Sep 25

Alderson: Swing And A Miss

Yesterday, I looked at GM Sandy Alderson’s best moves with the Mets. Today, I’ll examine some of his worst decisions, of which there have been more than a few.

Not every decision will work, but here are his swings-and-misses:

INACTIVITIY IN THE OFFSEASON AND TRADE DEADLINE: Several big names have come and gone without Alderson taking a whiff during his tenure. However, it must be remembered the decision not to spend big bucks came from the Wilpons. Quite simply, for the most part he was following instructions. Still, there have been several middle-tier free agents that might have helped such as Jason Marquis.

ALDERSON: Not everything went perfectly.

ALDERSON: Not everything went perfectly.

FAILURE TO BUILD BULLPEN: Alderson’s primary building objective since his arrival was to build a bullpen. It hasn’t worked out, although this year’s pen – if kept intact – has the potential to be good. They finally settled on a role for Jenrry Mejia and he’s developed into a quality closer.

Arguably, one of Alderson’s best pick-ups – and I should have mentioned this yesterday – is Carlos Torres. Jeurys Familia, Vic Black, Rafael Montero and Josh Edgin comprise a quality core with a lot of potential. Still, it took up to three years for Alderson to get the bullpen going in the right direction.

THE OUTFIELD:  Remember when Lucas Duda, Mike Baxter and Jordany Valdespin were in the outfield? Players have come and gone but Alderson has never put together a good outfield. At least, for the next few years he’ll have Juan Lagares and Curtis Granderson. But, there’s still a hole in left field.

CHRIS YOUNG: Paying $7.25 million for one year for a .200 hitter. Yes, that’s what he did. He was hoping to strike lightning in a bottle, but he could have taken that gamble for half that amount.

IKE DAVIS: Alderson tried the patience route far long with first baseman Ike Davis. Last season never should have happened.

JORDANY VALDESPIN: Alderson finally did the right thing, but Alderson should have cut ties with him last summer. You don’t let that kind of that distraction fester on a team trying to adapt a new culture.

NOT PUSHING THE ENVELOPE WITH THE INJURED: Matt Harvey and David Wright, to name two, were those who played while injured and subsequently missed the rest of the season. Particularly Wright has persisted and play through injuries.

 

Dec 03

What Non-Tendered Mets Could Be Worth Another Look

The New York Mets sent five players to the free-agent market when they non-tendered Jeremy Hefner, Justin Turner, Scott Atchison, Jordany Valdespin and Omar Quintanilla.

HEFNER: Is he worth another look?

HEFNER: Is he worth another look?

None of the decisions should be considered surprising, and to get where they want to be they would need to do get better than what they had.

The question is, what to do until then? Here’s my take on the five let go:

JEREMY HEFNER: Hefner was clearly a dollar move as he wouldn’t be available any way because he’s recovering from Tommy John surgery. Nonetheless, they could re-sign him at a lower rate and not have him on the 40-man roster.

Hefner proved to be a valuable spot-starter, but would not be considered any higher than a fifth starter.

Working against Hefner, is by the time he was cleared to return, the Mets’ rotation would have Matt Harvey back, plus the expected promotions of Rafael Montero, Noah Syndergaard and Jacob deGrom.

JUSTIN TURNER: Was a valuable role player off the bench, but not somebody who could play for any length of time without his weaknesses being exposed.

The Mets could groom Wilmer Flores to replace him, but Turner can play shortstop so it would be a limited move.

Flores, however, could master the shaving cream pie to the face shtick Turner popularized.

JORDANY VALDESPIN: No way.

SCOTT ATCHISON:  He gave the Mets 47.1 innings last season out of the pen. The Mets need to replace those innings and could do it for the same $700,000 Atchison made, but for a younger arm.

OMAR QUINTANILLA: He played in 95 games when Ruben Tejada went down, and was more than capable defensively, but hit only .222 with a .306 on-base percentage.

Those two numbers have the Mets believing he’s not a fulltime answer at shortstop.

The position remains a hole, and it looks as if they could go with Tejada again. Even so, they don’t have a back-up.

COMING UP: Why the Mets did not non-tender Ike Davis.