don’t Forget Kranepool

Well Adam, since you asked, yes I have several Mets in mind, including an iconic figure who often gets lost in the franchise’s lore, who should have their numbers retired. In his daily “Morning Briefing’’ column ESPN’s Adam Rubin proposed the question what Mets should have their uniform number retired.

His piece came on the heels of an article written by The New York Post’s Kevin Kiernan suggesting Mike Piazza have his No. 31 retired. I have no argument with Kevin on Piazza, who after all, could be in Cooperstown next year or the following.

KRANEPOOL: Don't forget No. 7

KRANEPOOL: Don’t forget No. 7

Everybody suggests Piazza, so that’s not a surprise, and there are those pushing for the foundation players of the 1980s teams: Keith HernandezGary Carter, Darryl Strawberry and Dwight Gooden. If you will, they were the Mets’ Core Four from that era.

I’m all for those guys having their numbers on the outfield wall at Citi Field, but the one guy I’d like to be the first to endorse is Ed Kranepool. Yes, you read correctly.

Kranepool is the first Met I remember growing up, then came Tom Seaver and Jerry Koosman. By the way, I think Koosman also gets overlooked as a significant Met, and yes, his No. 36 should also be on the wall.

Let’s talk about Kranepool for a moment. Is he a Hall of Fame player? No. However, he made his debut in 1962 as a 17-year-old and for much of the 1960s and 1970s, was a key offensive force for the Mets.  He ranks in the top ten in franchise history in games (1st, 1,853), at-bats (2nd, 5,436), runs scored (9th, 536), hits (2nd, 1,418), doubles (2nd, 225), triples (10th, 25), homers (10th, 118), RBI (614) and walks (8th, 454).

Many of those numbers have been dwarfed, but for a long time many of the records belonged to Kranepool, and for that, he should be honored.

The Mets’ history will always lag behind that of the Yankees because the latter has over a 50-year head start. However, the Mets have their own history and it should be recognized. Kranepool is part of that history.

So, 25 years from now, when some seven-year-old kid – 7 was Kranepool’s number – asks his grandfather about the numbers on the wall, I want one of his memories to be that of Kranepool.

 

Jun 07

Mets Can’t Project Anything From Top Draft Pick Dominic Smith

There are a lot of things you can make of the Mets’ selection of high school first baseman Dominic Smith – all of 17 years old – with the 11th overall pick in the draft.

The first is the obvious, that the Mets are no longer enamored with Ike Davis, but that’s the knee-jerk response. However, remember Smith, at 17, has to be at least three to four years away.

SMITH: Mets' future at first? (MLB)

SMITH: Mets’ future at first? (MLB)

It isn’t as if Smith was the No. 1 overall pick with the can’t-miss status of Bryce Harper.

At least, if you’re using the Mets’ recent drafts of position players as indicators, don’t expect Smith at Citi Field any time soon. By that time, Davis might have figured out his swing.

Mets scouting director Tommy Tanous said Smith’s swing reminds him of Rafael Palmeiro and Will Clark. Speaking of great swings, I would have thought Tanous might have mentioned Keith Hernandez.

“It’s a traditional swing as far as his hands work very well,’’ Tanous said. “This is as ‘handsy’ a hitter as you’re going to find. He can get his hands to the ball and get inside the ball as well as anybody I’ve seen as an amateur.

“He can actually be caught out front of some balls, be out ahead of the ball, and still barrel the baseball. It’s an extremely smooth swing. His legs stay under him. His head never moves. It’s really, really a flawless bat path once he gets to the ball.’’

If Smith could have remotely the career of Clark, Palmeiro or Hernandez, the Mets would have done very well.

For his part, Smith said all the right things without the braggadocio from the Jets’ pick of quarterback Geno Smith.

“That’s a great compliment,’’ Smith said. “Hopefully I can live up to it, or just live up to the best Dominic Smith I can be. And hopefully I can help the Mets win a World Series.’’

That’s all well and good, but the success rate of baseball draft picks is less projectable than those in the NFL and NBA, and it’s not as if there aren’t a lot of busts in those sports, too.

I’m not saying Smith will be a bust or not, just that the draft is a crapshoot and it is far too soon to predict anything.

METS SHOULD BAG TONIGHT: The forecast tonight isn’t good for tonight’s game against Miami, which is a Matt Harvey start.

They don’t want to waste it by having him begin the game and then potentially sit through a long rain delay.

The side benefit would be not having the fans sit through the lousy weather, unlike those who sat through four hours in a recent Kansas City-St. Louis game.

The Marlins will be in later this year so it would be easy to reschedule.

As always, your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to answer them. Please follow me on Twitter @jdelcos