Nov 03

2012 Mets Player Review: Ike Davis

IKE DAVIS, 1B

PRESEASON EXPECTATIONS: After sitting out most of 2011 with what can best be described as a bizarre ankle injury, Ike Davis reported to spring training optimistic, only to be slowed by a virus that sapped his energy and strength. The Mets had always loved Davis’ power potential when he slugged 19 in his first season and finished seventh in the Rookie of the Year voting. He got off to a fast start last season and was on a 30-homer pace when he had seven by the time he was injured in an infield collision with David Wright in Colorado. When Davis first came up, he quickly impressed with his patience and ability to go to the opposite field. But, by the end of that season they were semi-concerned about his strikeouts (138) but more enamored with his potential.

2012 SEASON REVIEW: The 2008 first-round pick was anxious to put his injuries behind him, but got off to a miserable start, going hitless in his first five games and finishing April batting .185 with three homers and seven RBI. Davis was chasing everything out of the strikezone and barely sniffed a walk. The more he struggled the more he tried to pull and pitchers toyed with him. Davis didn’t reach .200 until June 27, and didn’t stay over it for good until July 4. Davis began to find his power groove after the All-Star break, ironically, at a time when the overall Mets’ offense went into a tailspin. Davis finished the season hitting .227 with a .308 on-base percentage and .771 OPS, 32 homers and 90 RBI. One has to wonder had he hit just .250 what that might translate into additional run production. Strikeouts were again a problem with 141 and only 61 walks.

LOOKING AT 2013: Last season ended with Davis the topic of trade rumors, particularly to Boston. The  Mets deny it, but Davis, 25, made only $506,690 last season. He’s affordable, young and still loaded with potential, making him one of the few marketable Mets. However, those reasons make him exactly the type of player the Mets should build around, so I don’t see him going anywhere, especially with Lucas Duda – his potential replacement at first – so unproven. There remain a lot of holes in Davis’ offensive game. He’s largely undisciplined and should add at least 50 points to his on-base percentage. By being more selective, he would invariably add to his power numbers. With Davis and Wright hitting back-to-back, the Mets have decent power in the middle of their line-up.

NEXT: Daniel Murphy

Jun 14

Is there a reason to bring Santana back this season?

Come on, did you really expect smooth sailing on Johan Santana’s rehab and comeback attempt for this season?

SANTANA: Will we see him again this year?

Santana shut it down about ten days ago after complaining of soreness in his surgically-repaired left shoulder. He is back to long-tossing on flat ground with the hope of returning to the mound later in the week. Considering how long it took Santana to graduate to the mound from flat ground initially, that’s an ambitious goal.

GM Sandy Alderson said the Mets’ recent success from their rotation removes the urgency to bring back Santana quickly. That comment brings about an interesting conclusion question: If the intent is to bring Santana back soon, shouldn’t the assumption be they are doing it because they believe they can compete for the playoffs, and if this were true, then what is the point of dealing off players at the deadline?

The only other conclusion I can draw from wanting Santana back soon is to ascertain his health with the purpose of dealing him and the remainder of his contract, which is for $24 million next year and $25.5 million in 2013. The Mets hold a $25 million option for 2014 or a $5.5 million buyout. Only a healthy Santana can be traded.

The rehab guideline is to bring Santana to a point where he would be at physically to start spring training, which is a six-week progress.

Conservatively, I would estimate at least another three weeks, barring further setbacks, to where he would reach that point. Such a projection would put us at around July 4, and six weeks on top of that would bring it to around mid-August.

If it lasts much further than that, I wonder it the Mets would consider not bringing him back at all this year. If the team is out of contention, the only reason would be to see where he stands physically in preparation for 2012. And even then, the window would be fairly small to make an accurate decision.

 

Sep 29

Santana voted NL Pitcher of the Month

He had Cy Young stuff but not much support.

He had Cy Young stuff but not much support.

Johan Santana was voted the NL Pitcher of the Month this afternoon. He was 4-0 with a 1.83 ERA in September, including a gutty effort in Saturday’s shutout of the Florida Marlins that only delayed the eventual agony.

Santana gave up nine runs on 39 hits with 47 strikeouts in 44 1/3 innings. He only walked 13.

With the way Santana finished the season, it is hard to believe he was booed in the first half. He’s been lights out since early July.

-Since July 4, was 9-0 with a 2.09 ERA in 17 starts. He allowed three runs or less in 16 of these starts.

-Santana was 6-0 with a 1.47 ERA in his last nine starts at Shea.

Sep 28

About Yesterday ….

Santana: Dominant.

Santana: Dominant.

There’s still a buzz around Shea this morning following Johan Santana’s masterful performance yesterday over Florida. Shutouts are rare. Rarer still is the kind of job Santana did yesterday. His roll is why the Mets remain in contention.

Consider:

-Since July 4, he’s 9-0 with a 2.09 ERA in 17 starts. He has allowed three runs or less in 16 of these starts.

-Santana is 6-0 with a 1.47 ERA in his last nine starts at Shea.

-Santana is the first Mets pitcher to throw a complete-game on three days rest since David Cone, Aug. 13, 1990, at San Francisco.

Sep 12

Mets Chat Room: Santana opens series.

Jerry Manuel had his choice of either Johan Santana or Pedro Martinez to open tonight’s series against Atlanta. It was a no-brainer.

He’s the guy if you want to open a series,” Manuel said. “If you had a choice, you would choose, at this point in their careers, Johan.”

In a six-game winless stretch from June 6-July 4, the Mets gave Santana 11 runs. And, with the bullpen coughing up the lead in six of his games, it wouldn’t be a stretch to think that with a little support he could be going after his 20th win tonight. His 2.70 ERA, not 13-7 record is indicative of how well he’s pitched.

Santana prevented the Mets from being swept by Philadelphia last Sunday, easily his most important victory of the season. That game is why they got him.