Oct 29

2012 Mets Player Review: Situational Lefties Josh Edgin And Robert Carson

 JOSH EDGIN, LHP

PRESEASON EXPECTATIONS: The San Francisco Giants are World Series champions this morning in large part because of their bullpen, which included situational lefties Jeremy Affeldt, Javier Lopez and Jose Mijares. The team they defeated, Detroit, had Phil Coke in that role. Most of the playoff teams had dependable lefthanded relievers. When the Mets went to spring training, a situational lefthander was a huge void they expected only Tim Byrdak to fill, which put them at a disadvantage. Byrdak bounced around with Kansas City, Baltimore, Detroit and Houston before finding a home with the Mets in 2011, when he appeared in 72 games and struck out 47 hitters in 37.2 innings. Meanwhile, other lefties in the Mets’ system, Josh Edgin and Robert Carson, were simply blips on their radar. Perhaps they’d get called up in an emergency or in September. Either way, neither was counted on for this season.

WHAT THEY GOT:  By his own admission, manager Terry Collins said he overworked Byrdak, who, like Pedro Feliciano before him, landed on the disabled list with arm problems. Byrdak appeared in 56 games and threw 30.2 innings. A reliever’s workload is more than innings, it is appearances, and with each appearance comes one or two times warming up in the bullpen. The Mets monitor warm-up pitches in the bullpen and knew Byrdak approached a dangerous limit. Eventually, those pitches took a toll and Byrdak was burned out. The strain was more magnified because he was the only lefthander. The Mets eventually replaced him with Carson and Edgin, both of whom performed well in spots. Edgin threw 25.2 innings in 34 games, and allowed seven of 23 inherited runners to score, a number that needs improvement. Carson has outstanding stuff, evidenced by a Sept. 12 appearance at Washington when he inherited a bases loaded-no outs situation an escaped unscathed. They lost that game, but it was arguably the Mets’ best appearance by a reliever all season. Only one of Carson’s six inherited runners scored.

LOOKING AT 2013: Admittedly, the windows of performance from Edgin and Carson are small, but both are inexpensive options for next season. As the Giants proved, having more than one lefty specialist is essential. The Mets abused Feliciano and Byrdak because they had nobody else, but having two will ease the burden, especially because they seem safe in the eighth and ninth innings with Bobby Parnell and Frank Francisco. Both will likely go into spring training with a spot on the staff. It has been a long time since the Mets had two dependable lefty relievers on the same staff.

Oct 16

Mets Cut Justin Hampson From 40-Man

Mets lefty reliever Justin Hampson has been removed from the team’s 40-man roster and has opted for free agency.

Hampson, 32, appeared in 13 games with the Mets in 2012, his first major league action since his time with the Padres in 2008.

The Mets southpaw had a seriously good season in Triple-A Buffalo where he appeared in 51 games and pitched to a 2.33 ERA while striking out 59 batters and walking just 22.

Hampson would be a solid option for many a major league bullpen, and wherever he lands in 2013, we wish him the best. He’s a class act.

The Mets are counting heavily on Josh Edgin and Robert Carson to fill the left-handed void in the bullpen next season, and with so many other bigger problems on their plate, don’t expect that to change..

Sep 20

Harvey Scintillating In Finale; Mets Blow It Late

As the zeroes piled up, this thought surfaced: Matt Harvey and Cole Hamels in an old fashioned pitcher’s duel. If the Phillies weren’t the only ones with a postseason pulse there would have been real electricity in the air.

HARVEY: Something special. (AP)

As it is, it was something to look forward to.

Harvey gave up a homer to Jimmy Rollins on the game’s fifth pitch, but was lockdown after that, not giving up a hit and striking out seven in seven innings. As we’ve grown accustomed to Harvey’s strong pitching, he probably has grown used to how the game unraveled as the Mets scored two runs – a club-record 15th straight game in which they’ve scored three or fewer runs – and the bullpen imploded again.

This time, it was the heretofore impressive Josh Edgin giving up a game-winning homer to Ryan Howard.

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Jul 12

More Bad News For Gee; Could Be Done For Year

Dillon Gee will undergo surgery Friday in St. Louis to repair artery damage in his right shoulder that could cost him the rest of the season. Gee has a clot dissolved in his shoulder Monday and during the procedure artery damage was discovered.

Dr. Robert Thompson at Barnes-Jewish Hospital in St. Louis will perform the surgery.

Gee is expected to not resume throwing for eight weeks, which would effectively end his season.

The Mets will bring up left-handed reliever Josh Edgin to take Gee’s spot on the roster, which Miguel Batista expected to take his spot in the rotation.

At this time, the Mets have no plans to bring up prospects Matt Harvey or Zach Wheeler.

ON DECK: First half disappointments.

 

 

Jul 11

Gee Update …. More Surgery?

Dillon Gee was discharged from New York-Presbyterian Hospital today, but that doesn’t mean his problems are over.

In a statement, the Mets announced further surgery is possible to prevent a recurrence of clotting: “During the next several days, Dillon will consider additional treatment options, including possible surgery, to prevent a recurrence of clotting in the same location.”

With Gee on the DL, the Mets will call up left-handed reliever Josh Edgin to take his spot on the roster, with Miguel Batista replacing him in the rotation.