Jun 30

Projecting Mets’ Bullpen When Mejia Returns

Although Bobby Parnell has pitched well for the Mets since coming off the disabled list, I’m figuring Jenrry Mejia will assume to the set-up role to Jeurys Familia when he’s activated from his suspension next week.

I thought the Mets would sever ties with Mejia after he was nailed for PEDs, but the erratic performance of their bullpen made that implausible. However, should the Mets qualify for the playoffs, Mejia would not be eligible.

Familia should remain in the closer role, followed by Mejia and Parnell. Should the Mets stay with seven relievers, I’m thinking right-handers Carlos Torres and Logan Verrett would stay in the bullpen along with left-handers Alex Torres and Sean Gilmartin with Hansel Robles going down.

Including Dillon Gee, the Mets have used 12 relievers this season.

Apr 23

Don’t Think We’ll See Mejia Again

Resiliency is a characteristic of a championship caliber team, and so far it defines the 2015 New York Mets.

To date, they have lost for the season Zack Wheeler and Josh Edgin to elbow injuries, and Jenrry Mejia to a drug suspension. They are also without David Wright, Travis d’Arnaud, Vic Black and Bobby Parnell.

A little more than two weeks in and the Mets are on their second catcher and third closer.

There have been a lot of key figures to the Mets’ climb to the top of the NL East, but arguably one of their most important has been Jeurys Familia, who took the closer role from Mejia and by extension, Parnell.

The Mets’ bullpen is minus Parnell, Black, Edgin and Mejia, which are four of the seven they had counted on. Imagine where they might be today without Familia’s seven saves.

When Parnell does return, manager Terry Collins said he won’t immediately return to closing duties, and chances are Mejia will never wear a Mets’ uniform again.

If Mejia’s 80-game suspension isn’t enough to act as a deterrent for those players that choose to find an illegal edge, then perhaps this might be – not only is Mejia suspended, but his career could be over. At least, his one in Flushing.

Apr 15

No Fooling Around; Put Wright On DL

They wouldn’t be the New York Mets if they didn’t have adversity. First they opened the season without three key relievers. Then they lose Zack Wheeler to injury and Jenrry Mejia to stupidity.

WRIGHT: Facing DL with hamstring pull. (AP)

WRIGHT: Facing DL with hamstring pull. (AP)

Now they face losing David Wright indefinitely with a pulled right hamstring. Wright is undergoing a MRI this morning and Eric Campbell has already been flown in. Wright will go to the disabled list, but with this type of injury, for how long is anybody’s guess.

They’ve played fast and loose with injuries – including to Wright before – but they can’t afford to screw around this time. Wright needs to go on the DL, and even admitted as such.

Several times Wright – by his own admission – foolishly tried to play through an injury. He tried to test it last night, but left the field quickly.

“`I knew it was something bad,” said manager Terry Collins, who added normally would wrap it up and play the next day.

Not this time and Wright knows it.

In a concession to age and experience, not to mention leadership, Wright said: “The last thing I want to do is go out there and do what I did a couple of years ago, where I feel something, you don’t say anything, you try to play through it and you end up missing a significant amount of time rather than something that’s relatively shorter.”

Wright’s injury exposed the Mets’ thin bench as back-up catcher Anthony Recker played first base.

The Mets also considered using Lucas Duda, but that would have left Recker playing first. They could have also used Daniel Murphy. They had other options, but none of them good.

It was a close game and they were lucky nothing happened. They are obviously exposed and it came close to biting them last night.

GM Sandy Alderson might not like it, but he must put together a conventional roster.



Apr 12

Wright’s Criticism Of Mejia Shows Why He’s Captain

Like anybody with a clue, Mets captain David Wright was upset, angry, disappointed – choose whatever word you want – in reliever Jenrry Mejia, who was suspended for 80 games for using Stanozol. I’d like to add stupid. These guys know the banned substances and the penalty. If there’s an “Idiot of the Year Award,” Mejia is deserving.

MEJIA: Idiot. (AP)

MEJIA: Idiot. (AP)

Unlike many players who stick their head in the sand when it comes to commenting on teammates who get busted, Wright pulled no punches. None.

“It’s obviously disappointing. Not only do you cost yourself 80 games and don’t get paid, but you’re hurting everybody in here,” Wright told reporters in Atlanta. “You’re letting down your teammates and I think that probably means just as much, if not more, than hurting yourself.

“As much as it hurts, as much as we love Jenrry as a teammate, you make mistakes, you need to be punished. Once Jenrry serves his punishment and comes back, we’ll welcome him and do whatever we can to make him feel like he’s part of this team. For right now, he messed up and he needs to be punished.”

How many Yankees spoke out against Alex Rodriguez? Certainly not Derek Jeter. I remember asking Jeter once about players who tested positive for PEDs, and his spineless answer was, “I don’t use them so it’s none of my business.”

What crap because the integrity of your sport should be your business.

When it came to taking a stand, Jeter was usually mute. Small wonder he has a “players only” website.

However, Wright is stand-up, even in speaking against one of his teammates. The Yankees weren’t when it came to Rodriguez and Roger Clemens; the Giants weren’t when it came to Barry Bonds; the Cubs weren’t when it came to Sammy Sosa.

Granted, Mejia isn’t as high profile as those others, but he’s an important Met.

When it comes to speaking out against PEDs, most players look the other way and that’s upsetting. It is also counterproductive when it comes to eliminating them.

But, it helps when the voice comes from a player such as Wright.


Apr 07

Mets’ Mejia Goes On DL; Bullpen In Flux

Who didn’t see this one coming for the Mets?

When Jenrry Mejia ran from the bullpen to the dugout – without stopping at the mound – at the start of the ninth inning Monday, there was no way that could have been good news.

MEJIA: Goes on DL. (AP)

MEJIA: Goes on DL. (AP)

It wasn’t, as a MRI and X-rays showed inflammation at the back of his right elbow, which landed him on the disabled list today (back-dated to Sunday). Replacing Mejia on the roster will be reliever Erik Goeddel, which keeps the pen at eight.

The Mets’ bullpen is in a state of flux, with Jeurys Familia assuming the closer role and Carlos Torres taking over as the eighth-inning set-up reliever. Game situations could dictate otherwise, but prospect Rafael Montero could get the seventh inning.

Montero, who failed to make the team as a starter, will get more work as the seventh-inning reliever than in long relief. That’s a positive decision by manager Terry Collins. Also positive is to go with Familia as the closer than use a closer-by-committee tactic. That rarely works and all too often leaves the relievers confused about their roles.

It has been a miserable spring for the Mets’ bullpen with Bobby Parnell, Josh Edgin, Vic Black and now Mejia on the disabled list. All but Black have had Tommy John surgery.

The Mets expect Parnell back by the end of the month, but there’s no timetable for Black.