Dec 10

David Wright Likes Curtis Granderson Signing On Many Levels

LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. – Where Curtis Granderson will fit in with the New York Mets outfield is still to be determined, David Wright has no doubt he does fit with his team.

Granderson is penciled in to hit fourth behind Wright, giving him the protection he hasn’t had since Carlos Beltran and Carlos Delgado were here. Manager Terry Collins doesn’t know which of the three outfield positions Granderson will play, but Wright said wherever he plays, he provides an immediate upgrade.

WRIGHT: Likes Granderson signing on many levels.

WRIGHT: Likes Granderson signing on many levels.

“Curtis instantly makes us a better team both offensively and defensively,’’ Wright said in an email.

Offensively, Granderson hit 40 homers with the Yankees, but even with Citi Field’s spacious dimensions, he should be good for at least 25.

Defensively, he’s a natural centerfielder. Collins hasn’t decided his outfield rotation, but speculation is it will be – from left to right – Granderson, Juan Lagares and Chris Young.

Collins said Granderson should also take pressure off Wright in the batting order.

“I think, number one, they’ve got Curtis hitting behind him now, they’ve got to make a decision,’’ Collins said of opposing pitcher’s plans against the Mets.

“David’s patient enough to take the base on balls, especially if he knows the guy can bat behind him,” Collins said. “He’ll get better pitches to hit each at-bat.  And if David gets pitches to hit, he does damage.’’

Granderson is GM Sandy Alderson’s highest-profile free agent signing, but if things work out as hoped, Wright said it would not be his last. If the Mets get better, other players will notice.

“I think it paves the way for other elite players to want to play for us,’’ wrote Wright, whom Granderson said was influential in him signing with the Mets.

From his perspective, Granderson said one of the reasons he wanted four years was to be around when the Mets’ building plan reached fruition, and that includes signing future free agents.

While Granderson provides Wright protection in the order, he’ll also give him a respite in the clubhouse. Even prior to his appointment to team captain last season, Wright was the clubhouse voice, commenting on an array of issues, ranging from Willie Randolph’s firing in 2008 to the Wilpon’s financial situation to Ike Davis’ plate troubles to Jordany Valdespin’s emotional meltdowns.

Quite simply, he has been the go-to guy for all issues on the Mets.

By all accounts, Granderson will be a positive presence, and Wright echoed what Alderson said earlier today.

“He’s a true professional and great guy to have in the clubhouse,’’ wrote Wright. “He has a confidence about him that I think will rub off on other players.’’

ON DECK: Wrapping up day two of the Winter Meetings.

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Dec 09

Mets Should Consider Trade For Brett Gardner

LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. - The New York Mets rarely trade with the Yankees, but recent developments could make a trade conducive for a Daniel Murphy-Brett Gardner trade.

Better still, it is a trade the Mets should make.

GARDNER: Would help Mets.

GARDNER: Would help Mets.

The possibility is ripe after the Mets signed Curtis Granderson and the Yankees landed Jacoby Ellsbury and Carlos Beltran, but general manager Sandy Alderson isn’t biting.

“Let’s not categorize players quite yet,’’ Alderson told reporters in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. “I mean, I know it looks like, ‘Well, OK, you’ve got this guy and that guy … ‘ But let’s see how it plays out, because I think that’s a little bit unfair to sort of predetermine.’’

The addition of Granderson completes the Mets’ outfield, with Juan Lagares in center and Chris Young in right. The Mets are kicking the tires of moving Eric Young to second base, thereby opening the door for dealing Murphy.

And, with Robinson Cano now in Seattle, the Yankees could use a second baseman, and Murphy’s home run numbers would increase in that ballpark.

The trade has been debunked in several corners, which is all the more reason why it should happen. Teams never disclose whom they are talking trade with, but the Mets have been known to listen to offers for Murphy, who’ll make $5 million to likely price himself off the Mets.

Regardless of how their outfield is currently constructed, remember the Mets could still have holes considering Chris Young is signed for one year.

Gardner and Eric Young would add speed at the top of the order, something the Mets haven’t had in a long time.

Gardner and Granderson would greatly upgrade the Mets’ outfield defense. Pitching and defense were supposed to be the Mets’ foundation when they moved into Citi Field, and Gardner could be a mainstay even after Granderson’s four-year contract expires.

I like Murphy, but if Eric Young is the answer at second base as the Mets might think, this trade is a definite upgrade.

Your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to respond. Follow me on Twitter @jdelcos

 

Dec 07

Curtis Granderson Signing Could Open Door To Daniel Murphy Trade

The signing of Curtis Granderson could give the New York Mets increased trade flexibility.

The Mets’ outfield, a weakness at the start of last season, is now a defensive plus with natural centerfielders – from left to right – of Granderson, Juan Lagares and Chris Young.

MURPHY: On the block?

MURPHY: On the block?

This alignment would relegate Eric Young to the bench, or possibly second base. Should the Mets opt to play young in the infield, it would make Daniel Murphy expendable.

“We’ll entertain anything,’’ general manager Sandy Alderson said in a conference call. “It doesn’t mean we’ll act on everything. The nice thing is that with hopefully a couple players signed, we can entertain a lot of different combinations, and at the same time not feel like we absolutely have to act on one of them.’’

Murphy, arguably the Mets’ most consistent offense presence the past two years, will make roughly $5 million this year through the arbitration process, and could be packaged in a trade for pitching.

If the Mets don’t deal Murphy, it is possible he could play first base if the Mets unload Ike Davis or Lucas Duda, or both.

Perhaps the Mets won’t trade Murphy now, but it is conceivable if Eric Young supplants him at second base, he could be dealt in late July.

Dec 06

What If The Mets Can’t Get Curtis Granderson?

Let’s suppose for a moment the New York Mets don’t sign Curtis Granderson. What then?

There will undoubtedly be cries of the Mets not wanting to spend and others that they don’t have the resources they claimed they had. It is hard to say which is true.

As far as outfielders go, there aren’t a lot of remaining options. We know they won’t bring back Carlos Beltran or pay through the nose for Nelson Cruz or Shin-Soo Cho.

I’ve always like Nate McLouth, but heard nothing in that regard from the Mets. There was some reported interest in Corey Hart, but that has cooled.

What are they going to do, have an encore with Rick Ankiel, Xavier Nady, Jeff Francoeur or Jason Bay?

Honestly, if they don’t get Granderson and aren’t interested in McLouth, they might be better off going with Matt den Dekker, Juan Lagares and Eric Young in their outfield.

There’s some school of thought that if the Mets can’t be competitive this year, they might just wait until next winter to spend. This idea can’t be any worse.

The Mets have been pointing to this winter as one in which they would spend and the fan base bought into that promise. To come away empty again would be destructive and only increase the sense of distrust between the Mets and their fans.

Matt Harvey’s absence this summer isn’t the issue anymore. The Mets must accept that and put a representative team on the field, one in which they can develop for the future, because there’s still the matter of selling tickets and putting a product worthy of watching on television. Currently, they need starting and bullpen help; and outfielder with pop; a shortstop; a back-up catcher; and a decision at first base.

They’ve accomplished none of that with the Winter Meetings three days away.

Even with Harvey, they wouldn’t have filled all these holes this winter. They must fill some holes now because they won’t be able to fill them all next year.

It would have been great to see the Mets compete for the wild card this year. While that likely won’t happen, there’s no reason to believe there can’t be some improvement. They won 74 games in 2013, and for all the good Harvey did, he still had 13 no-decisions.

Surely, one more victory a month could push them to 80 victories or even reach .500. It is possible with some help.

That’s why getting Granderson is important, and even if they don’t, they can’t cash in their chips. It might not be the playoffs, but there is something to play for.

 

Dec 05

Three Years Won’t Be Enough To Get Granderson

The New York Mets are serious about signing Curtis Granderson. But, will the three-year contract that has been |reported be enough?

At 32, Granderson would likely want a fourth year considering what is going on in the market. If Carlos Beltran, who is four years older than Granderson is reportedly talking with Kansas City for a three-year, $48-million contract, it stands to reason Granderson would want an additional year.

GRANDERSON: Talking with Mets.

GRANDERSON: Talking with Mets.

General manager Sandy Alderson said the Mets must adjust to a “robust,’’ market, and that would include the ability to upgrade their initial offer.

The money sounds about right, but the Mets might have to jack up the annual salary if they are adamant about three years. Otherwise, they might have to go three years plus an option, or give in on the fourth year.

Either way, Granderson is the best available outfielder in the market that won’t cripple them financially. Texas’ Nelson Cruz and Cincinnati’s Shin-Soo Cho have reportedly sought deals in excess of $90 million and five years.

The Mets, understandably because of the long-term deals with Johan Santana and Jason Bay that flamed out, not to mention Oliver Perez and Luis Castillo, want to shy away from lengthy contracts. David Wright was the lone exception.

Granderson would be a definite upgrade to the outfield, and despite his propensity for striking out, has the production numbers to offset that problem. He could play left, with Juan Lagares in center and Chris Young in left.

Presumably, Eric Young would play off the bench, or as has been suggested, move to second base if Daniel Murphy is traded. It is also possible Murphy could return to first base depending upon what happens to Ike Davis or Lucas Duda.

A deal is not imminent and Granderson is sure to talk to other suitors. The Yankees said despite their signing of Jacoby Ellsbury they would entertain brining back Granderson.

There are positives to getting Granderson, and his strikeouts differ from Davis’ because he will give something in return.

Granderson knows what it takes to play in New York, so there wouldn’t be that adjustment process. He could even keep his apartment.

Signing Granderson would answer one of the Mets’ numerous questions. They still need to add two starters; build depth in their bullpen; resolve the first base question; and add a catcher to back-up Travis d’Arnaud.

So, even if the Mets sign him, their work won’t be close to being done.