Aug 01

Mets Get Bruce From Reds; Raises Questions

Updated to include quotes from Sandy Alderson and Terry Collins.

You can still find Brandon Nimmo with the Mets. Nimmo had been traded to Cincinnati for Jay Bruce, but that changed when he reportedly failed his physical and had to be replaced by second base prospect Dilson Herrera. Minor league lefty prospect Max Wotell was also included in the trade.

BRUCE: Running to Mets. (AP)

  BRUCE: Running to Mets. (AP)

The Mets added Herrera after the Reds found something they didn’t like with Nimmo’s physical. Nimmo had a foot injury earlier this year.

Mets GM Sandy Alderson would not confirm it was Nimmo who had the medical issue, but that’s not hard to figure out since he was pulled and Herrera was added.

The 29-year-old Bruce is expected to offer the punch that has been severely lacking, hitting .265 with 25 homers and a league-leading 80 RBI, and perhaps most importantly, a .360 average with RISP. Bruce has been on the Mets’ radar for over a year when they offered Zack Wheeler last July before landing Yoenis Cespedes.

“We haven’t had time to talk about playing time will be broken down,” Alderson said. “He’ll provide a big presence in the middle of the lineup. … One player could have a significant impact. Somebody like Jay Bruce can be a catalyst.”

Q: What is Bruce’s contractual status?

A: Bruce is in the final months of a six-year, $51 million contract, which includes a $13 million option (or $1 million buyout) for 2017. Bruce is making $12.5 million this season. Alderson said the club option was essential.

“We would not have done the deal without the extra year of control,” Alderson said. “We would not have done the deal as a rental.”

Specifically, this gives the Mets a safety net should Cespedes opt out and leave after this season.

Q: Where will Bruce play?

A: With Cespedes insisting on playing left field, Bruce could go to right field with Curtis Granderson moving to center.

Q: How does the deal impact Cespedes and Michael Conforto?

A: If there is a time to put Cespedes (strained right quad) on the disabled list it is now (actually, it should have been three weeks ago). Having Bruce gives the Mets the flexibility of placing Cespedes on the disabled list now, which is preferable to risking an injury and losing him in September. What Bruce does is offer the Mets a safety net should Cespedes opt out after this season.

As for Conforto, he’ll stay up here if Cespedes goes on the DL. However, there’s a strong chance they’ll send him back to the minors and bring him up again in September unless there’s an injury before then.

Q: What about the long-term future with Granderson?

A: It’s all fluid now as Granderson has one more year on his contract and the Mets can choose not to bring back Bruce for 2017.

Q: Does it matter that even with Bruce the Mets don’t have a conventional outfield?

A: Not in the least, simply because the Mets don’t have a conventional outfield now. Bruce will report to the Mets tomorrow. Beginning Wednesday, the Mets will have five games in American League parks (two with the Yankees and three in Detroit), where they can buy some time with Cespedes.

Unbelievably, Collins said the Mets hope Cespedes might be able to play center field by the end of the week.

Q: What is the fallout with Herrera?

A: The sticking point in getting Lucroy from the Brewers was them not wanting to give up Herrera. This could enhance their chances of keeping Neil Walker, who can opt out if he wants after the season. Of course, that could mean giving him more money. Part of the reason why Alderson let Daniel Murphy walk was in part because of Herrera. Alderson said the Mets have some infield depth for next year with Wilmer Flores and Jose Reyes.

Q: Anything else?

A: Right at the deadline, the Mets reaquired Jon Niese from Pittsburgh for lefty reliever Antonio Bastardo. Niese will be used primarily out of the bullpen – “I didn’t forget the job he did last year [in relief],” Collins said – but could be slotted in if another starter needed a day of rest.

Jul 25

Suggesting A New Batting Order For Listless Mets’ Offense

Seventh? Can you believe it? Michael Conforto was in the starting lineup for Monday’s game – that was rained out – but hitting seventh in the order.

After a successful stint in the minors that culminated in two hits Sunday in Miami, that’s not where he should be in the order. Manager Terry Collins should leave Conforto in center, have him bat third and just leave him alone.

CONFORTO: Keep him third. (Getty)

CONFORTO: Keep him third. (Getty)

Conforto fizzled in April, got pull happy and saw his average drop from a season-high .365 on April 30 to a season-low .222 when he was sent down after four hitless games, June 21-24.

Conforto was told to concentrate on using the entire field and that’s been his mindset since coming back up.

“Just getting back to the kind of hitter that I feel like I am and use the whole field, take what the pitcher gives me,” Conforto told reporters in Miami about his hitting approach. “It’s really stuff we were working on up there. When you go down there, you get a chance to take a breath and really look at what’s going on and work on some things. It was a positive for me to go down there and work on some stuff.”

The Mets’ lineup has been dormant for much of the season, and part of the reason has been an inconsistent batting order.

Here’s what I suggest to offer stability:

Jose Reyes, 3B: He’s off to a good start since coming back and the only speed threat in the order.

Asdrubal Cabrera, 2B: He’s been terrible with RISP, so why not hit him in a place where there isn’t many runners in that position? Besides, Cabrera has been successful batting second.

Conforto, CF: He shouldn’t be here if he doesn’t play, and the best thing is to play him where he’s expected to end up. No more moving him around or pinch-hitting for him against right-handers.

Yoenis Cespedes, LF: The Mets aren’t going to budge on this – Cespedes will play left. But, he’s been the best power bat so hit him cleanup.

Curtis Granderson, RF: Batting him fifth would sandwich Cespedes against two left-handers.

James Loney, 1B: He’s been a terrific pick up and done it both in the field and at the plate. I’d also hit Wilmer Flores sixth when he plays, and once again, he should be in a rotation with the other infielders.

Travis d’Arnaud, C: Of course, this is predicated on him still being here. Should they get Jonathan Lucroy from Milwaukee, I’d bat him sixth behind Granderson and drop Loney down a notch.

Neil Walker, 2B: Slumps don’t get much deeper than the one Walker is currently riding. Pitchers could work around him to get to the pitcher. In the end, if Walker stays patient, this could help snap him out of a slump.

Pitcher’s spot: Ninth.


Jul 25

Mets Talking Trade With Brewers

Apparently, the Mets will be buyers at the trade deadline, but will they shop at Nordstrom’s or K-Mart? The rap on Mets GM Sandy Alderson is he wants to pay K-Mart prices for Nordstrom quality.

LUCROY: What will he cost? (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)

LUCROY: What will he cost? (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)

The Mets reportedly interested in Milwaukee catcher Jonathan Lucroy and relievers Jeremy Jeffress and lefty Will Smith. Lucroy was on the Mets’ radar over a month ago, but the relievers are new on their list.

Any one of them could help the Mets; all three could put them over the top. Perhaps.

The Brewers already rejected catcher Travis d’Arnaud for Lucroy straight up, so the Mets would have to sweeten the pot with a high-level prospect. No, Wilmer Flores doesn’t count and considering his setbacks, neither would Zack Wheeler.

It’s that mystery prospect that’s intriguing.

The Mets say they don’t want to part with shortstop Amed Rosario, but what about Gavin Cecchini, also a shortstop? Luis Carpio is also a shortstop prospect. They certainly can’t keep all three.

First baseman Dominic Smith and outfielder Brandon Nimmo could be on the table.

But, whose table?

The Mets said adding to their bullpen is a priority, but Hansel Robles, Addison Reed and Jeurys Familia have been a solid 7-8-9 trio over the past six weeks.

A name to keep your eye on is former Nationals reliever Drew Storen, who was designated for assignment by Toronto, where he was having a miserable season, going 1-3 with a 6.21 ERA in 38 appearances. In 33.1 innings he had 32 strikeouts, which was excellent, but gave up 23 runs on 43 hits and 10 walks (1.590 WHIP), which clearly is not.

Sep 26

Mets Wrap: David Wright Beaned; Says He’s OK

There are few sounds in sports more distinctive, or sickening, than that of pitched ball hitting a player in the helmet, which the New York Mets heard Thursday night when Johnny Hellweg beaned David Wright in the third inning.

Nothing ever good comes with that sound.

WRIGHT: Beaned. (Getty)

WRIGHT: Beaned. (Getty)

Wright went down in a heap, reminiscent of when San Francisco’s Matt Cain hit him in 2009 to force him to the disabled list. Brewers catcher Jonathan Lucroy immediately came to Wright’s aid in a wonderful display of sportsmanship.

“He passed a concussion test,’’ manager Terry Collins said. “We’ll do some things (Saturday) and see if he has a headache. He said, `I’ll be OK.’ But I said, great, but you’re still out of the game.’’

Cain hit Wright with a 94-mph. fastball; Hellweg hit him with an 86-mph. fastball. Both sounds were unnerving.

Collins and trainer Ray Ramirez helped Wright off the field, and he was immediately examined and passed a concussion test. Wright’s status for the remaining three games of the season is unknown.

“I’m feeling fine,’’ Wright said. “It was for precautionary reasons for not staying in the game.’’

Wright said there were differences between this and the Cain beaning.

“It’s scary,’’ Wright said. “I have been through this before. It was a lot less painful this time. … You go through your checkpoints. My ears weren’t ringing. I knew the score. There was no memory loss.’’

Wright will undergo more tests Friday, but even if his head is clear, there’s another obstacle as when he fell backwards and jammed his right thumb.

In many ways, tonight was a microcosm of the Mets’ season with an injury, and a decent pitching performance from Dillon Gee wasted from a lack of run support.

The Mets had their chances with 15 base runners in the 4-2 loss. Overall, the Mets were 0-for-14 with runners in scoring position, and left 11 runners.

Gee entered seeking his 13th victory, but wound up losing his 11th as he gave up four runs on seven hits in six innings. He finished one inning shy of 200 for the season. Collins shot down the idea of giving Gee an inning Sunday – which would be his throw day – to reach that milestone.

“(Gee) has a lot to be proud of,’’ Collins said. “From where he was last year, to where he finished this season, he has every reason to be proud.’’

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