Feb 26

Jon Niese To Get MRI On Shoulder

Let’s face it, it wouldn’t be a normal New York Mets spring training without an injury – specifically to a pitcher.

Jonathon Niese is the latest and was sent to New York today for a MRI after complaining of pain in his left shoulder.

NIESE: Has MRI. (AP)

NIESE: Has MRI. (AP)

“I wanted to keep it quiet,’’ Niese told reporters in Port St. Lucie, ironically just two days after manager Terry Collins said he wants his players to disclose injuries. “It’s just a precautionary thing to make sure it’s not worse from last year. I just want peace of mind.’’

Specifically, Niese said his arm felt “dead,’’ which is a common occurrence during spring training and often stems from throwing too much too early.

Niese was in Port St. Lucie earlier than required to be, and there’s no telling how much he threw then, or during the off-season.

Niese, after laboring through two starts in freezing weather in Minnesota and Colorado last season – both games should have been rescheduled – later complained of stiffness in his back and trouble getting loose.

Eventually, Niese was placed on the disabled list, June 21, with a partial tear in his rotator cuff, and did not come back until Aug. 11.

Collins, speaking to reporters in Port St. Lucie, said the pain is in the triceps, which is a different part of the arm. The pain surfaced while Niese was throwing his second round of 20 pitches of batting practice Tuesday.

“Batting practice started and he felt fine,’’ Collins said. “And then he threw his second 20 pitches the other day. He just said at the end of it, ‘Geez, my arm’s just dead. Like, it’s dead.’ … It’s a precaution right now, but any time you’re sending someone for an MRI, obviously there’s going to be a concern until you get the reading back.

“He just said he’s got a little discomfort in there. So we’re going to go have it looked at.’’

Niese, 27, in the midst of a five-year, $25.5 million contract, has been scheduled to be the Opening Day starter, March 31, against Washington, at Citi Field.

ON DECK:  Sandy Alderson on shortstop situation

Feb 23

Terry Collins Announces Exhibition Starting Pitchers

New York Mets manager Terry Collins announced his rotation for the first five exhibition games Sunday morning.

Rafael Montero will get the ball for the exhibition opener this Friday against Washington at Tradition Field.

He will be followed by fifth-starter candidate John Lannan, March 1 against Miami; fifth-starter possibility Daisuke Matsuzaka, March 2 against St. Louis, at Jupiter; Noah Syndergaard, March 3 against Atlanta, at Orlando; Jonathon Niese, March 4 against Houston in Port St. Lucie.

Presumably, Zack Wheeler, who’ll throw batting practice today, Dillon Gee and Bartolo Colon will be next in line, but the order hasn’t been determined.

Relievers were not announced.

For the first game, the starters normally get two innings or roughly 30 pitches. The objective is to build them up to seven innings and 100 pitches.

Collins already said he is leaning towards Niese as his Opening Day starter against the Nationals.

It is unlikely Montero, who went 12-7 with a 2.78 ERA last year in 27 starts at Double-A Binghamton and Triple-A Las Vegas, will make the 25-man roster coming out of spring training.

ON DECK:  Could Matt Harvey Be A High Maintenance Super Nova?

 

Feb 16

Five Mets On The Hot Seat

We’re still a long way from Jonathon Niese’s first pitch of the 2014 season against Washington, but that doesn’t mean there aren’t already some New York Mets on the hot seat, broiling under the glare of expectations.

Every spring in every camp there are several players on a short-patience rope and the Mets are no exception. In my mind, there are five facing a make-or-break season, beginning with Niese:

GRANDERSON: Has pressure.

GRANDERSON: Has pressure.

Jonathon Niese: Will it ever happen for him? He was signed to a multi-year extension because he was young, left-handed and could throw hard. However, he’s never won more than 13 games in a season and has sustained a myriad of injuries, including shoulder problems last season. At 29, there’s still time, but could one of the young prospects prompt the Mets to shop him?

Ike Davis: No Mets “question list,’’ doesn’t have his name. It is last-chance time for the former hot prospect. After 32 homers in 2012, that’s the plateau the club is seeking. The Mets would take less, say 25, if his RBI production and on-base percentage were high and his strikeouts substantially cut. He either hits this year or he’s gone.

Ruben Tejada: The Mets toyed with signing Stephen Drew, but were sold on the potential of the younger and cheaper Tejada after his commitment at a Michigan fitness camp. The Mets are pointing to 2015 and Matt Harvey’s return to when they can realistically contend, and they won’t be able to do that with a hole at shortstop.

Curtis Granderson: Signed a four-year deal for big money in the hope of providing power in the outfield. I have two words: Jason Bay. Fans are smart enough to realize he won’t hit for the power he did at Yankee Stadium, but they won’t accept Bay-like numbers. Granderson represents the Mets’ promise  to improve and needs to live up to those expectations.

Chris Young: He’s probably gone after this season, but he’ll start the year with a bulls-eye on his back. With his recent numbers it is incomprehensible for him to get a $7.25 million contract. He must produce for his own peace of mind in shutting up the boos.

Aug 16

What’s Mets’ Thinking With Flores Injury?

There are times when the New York Mets are hard to figure out, and the latest regarding Wilmer Flores is one of them.

Flores sprained his right ankle running the bases Monday in Los Angeles and hasn’t played since. He is, however, in a walking boot and supposedly able to pinch-hit.

“It was important that he get an at-bat,’’ manager Terry Collins said about Flores staying in the game. “Because if he can’t play for a few days, at least if we know he can go up and hit, it’s going to help us.’’

Really? How is he going to help the Mets if he can’t run to first base? I can see not rushing him to the disabled list immediately, but if he can’t play for a few more days they can backdate him to Tuesday.

Why can’t they simply say “he won’t play until he’s ready?’’ Bottom line: If he’s in a protective boot there’s no reason to even think about playing him.

GREAT PLAY: We’ve seen some terrific defensive plays this year from the Mets’ outfield, but the one Thursday night when Eric Young scaled the wall to deflect what would have been a home run back into the outfield is one of the best.

Young has been a joy to watch, both offensively with his ability to make things happen, and defensively for his penchant for running balls down.

I recently read where the Mets won’t keep both Young and Juan Lagares next year, to which I say: Why not?

There’s nothing wrong with stacking two speedy playmakers at the top of the order. Both are part of that group I recently profiled of in-season additions that developed this team and brought excitement where there was once none.

Young is in center tonight as Lagares gets the night off and Mike Baxter is given a chance to play in left field.

Tonight’s line-up at San Diego:

Eric Young, CF: Has 15 steals in 49 games with the Mets.

Daniel Murphy, 2B: Is hitting .224 (13-for-58) with one walk in August.

Marlon Byrd, RF: Is getting warm again, hitting .417 (10-for-24) on the trip.

Ike Davis, 1B: Is hitting .284 with 30 walks since recalled from Triple-A Las Vegas.

Josh Satin, 3B: Is hitting .303 since joining the Mets, but has just one homer.

Mike Baxter, LF: Not hitting at all this season with a paltry .213 average with four RBI.

John Buck, C: Still waiting for his wife to deliver and him to go on leave and enable Travis d’Arnaud to make his Mets’ debut.

Omar Quintanilla, SS: Takes a 0-for-9 slide into tonight’s game.

Jonathon Niese, LHP: Since August 2012. Niese has given up more than four earned runs twice in 25 starts.

As always, your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to answer them. Follow me on Twitter @jdelcos

Jun 21

Mets’ Jon Niese Has Rotator Cuff Tear; Injury Might Have Roots In Cold Weather Games

The bad news regarding Jonathon Niese has gotten worse – almost as bad as it can get for the New York Mets.

Niese, who left Thursday night’s game in Atlanta in the fourth inning because of pain in his left shoulder, was diagnosed with a partially torn rotator cuff. The announcement came less than an hour after manager Terry Collins was quoted as saying the injury wasn’t severe.

Collins’ comments only reinforced the understanding that under no circumstances, should the word of a Mets’ manager be taken when it comes to discussing the severity of an injury, which might have had its roots from Niese pitching in back-to-back sub-30-degree games in Minnesota and Denver.

Niese struggled after those starts and later complained of back stiffness. He later missed a start with shoulder tendinitis. What isn’t known, was how much Niese’s mechanics were altered by the cold-weather originated stiffness and if that strain eventually caused the tear.

Surgery is not immediately recommended the Mets said about an hour ago, but with this type of injury it usually is how these things end.

As was suggested earlier today, Niese was placed on the disabled list.

Speaking to reporters in Philadelphia, Mets assistant GM John Ricco said: “Hopefully, it will start healing itself and he won’t need surgery. But we’ll know more after a couple of weeks of rest. According to the doctors it’s a small-enough tear that with rest … they’re hopeful it won’t need surgery. It’s not ‘full thickness’ or a significant tear at this point.’’

If there’s no progress in that time, if the Mets wanted to add a player to their 40-man roster they could place Niese on the 60-day disabled list.

Niese recently missed a start because of tendinitis in his shoulder. Ricco said this is a new injury that didn’t show on a MRI at the time. That doesn’t mean Niese didn’t exasperate the injury by throwing with the tendinitis.

Reliever Greg Burke replaces Niese on the 25-man roster and the Mets’ rotation logjam took care of itself.

In a snarky comment, manager Collins told reporters: “You guys got your wish. There’s only five of them left.’’

It is as stupid a comment as a manager can make. No doubt Collins is frustrated, not only with his team, but also the persistent questioning of who would be bounced from the rotation.

The questioning is understandable since the Mets wanted to push things off by going to a six-man rotation. Reporters have to ask that question.

Collins’ answer implies the media wanted somebody to get hurt in order to get the answer. That’s not only absurd, but totally irresponsible.

It also won’t win Collins any points with the press if he needs the benefit of doubt when his job is on the line.

As always, your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to answer them. Please follow me on Twitter @jdelcos