Oct 30

Five Reasons Why The Mets Can Still Win

The Mets are down two games in the World Series, but I am here to give you five reasons why they can come back and win this thing. Never mind the odds, the beautiful thing about sports is anything can happen, including a parade down the Canyon of Heroes.

Here’s how it can happen:

COLLINS: The right man in the dugout for Mets. (Getty)

COLLINS: The right man in the dugout for Mets. (Getty)

TERRY COLLINS: Let’s start with the basics. You need to win four games to win a World Series and the Royals have only won two. The Royals haven’t won anything yet and they know it.

Manager Terry Collins will make that his first point when he talks to his players today. He must stress the Mets need to win just one game. They win Friday and go to work Saturday. One game at a time is a cliché, but a cliché becomes a cliché because it is true.

As long as the Mets have the mindset all they need to do is concentrate on that day’s game they will be fine. Sure, they are in a hole. If they think it’s a big hole they are in trouble. If they look at it as a matter of one game they can win. (See: 1986 Mets; 2004 Red Sox).

For the most part, Collins pushed the right buttons this year. He knows his team, knows its temperament and knows how to pull them out of funks. He lost a couple of gambles in the first two games, but made them for the right reasons.

Collins made a good decision Thursday when he made the workout optional. Collins knew his team was fatigued and the questions they would be asked. He knew his team needed a breather.

That’s a manager having the pulse of his team.

THIS CAN’T LAST: The Mets played maybe their worst game in a month in Game 2. We have seen them bounce back from bad games numerous times this year to play well.

These Mets have put bad moments behind them and responded with wins. That’s a quality you don’t forget and I expect them to do the same starting Friday.

Teams go into slumps, and the Mets are no different. They got here because they played well and I believe they will snap out of it.

I’m counting on it.

THEY STILL HAVE THAT PITCHING: The main storyline going in was the Mets’ rotation. Just because they didn’t win with Matt Harvey and Jacob deGrom in Games 1 and 2 doesn’t mean they went away for good. That advantage still exists.

Remember, both pitched with a lead, but were victimized by a bad inning. They could each get another start, with Harvey getting Game 5 at home and deGrom Game 6 on the road.

It’s hard to remember them pitching poorly in back-to-back starts. In case you’re wondering about fatigue, neither pitched deep into their games and that will work in their favor.

Noah Syndergaard goes Friday and has done well at home.

Oh, and by the way, I don’t believe Jeurys Familia will be scarred by Game 1. You don’t save that many games by letting things bother you.

SPEAKING OF HOME: The 2-3-2 format works in the Mets’ favor. Three straight games at Citi Field with that rocking crowd can turn the tone of the Series.

The Mets won 60 percent of their Citi Field games this season and definitely have a home field advantage. I would bet on the Mets returning to Kansas City.

A player who thrives at Citi Field is Lucas Duda, who hit 19 of his 27 home runs in the direction of the Pepsi Porch.

A HOT BAT WILL SURFACE: Whether it be David Wright, Yoenis Cespedes, Duda, or Curtis Granderson, I expect one or more to snap out of it.

The Royals seemed to have solved Daniel Murphy, but he’s getting hits. If Murphy is to be a player of the ages we thought a week ago, he’ll need another spurt.

The Mets have struck out a lot, but this is something that can be addressed with patience. They’ve snapped out of it before and have the ability to do it again. A little hit-and-run, a little stealing has a way of jumpstarting an offense.

Remember, they didn’t win 90 games by accident. Strat-O-Matic believes that. The game we played as kids – before such things as Fantasy Leagues – projected the Royals to win the first two games.

And, for the Mets winning the next four.

 

 

Oct 28

Mets Lose Epic Game 1 In 14 Innings

It wasn’t the greatest World Series game of all time, but it will be pretty close. The Mets lost an epic Game 1 to Kansas City, 5-4 in 14 innings, that will be remembered for years to come, and one that undoubtedly kept Terry Collins and his team awake for most of the night.

The Mets, who have been a study in resiliency this season and found a way to win during these playoffs, could only lament what went wrong. The game began with Yoenis Cespedes misplaying Alcides Escobar‘s drive into the left-center gap on the first pitch of the game from Matt Harvey into an inside-the-park home run.

FAMILIA: Costly blown save dooms Mets. (Getty)

FAMILIA: Costly blown save dooms Mets. (Getty)

It ended over five hours later with Eric Hosmer‘s game-winning sacrifice fly. A few hours before that, Hosmer muffed Wilmer Flores‘ hot-shot grounder that briefly gave the Mets a 4-3 lead in the eighth inning. Enter automatic Jeurys Familia and the Mets would tuck themselves in with an early one-game advantage.

But, it wasn’t to be.

Alex Gordon homered in the ninth to force extra innings, and the battle of the bullpens the Mets desperately wanted to avoid, became an unlikely duel between Bartolo Colon and former Met Chris Young.

Who could have guessed it at the start of the season?

But, this game wasn’t about the Royals getting to Colon in the 14th as much as it was about the Mets squandering numerous chances to win. How numerous? Well, their hitters struck out 15 times, stranded 11 runners and went 1-for-10 with runners in scoring position.

David Wright‘s throwing error opened the door to the Kansas City 14th inning, but only left the impression had he made the play it was only delaying the inevitable. Conventional thinking was the game was over with Familia’s blown save.

All of a sudden, the Mets’ sense of invincibility is over, that is, until Jacob deGrom is able to bring it back in Game 2.

Oct 18

Mets Might Not Have Familia In Game 2

Eventually, Mets manager Terry Collins must go to regular-season relievers Tyler Clippard and Addison Reed after using closer Jeurys Familia the last two games for more than one inning.

That could come tonight as Collins said he might not have Familia available in Game 2.

“I don’t know, maybe Jeurys [Sunday] will need a night off and we can close with Clip and set up with Addison,’’ Collins said. “We’ve got options down there. …I’m hoping Noah goes deep in the game. That’s the perfect scenario. Sometimes it happens and sometimes it doesn’t, but when it does, I think you’ve got to go to it.’’

The Mets used Noah Syndergaard in middle relief in Game 5 and Bartolo prior to that in the NLCS. Clearly, Collins felt more confortable to using starters in middle relief.

“I’m not trying to [deliberately not use my middle relievers],’’ Collins said. “It’s just we’ve got pretty good starting pitching, and if they can get deep into the game [and] you’ve got what I think is one of the best closers in baseball [then] I like our chances.’’

Something to watch for tonight.

Please follow me on Twitter and Facebook.

Oct 09

Mets NLDS Roster Set

The Mets just released their NLDS roster, and there are no surprises. It includes Steven Matz, which means he passed the test and will be the Game 4 starter. Kirk Nieuwenhuis is named to replace Juan Uribe. The Mets can place Uribe on the NLCS roster.

POSITION PLAYERS STARTERS

Travis d’Arnaud

Lucas Duda

Daniel Murphy

Ruben Tejada

David Wright

Michael Cuddyer

Curtis Granderson

Yoenis Cespedes

BENCH PLAYERS

Kelly Johnson

Kevin Plawecki

Wilmer Flores

Michael Conforto

Juan Lagares

Kirk Nieuwenhuis

ROTATION

Jacob deGrom

Noah Syndergaard

Matt Harvey

Steven Matz

BULLPEN

Jeurys Familia

Tyler Clippard

Addison Reed

Bartolo Colon

Jon Niese

Hansel Robles

Erik Goeddel

 

Aug 11

Five Questions If The Mets Are To Contend

The Mets answered one of the most important questions if they are to contend, which is whether they would add to their roster. The additions of Yoenis Cespedes, Tyler Clippard, Juan Uribe and Kelly Johnson energized this team. They created further sparks when Travis d’Arnaud was activated from the disabled list and now the pending return of David Wright.

However, there are more questions to be answered, with these being the most pertinent:

QUESTION: How will they handle the pressure?

ANSWER: There’s a minimum of postseason experience on this roster, and Wright still hasn’t returned. Uribe and Johnson have been there before, but not Lucas Duda, Daniel Murphy, Wilmer Flores or Juan Lagares. Eventually they will be faced with a critical situation, one they have yet to encounter.

QUESTION: How will the young arms hold up?

ANSWER: Matt Harvey, Noah Syndergaard and Jacob deGrom have been stellar, but as the season progresses they will surpass career highs in innings pitched. None of them have pitched meaningful games in September.

QUESTION: How good will Wright be when he returns?

ANSWER: Nobody can say, but if he’s his former self considerable pressure will be alleviated down the lineup. The Mets will need another RBI bat in the middle of their order down the stretch.

QUESTION: Will the bullpen hold up?

ANSWER: This is all new for Jeurys Familia, but Clippard has playoff experience. It will be interesting to see if manager Terry Collins has a shorts leash when it comes to his bullpen.

QUESTION: Will they stay healthy?

ANSWER: We’re waiting on Wright, but Duda missed Tuesday’s game. Lagares has had a sore are all year and runners are taking liberties off him on the bases. Fortunately, Harvey has so far responded coming off Tommy John surgery.