Aug 03

Mets Mishandle Wright’s Injury; Lands On Disabled List

The New York Mets posted their lineup on a bulletin board opposite the door opening into their vast clubhouse and missing is David Wright’s name.

He shouldn’t have been in Friday’s lineup either, and also not in Thursday’s lineup.

WRIGHT: Limping off the field. (AP)

WRIGHT: Limping off the field. (AP)

Once again, the Mets mishandled an injury that has the potential to turn significant. Wright, playing with tightness in his right hamstring this week, strained that hamstring last night and was placed on the disabled list this morning.

As I always say when it comes to Met injuries, bet the over, and don’t think this will just be two weeks.

I wrote prior to the game Wright should sit. It pleases me none to say, “I told you so.’’ Then again, I don’t have to say it to veteran Met watchers as they know, regardless of the manager or GM, injuries and the Mets are never a good mix.

Wright several times – including a slight fracture in his back last year – Ike Davis, Ryan Church, Carlos Beltran, Jose Reyes, Jon Niese and Johan Santana were not handled properly. Beltran was so frustrated and distrustful of how he was being treated that he had surgery on his own.

Actually, that didn’t work out too badly for him, did it?

Earlier this week, Dr. Terry Collins suggested Wright might have been dehydrated.

It has been said nobody knows a player’s body like himself and there is some degree of truth to that, but it is not complete. Nothing ever is.

Wright is notorious for playing through pain, as evidenced by playing for a month with the fracture in his back. If the doctors would had let him, he would have tried to play after being beaned by Matt Cain.

In explaining the play, Collins told reporters: “He just wanted to get extended to try to help us win a baseball game, that’s what it’s all about.’’

Not so fast. Let’s not write this off on Wright busting his butt to make a play. We know that’s what Wright is all about.

But, players are kids. You can’t always trust them, especially when it comes to injuries. These guys have such an ingrained loyalty to their teammates – most of them, anyway, with the exception of say Ryan Braun and Alex Rodriguez, but that’s another issue – that they will play through the pain.

And, players aren’t doctors. What they feel and what they know are two different things.

Since players can’t trust themselves, it comes down to the team, especially the trainers and manager. Nobody ever knows when a hamstring will go, but when there’s tightness or soreness, you always have to judge on the side of caution.

I know Collins wants to win, but this one has to be on him. He should have rested Wright from the beginning and had him undergo some kind of treatment.

If he had, he wouldn’t writing in Justin Turner’s name at third for today.

Here’s today’s lineup:

Eric Young, LF

Juan Lagares, CF

Josh Satin, 1B

Marlon Byrd, RF

Daniel Murphy, 2B

Justin Turner, 3B

Anthony Recker, C

Omar Quintanilla, SS

Jeremy Hefner, RHP

As always, your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to answer them. Follow me on Twitter @jdelcos

Jul 31

Mets Stand Pat At Trade Deadline

The trade deadline passed and as expected the New York Mets did not make a move. In previous seasons when one wondered about the futures of Jose Reyes, Carlos Beltran and David Wright for economic reasons, this time they opted not to be sellers.

With nearly $50 million coming off the books next year because of contracts to Johan Santana and Jason Bay, the Mets say they will be active in the winter, mostly in the free-agent market, but for now want to make the most of this season.

Projected to lose as many as 100 games in some circles, the Mets have their eyes on second place in the NL East and a .500 record. It is not out of line. This was exactly the right thing the Mets did.

“We’re trying to win games here,’’ Terry Collins told reporters in Miami. “We’re not just throwing the season away.’’

The Mets’ inactivity must be interpreted in the positive because their message is they believe they have a competitive core, and the pieces everybody wants from them – notably Bobby Parnell and Marlon Byrd – have greater value in Flushing. If the Mets really believe they can be competitive next season they will need a closer, and Byrd is a positive influence on the field and in the clubhouse. All winning teams need players like him.

Since nearly player goes on waivers during the season to gauge trade interest, it is possible something could happen in August, but for now GM Sandy Alderson’s intent is to see how good this team can be over 162 games, and from there, better formulate his shopping needs.

Pitching is always a need and they now have a positive in Jenrry Mejia, tonight’s starter in Miami, who is coming off a solid, seven-shutout inning performance in Washington last Friday.

Mejia has struggled with injuries over the past three seasons, including undergoing Tommy John surgery. It is not unreasonable to speculate Mejia’s injuries were caused by the Mets bouncing him from the rotation to the bullpen back into the rotation. This was precipitated by then manager Jerry Manuel’s insistence in bringing him north out of spring training in 2010 to work out of the pen.

Only Mejia rarely pitched and when he did was usually ineffective. He was optioned to Triple-A, where he started and eventually injured his elbow.

Mejia starts tonight and if he does well will stay in the Mets’ six-man rotation.

With Jeremy Hefner ineffective over his last three starts and Jon Niese recovering from a slight rotator cuff, there’s potential for things to get dicey in the rotation, making it imperative for Mejia to produce.

Here’s the Mets’ lineup behind Mejia tonight:

Eric Young, LF

Daniel Murphy, 2B

David Wright, 3B

Marlon Byrd, RF

Ike Davis, 1B

John Buck, C

Juan Lagares, CF

Omar Quintanilla, SS

Jenrry Mejia, RHP

As always, your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to answer them. Follow me on Twitter @jdelcos

Jul 29

Could Juan Lagares And Eric Young Be A Viable One-Two?

As the enthusiasm for a strong finish by the New York Mets might have fizzled in Washington, a bright spot continues to be Juan Lagares, raising the possibility of a speedy tandem at the top of the order with Eric Young.

Of course, he needs to show more offensively, but that part of his game is improving and the power might develop as he gets stronger and learns the pitchers better. It must be remembered development also includes adjusting to the pitching when it adjusts to him.

LAGARES: Catch of the year?

LAGARES: Catch of the year?

Lagares’ opportunity came from the collective ineptness of the Mets’ outfield. Currently, he and Young are the only outfielders that could be considered starters heading into spring training.

Lucas Duda might end up at first if he’s still on the team; Marlon Byrd might not be re-signed; Kirk Nieuwenhuis has his moments, but they are sparse.

Lagares is outstanding defensively, and his diving catch where he lost the ball and re-caught it might be one of the best of the season by an outfielder.

The objectives over the next two months for Lagares and Young are to show GM Sandy Alderson his outfield needs aren’t so severe.

Lagares’ average is slowly rising, but his 47-to-7 strikeouts-to-walks ratio must close, and if it does his .299 on-base percentage and .699 OPS would rise. His number projected over 162 games would be 121 strikeouts, 18 walks and 39 doubles.

The number that stands out most with Lagares are 15 doubles in 175 at-bats. Give him 600 at-bats and he would be pushing 45 doubles. If his strikeouts and walk numbers improved, the Mets would have themselves a solid center fielder.

Meanwhile, despite cooling since his hot debut, Young is still a catalyst at the top of the order with a .275 average and .357 on-base percentage in 138 at-bats.

Since the rest of the season is for finding answers, I would like to see if Young and Lagares can complement each other at the top of the order. What is currently preventing that is Daniel Murphy’s ability to work the count and protect Young as a base stealer.

Should Lagares develop in that area, it might be intriguing, and could allow for Murphy to be lowered in the order to give him more favorable RBI opportunities.

That would be important to know if the Mets don’t bring back Byrd, which I see as unlikely. I figure, as with Scott Hairston after last season, the Mets won’t give the player two years.

Jul 28

The Importance Of Jon Niese Pitching Again This Season

Jon Niese began his rehab assignment for the New York Mets with two inning to recover from a partially torn rotator cuff and might not be available until late August if not early September. While it might be tempting to shut him down for the remainder of the season, there is an importance of him pitching again this year.

NIESE: Needs to pitch this year. (AP)

NIESE: Needs to pitch this year. (AP)

First, for Niese’s peace of mind, he’d like to enter the offseason with an idea of where he stands physically. This makes mapping out his winter conditioning and throwing programs easier and alleviates a repeat of what happened last year with Johan Santana.

The more information the Mets know about Niese the better, not only for the left-hander’s off-season training, but also for their shopping lists. If they suspect a strong return from Niese, that could give them the freedom of making a trade.

How much Niese will pitch the rest of the season, nobody knows, but getting out there is important because it alleviates the wonder and there’s nothing more frustrating for a pitcher to be sitting home in December and January and thinking if he should start throwing.

ON DEALING BYRD: I have been against the Mets dealing Marlon Byrd because I’d like to see how strong they could finish as to get an idea of what to do in the off-season.

After being 15 games below .500, they cut that to seven games under after winning the first game of Friday’s double-header, but with a loss today they will again be ten games under.

The Mets have made it clear they don’t want to deal Bobby Parnell, which makes Byrd their most sought after player.

However, Terry Collins said this morning he doesn’t expect anything to happen by Wednesday’s trade deadline.

“You look at our team, and right now we’ve got some guys that are playing good,’’ Collins told reporters in Washington. “And I don’t know what’s going to happen the next three days. … If I was a team that was in a hunt, who had a couple of holes, I’d go searching and we’ve got some guys. But from everything I’m hearing right now, there’s no reason to think we’re going to change.’’

 

LINE-UP VS. NATIONALS

Here’s today’s lineup:

Eric Young, LF

Josh Satin, 3B

Daniel Murphy, 2B

Marlon Byrd, RF

Ike Davis, 1B

John Buck, C

Juan Lagares, CF

Omar Quintanilla, SS

Carlos Torres, RHP

As always, your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to answer them. Follow me on Twitter @jdelcos

Jul 20

Zack Wheeler Tries To Get Mets On-Track

Well, so much for that fast start out of the second-half gate for the New York Mets.

That great ERA Jeremy Hefner was sporting going into the game? Not so much anymore. The Phillies nailed him for eight runs on ten hits. The carnage was accumulated over 63 pitches, 38 of them in the first inning.

HEFNER: Hammered by Phils, again. (AP)

HEFNER: Hammered by Phils, again. (AP)

The first inning and the Phillies have not been a good mix to Hefner over the years, and before you knew it, the Mets were down 11-0.

Terry Collins tried to put a positive spin on the rout.

“I’ll tell you what, down 11-0, make it a game, pretty impressive by our guys,’’ Collins told reporters after the game, most of who had their storied written by the fifth inning.

Uh huh. Forty years in the game should know by now there are no morale victories in baseball. Few of them, anyway, and last night wasn’t one of them.

Unfortunately for the Mets, them chopping away at the lead provided the illusion there was a chance, and consequently Collins had to go to his bullpen for seven innings.

Otherwise, Collins might have left Hefner in to take his lumps for the team to save the bullpen.

Either way, it was a hot, muggy miserable night, one better spent watching The Great Escape on the Military Channel.

Nonetheless, it is only one game and the Mets have their two of their best, Zack Wheeler and Matt Harvey, going the next two games of this series. After that, it’s four more home games at home against Atlanta before hitting the road to Washington and Miami before the trade deadline.

So, there’s plenty of time for the Mets to make a run at .500 and make the second half of this season worthy of watching. The last four years after the break effectively ended the competitive part of their season.

Was there anything good out of last night’s game?

Juan Lagares had a good at-bat and Ike Davis had a couple of hits. Kirk Nieuwenhuis looked like Mr. Magoo in center field. Other than that, not too much.

I wasn’t crazy about Collins’ managing last night. David Wright did homer in the ninth, but after a busy All-Star break, he should have been pulled and given a rest. The same goes for John Buck, who cramped up.

Here’s today’s lineup against Cole Hamels:

Eric Young, LF

Daniel Murphy, 2B

David Wright, 3B

Marlon Byrd, RF

Josh Satin, 1B

Juan Lagares, CF

Anthony Recker, C

Omar Quintanilla, SS

Zack Wheeler, RHP

As always, your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to answer them. Please follow me on Twitter @jdelcos