Jul 29

Three Mets’ Storylines: Collins Says Team Needs To “Lighten Up”

This time, Mets fans booed – and loudly. Once again the Mets were horrid with RISP, when Scott Oberg entered with two on and nobody out in the eighth and got out of the inning on three pitches.

And, then in the top of the night, old nemesis Carlos Gonzalez, who had been rumored in previous years to be going to the Mets, crushed a three-run homer to ice it for the Colorado Rockies, 6-1, Friday night before yet another disappointed Citi Field crowd.

MATZ: Tough outing. (AP)

MATZ: Tough outing. (AP)

Speaking of old thorns, Mark Reynolds homered again for his tenth career homer against the Mets and seventh at Citi Field.

What Mets manager Terry Collins, to his credit, did not do, was boo his team. Collins can get testy but this time massaged the ego of his frustrated team.

“We have a good team,” Collins told reporters. “We’re going through a rough time right. We’re not dead. We’re still in the hunt. We need to lighten it up and have some fun.”

Collins addressed his team after the game, telling them, “we have to stop worrying about some of the bad things and concentrate on some of the good things.’’

The bad things are the Mets were 0-for-8 with RISP Friday and 5-for-50 on the homestand. They are .144 with RISP since the All-Star break.

However, Collins didn’t reinforce that, which was a good thing. I’ve been on Collins a lot lately, and don’t back off that criticism, but in all fairness what he did Friday was the right thing to do.

MATZ KEPT IT CLOSE: Giving up ten hits and one walk in six innings is by no means good, but somehow Steven Matz limited the damage to just two runs.

That should be good enough to win most games, and that’s what Collins told him.

“I told him he kept us in the game,” Collins said. “And, he should be happy about that.”

ROSTER MOVES: Prior to the game the Mets put outfielder Juan Lagares (thumb) on the disabled list and replaced by Brandon Nimmo.

Collins said after the game there’s a possibility Jose Reyes could go on the disabled list.

 

Jul 29

Mets Lineup, July 29 Against Rockies

The Mets play the second game in their four-game series on Mike Piazza Weekend. After a crushing defeat Thursday, Steven Matz attempts to even things up.

Here’s tonight’s lineup for the Mets:

Curtis Granderson – RF: With Jose Reyes on the shelf indefinitely, Granderson goes back to the top of the order.

Travis d’Arnaud – C: This is an interesting move. d’Arnaud clearly isn’t a conventional No. 2 hitter, but then again the Mets don’t have a traditional lineup these days, either.

Yoenis Cespedes – LF: He hasn’t been well since early July. The more they play him the less they can backdate any move to the DL.

James Loney – 1B: Has actually been the Mets’ most consistent hitter. He represents one of GM Sandy Alderson’s best moves.

Neil Walker – 2B: With back-to-back three-hit games, he has his swing back. Kind of thought he’d hit third or fourth.

Wilmer Flores – 3B: Once again doing well with Reyes down.

Asdrubal Cabrera – SS: He’s most comfortable hitting second, so it’s somewhat of a surprise to see him this low.

Michael Conforto – CF: Manager Terry Collins won’t learn. Conforto needs to be left alone hitting third.

Matz – LHP: Was a pinch-runner yesterday. Has pitched decently with bone spur.

 

Jul 26

Alderson’s Trade Stance Raises Questions

Here’s hoping GM Sandy Alderson is blowing smoke when he says don’t expect the Mets to add a starting pitcher or substantial hitter at the trade deadline. Maybe he’s trying to bluff teams. Maybe he’s trying to screw with reporters. Maybe he’s trying to drive manager Terry Collins crazy.

ALDERSON: Smoke or fire? (AP)

ALDERSON: Smoke or fire? (AP)

Probably all good reasons to Alderson, but you always have to read between the lines with him.

“We’re simply not going to move players we think are going to have a significant role for us in the somewhat near future for the possibility of getting the kind of unique return that we got last year,” Alderson told reporters.

Unique? Does that mean Alderson thinks last year was a fluke?

It sure sounds that way. There was a lot of gloom-and-doom around the Mets last July, before Alderson traded for Yoenis Cespedes and brought up Michael Conforto from the minors. This July, the Mets are the defending National League champions in need of help, and the void they claim they must fill – the bullpen – isn’t what they really need.

With how things played out Tuesday, could Alderson change his mind?

The pen has been solid the past six weeks. But after watching them slog through Tuesday’s doubleheader split with the Cardinals, losing, 3-2 in the opener and winning the second game 3-1, you know they must add a hitter and with the health issues of their starters, they need another arm.

Why the pen?

“Realistically, the bullpen is the area where we can probably get someone who can make a difference at a relatively low cost in terms of prospects,” Alderson said.

Alderson is really saying the Mets don’t want to give up anything significant, which has always been his M.O. Hitters and starting pitchers cost more than relievers, and Alderson doesn’t want to part with their minor league depth. Teams want shortstop prospect Amed Rosario, which is understandable. However, of the Mets’ top ten prospects listed by MLB.com, five are shortstops.

Damn, I hate that. In order to get something of quality you have to give up something.

“Realistically, it’s unlikely we’ll end up with another starting pitcher,” Alderson said. “It’s unrealistic that we’ll end up with a significant position player. And, with respect to the bullpen, we’re very happy with our bullpen. But at the same time we’re looking to upgrade the bottom half of the bullpen so we have a little more depth.”

Hansel Robles, Addison Reed and Jeurys Familia have been superb – Familia has converted 52 consecutive save opportunities after locking down last night’s second game – but Alderson says the issue is depth. Frankly, for a team trying to get to the World Series, a reliever for the sixth inning is not what they need most.

Alderson fears the law firm of Robles, Reed and Familia, is being worn down, but doesn’t giving them the proper rest fall on pitching coach Dan Warthen and Collins?

Here’s a thought, perhaps if the starting pitchers worked longer and didn’t run up such high pitch counts that would save the bullpen. That’s what Bartolo Colon did in the second game when he gave up one run in seven innings.

However, knowing Noah Syndergaard is pitching with a bone spur – pain tolerance is what the manager said is the key – and considering two starts ago he left with arm fatigue, why would Collins let him throw 114 pitches?

That many pitches warrants a complete game, but Syndergaard gave the Mets only six innings. Collins said he doesn’t know why Syndergaard’s pitch counts have been high, but it’s simple really, despite his 100 mph., heater, he’s not putting away hitters.

Syndergaard isn’t pitch efficient. He throws too many pitches for the innings he provides. That must change, and it has to change for Steven Matz, who is also trying to grind through a bone spur.

The Mets are pushing the envelope with Syndergaard and Matz and they know it. Matt Harvey is gone for the year. They have no idea what they’ll get from Zack Wheeler, or when they’ll even see him. Their preseason expectations had Wheeler replacing Colon in the rotation in early July,

Colon, after three poor starts, for one night at least put to rest his 43-year-old arm hit the wall. Because Colon threw only 87 pitches, he’ll come back on three days rest to start Saturday against Colorado.

“He’s been as good, if not better than anybody,” Collins said of Colon and his rotation. “He’s a special guy and we’re very lucky to have him.”

Doesn’t this gamble tell you the need for another starter?

Surely, Collins has been thinking about who would pitch Saturday, especially with Sean Gilmartin, who is with Triple-A Las Vegas, going on the disabled list earlier in the day. Collins wouldn’t think of going to Syndergaard on short rest and isn’t enamored with the idea of using Seth Lugo or bringing up Gabriel Ynoa from Triple-A Las Vegas.

Collins got testy when pressed for his reasoning on using Colon with short rest, and finally finished with a curt, “if he gets his brains beat out in three days, it will obviously be a bad decision.”

You can forgive Collins for getting upset because he was probably thinking of how the Mets would score runs with Jose Reyes to be lost for several games with a Grade 1 intercostal strain in his left rib cage. Collins is being optimistic because those things usually take a long time, and Reyes has a history of lengthy DL stints with strained muscles.

It means they’ll go back to Wilmer Flores, who had four hits in the second game. It also means they better hope last night meant the return of Asdrubal Cabrera, who finally had a hit with a runner in scoring position.

There’s a lot going on with the Mets, but despite being only within 4.5 games of the Nationals, Alderson isn’t giving many signs of being optimistic.

Maybe it’s a smokescreen.

Jul 18

What’s The Plan For Flores?

Like many of you, I have pet peeves with manager Terry Collins. Today’s is his inability to follow through with his proclamations. Ranging from protecting his pitchers with innings limits, to his batting order, to resting injured players, to how he doles out playing time, what Collins says can’t be truly believed.

FLORES: What will they do with him. (AP)

FLORES: What will they do with him. (AP)

Such as Wilmer Flores’ playing time.

When Jose Reyes was signed, Collins said he would share time with Flores. At the time, I wrote Flores should be used as a super sub, not only giving Reyes a rest, but for Asdrubal Cabrera, Neil Walker and James Loney.

Since Reyes rejoined the Mets, July 5, Flores has just 17 at-bats in seven games. Flores had been playing, and was hot, since replacing David Wright. He was sizzling leading up to Reyes’ return.

On July 3, he went 6-for-6 with two homers against the Cubs. Three days later, he homered twice against the Marlins. He’s had only two hits since. He did not play Sunday and Collins hasn’t indicated when he’ll play.

When it comes to Collins, there are no concrete plans. There wasn’t for limiting Matt Harvey’s innings last season. There doesn’t appear to be one with the outfield since it was learned Michael Conforto is coming up from Triple-A Las Vegas.

And, there doesn’t seem to be one with Flores’ playing time.

Perhaps he could play tonight against lefthander Jon Lester in Chicago, but I wouldn’t be surprised if he didn’t. The next lefthander scheduled against the Mets is Adam Conley, Friday, in Miami.

Who knows what Collins’ plans are, or what GM Sandy Alderson dictates them to be.

Perhaps they are planning to deal Flores again. This time, I hope it wasn’t the circus it was last year.

Jul 10

Three Mets’ Storylines: Loss Defines First Half

If ever a game was a microcosm of the Mets’ disappointing first half, it was Sunday’s loss to the Nationals.

The Mets were six games behind the Nationals when they were gut-punched after being swept in a three-game series in Washington two weeks ago that left them six games behind.

MATZ: Lone bright spot. (AP)

MATZ: Lone bright spot. (AP)

But, manager  Terry Collins said the homestand leading into the break, four games each against the Cubs and Nationals, and three with Miami, had the potential to turn the momentum and give them a chance to enter the second half with a good feeling.

That looked possible after a stunning four-game sweep of the Cubs and winning two of three against Marlins. But, after losing three of four to the Nationals, including 3-2 today, they are again six back.

“We’re still in the race,” was how Collins described the disappointing end of the first half to reporters. “We were in this situation one year ago. Things looked bleak, but we ended up in the World Series.”

The three key storylines taken today’s game are the Nationals’ continued dominance of the Mets; New York’s continued inability to produce offensively; and, Steven Matz again pitching well after his elbow flare-up.

WASHINGTON’S DOMINANCE: The Mets are a disappointing 4-9 against the Nationals this year, scoring a composite 16 runs in those nine losses. That’s emblematic of a myriad of deficiencies, notably of their all-or-nothing offense.

Assuming the Mets get it together and see another World Series, they will pretty much have to run the table in their remaining six games with Washington.

Washington’s first-half dominance over the Mets is definitely Daniel Murphy-related. He hit a two-run homer Sunday and has seven homers and 21 RBI so far against the Mets. He hit three homers and drove in ten runs over the weekend.

THE OFFENSE: When asked what the Mets had to most improve on in the second half, Collins simply said: “situational hitting.”

Previously, Collins insisted on saying his team was built on power, but history is full of power-laden teams that don’t win. Then again, GM Sandy Alderson – a disciple of the new-wave numbers – constructed this team.

The Mets got two homers from Jose Reyes today – that’s not why they signed him – and are second in the National League (to Washington) with 120 homers. However, far more telling is their .213 average with RISP with 180 strikeouts. They have won only five games when they don’t homer; are 11-34 with they score three runs or less; and, have been shutout eight times.

Complicating matters are they don’t have David Wright for the rest of the season; have been without Lucas Duda since May 21 with no idea of when he’ll be back; and, are without Yoenis Cespedes indefinitely.

MATZ SETTLES DOWN: Since the issue about his bone spur, Matz, who doesn’t have a win since May 25, has given the Mets seven innings in back-to-back starts and before that worked into the sixth against the Cubs.

That’s encouraging news, especially after losing Matt Harvey for the season and Noah Syndergaard’s mysterious “arm fatigue.’’

I believe in babying pitchers’ arms when there is an injury. That’s what the Nationals did with Stephen Strasburg, and something the Mets do not believe.

With Matz, I am waiting for the other shoe to drop because it always does with the Mets.