Mar 04

Mejia Cries Foul; He’s Clueless

When you don’t have any cards your hand, you might as well bluff. That appears to be the strategy of Mets reliever Jenrry Mejia, who became the first MLB player to be permanently suspended after he failed three drug tests.

MEJIA: He's reaching. (AP)

MEJIA: He’s reaching. (AP)

Mejia told The New York Times that MLB is out to get him, that he is a victim of a witch hunt. Huh? Seriously?

After tangling with the likes of Alex Rodriguez and Ryan Braun – two MVPs that are big names – why would MLB go outside the lines to nail Mejia? In the grand scheme of things, who is Jenrry Mejia?

Mejia told the Times he was only guilty of the first offense, but the second test wasn’t accurate and that he was pressured by MLB for information on his drug connections. I have to ask, if what Mejia said was true, why didn’t he cry foul at the time? Quite simply, you don’t complain about the second test shortly after failing a third.

I’m always skeptical of stories involving Spanish-speaking players because things get muffled and lost through an interpreter. I mention this because Mejia told the paper, “I wouldn’t change a thing.”

Seriously? Nothing? You failed three drug tests and wouldn’t change anything?

If nothing else, he might try a different drug as he was caught twice for stanozolol and twice for boldenone.

Sure, MLB resorted to dirty tricks with Rodriguez, so you can’t say it is above doing such things. But, if that’s the case, would you do it against Mejia? Hardly. Like I said, he has nothing.

 

Feb 13

I Don’t Care If Mejia Ever Pitches Again

Excuse me, but I really don’t care if Jenrry Mejia ever throws another pitch for the New York Mets or any other team for that matter.

Somebody asked me today if I thought Mejia would be reinstated if he applies in another year. I thought about it for a second and that was my answer. Come to think of it, I didn’t even need a second.

Mejia is 26 and blessed with an arm that can throw a baseball well over 90 mph. He was playing every kid’s dream, yet it wasn’t enough.

So, he cheated. He was caught and then he cheated again. Then cheated for a third time.

He was to get $1 million this year, which is enough to live on for the rest of your life, if invested properly. Not lavishly, but you can more than survive on it.

Yet, none of that mattered to he had to cheat. He says he’ll appeal, but I don’t care. How can it be an accident if he’s caught using the same drug?

So, if somehow Mejia does win an appeal, I hope the Mets are smart enough to walk away. Personally, I don’t care if he every pitches again.

 

Nov 24

Mets Should Consider Bringing Back Mejia

After testing positive twice for PEDs, conventional reaction was the Mets would cut ties with reliever Jenrry Mejia. I was in that camp at first, but admit to softening my position based on economics and positional need.

MEJIA: Why not? (AP)

MEJIA: Why not? (AP)

Mejia was to make $2.595 million last year before the suspension and will make a prorated portion of that when his suspension ends in late July. In the grand scheme of things that’s not considered a lot for a set-up reliever, which is what the Mets will need if they don’t keep Tyler Clippard.

Mejia was the Mets closer in 2014 and saved 28 games. He was to be a set-up man for Jeurys Familia before the second suspension came down. If the Mets keep him he’ll slot in behind Addison Reed.

The Mets also will have to make decisions on relievers Carlos Torres and Josh Edgin. I think they’ll keep Torres because of his versatility and Edgin because he’s left handed.

With the money not appearing to be a problem and there certainly is a need for bullpen help. It’s worth a gamble.

 

 

 

Aug 28

High Flying Mets Due For Letdown Loss

Even after blowing another Matt Harvey start Friday night, a lot of things are breaking for the Mets these days and it is adding up to a wonderful summer. If it keeps going like this, it could be a great October.

For example:

HARVEY: Another no-decision. (Getty)

HARVEY: Another no-decision. (Getty)

* For most of his tenure as general manager, Sandy Alderson sat on his hands at the trade deadline, but this year brought in Yoenis Cespedes, Kelly Johnson, Juan Uribe and Tyler Clippard.

Perhaps the most defining, at least in regard to the tweaking of the Mets, was when the Wilmer Flores-for-Carlos Gomez trade fell through and Alderson was able to get Cespedes.

In May and June, and much of July, the Mets hungered for runs. But they’ve been mashing lately, and despite falling behind by three runs and down to their last out, the Mets fought back and the game ended with the winning run on base. Still, four days after hitting a club record eight homers in Philly, they were able to do little with the 12 walks the Red Sox gave them. That can’t happen if they make the playoffs.

* Speaking of Clippard, he fell into the Mets’ hands after blockhead Jenrry Mejia‘s second drug suspension. The Mets have bullpen problems, but not having an eighth-inning set-up reliever could be devastating. Now, the problem is filling in the seventh and this is where not having Mejia hurts.

On Friday they were forced to go with Carlos Torres the day after he pitched multiple innings against the Phillies. Not wanting to extend Harvey and not comfortable with his bullpen options, the Mets had to stay with Torres. This will be an issue in the playoffs.

* After not having David Wright for nearly five months, he homered in his first at-bat, but more importantly has been able to catch up to the speed of the game defensively.

* After Harvey was skipped and given 11 days of rest, there was some wonder as how he would do Friday night against Boston, but six scoreless innings with eight strikeouts answered that question. Of course, in watching the Mets blow the game, the nagging question about monitoring innings resurfaced. If he stayed in for another inning could extra innings have been avoided?

Perhaps, but Collins made a point to emphasize that in the playoffs he would have stayed with Harvey.

So many good things have happened for the Mets lately, including losing on the same day Washington lost. The NL East isn’t a given because we’ve seen leads slip away before, but before that harrowing thought takes seed, first we must look at Friday night as a simple speed bump.

After all, Jacob deGrom is pitching Saturday.

 

Aug 15

Mets Bullpen Is Achilles Heel

There have been some really great closers – Mariano Rivera and Dennis Eckersley, to name two – but what complemented them was the depth of their bullpens. Both the Yankees and Athletics were championship deep.

The Mets have faith in Jeurys Familia as their closer and Tyler Clippard in a set-up role. However, as evidenced by Bobby Parnell Friday night and future ex-Met Jenrry Mejia, depth is a problem.

PARNELL: Reliability a concern. (AP)

PARNELL: Reliability a concern. (AP)

For the most part, I’ve liked what Hansel Robles has done. At one time Carlos Torres was considered reliable. Not anymore. And, Sean Gilmartin and Eric O’Flaherty aren’t quite a comforting cup of hot cocoa on a winter’s night.

Familia has had implosion moments and it must be remembered this is the first time he will pitch under playoff-type pressure.

The bullpen has an Achilles Heel quality about it, so if GM Sandy Alderson has a chance to snag somebody off the waiver-wire scrap heap he would be wise to do so. Waiting for Jerry Blevins to return isn’t a sound strategy.

The Mets have a nice lead, but one capable of evaporating with a bad week by the bullpen. You might recall September of 2007.

The bullpen is a significant question moving forward. The Mets would be wise to act now rather than lament later.