Jul 26

Mets Have To Believe Cespedes’ Days Are Over

Sure, the Mets caught a bad break in losing Yoenis Cespedes for the rest of this season and probably up to August of next year. However, the one thing the Mets must resist is the notation to think ”he’ll come back to superstar form in 2020.”

CESPEDES: His days with Mets are over. (AP)

CESPEDES: His days with Mets are over. (AP)

They have to avoid that line of thought because, after all, these are the Mets we’re talking about, so everything breaking right usually doesn’t happen. The best position for the Mets is to learn from their David Wright experience and just move on.

They have to believe they got the best of Cespedes, but with that means they have to accept the worse. They have to believe Cespedes is gone forever, and everything they might get from him in the future is a bonus.

But, they can’t believe they never collect on that bonus.

Assistant general manager John Ricco said the Mets won’t alter their short-term plans to accommodate losing Cespedes, and they shouldn’t change their long-term plans, either.

”Certainly, when you don’t have one of your best players on the field, you have to look at your team differently,” Ricco said, when asked if Cespedes’ surgery changes the Mets’ long-term strategy. ”At this point, we just found this information out in the last day or so. I think it’s a little bit too quick to speculate as to how we’re going to change our plan moving forward.”

He’s right on that. Trading somebody like Jacob deGrom for a power bat in the outfield isn’t the prudent move now, because where the Mets are situated today, losing a solid arm in exchange for a handful of home runs won’t make them any better. And certainly, it won’t elevate them to contender status.

Even with a healthy and productive Cespedes, the Mets aren’t a contender. The Mets shouldn’t concentrate on acquiring a Cespedes-type bat until they do reach contending status.

And, it isn’t imminent.

Currently, the Mets’ outfield consists of Michael Conforto, Brandon Nimmo and Jose Bautista. When he returns, throw Jay Bruce into that mix. This isn’t to say the Mets don’t need a healthy and productive Cespedes, but they can’t count on that now.

Or ever again.

Jun 13

Mets Can’t Apologize Enough To DeGrom

I suppose things could get worse for the New York Mets, but that would really be frightening, now wouldn’t it? But, it is pretty bad when the players start apologizing to the starting pitcher, as Todd Frazier did to Jacob deGrom this afternoon.

The Mets lost for the tenth time in 11 games, 2-0 to Atlanta, and are now 2-8 in deGrom’s last ten starts despite him having a 0.87 ERA in that span.

DE GROM: Wasting his starts. (AP)

DE GROM: Wasting his starts. (AP)

“I told [deGrom] after the game: ‘Dude, I am sorry,’ ” Todd Frazier said. “I don’t know what’s going on. I don’t know why we’re not producing for him.”

In those 11 games, the Mets have scored two or fewer times nine times. Today, as deGrom cruised through the Braves, so did Atlanta pitcher Mike Soroka, who didn’t give up a hit until the seventh inning. The Mets’ second hit came in the ninth, Brandon Nimmo’s double with two outs in the ninth.

Then, with runners on second and third, Jay Bruce popped out swinging on the first pitch.

“We talk about trying too hard,” Frazier said. “Maybe we try too hard when he’s pitching, but a guy throws like that, he works fast, he was just dominant. Of course, he is going to give up one run and everybody is human so, for us not to put up any runs for him again, I told him, ‘I’m sorry.’ I didn’t know what else to tell him.”

DeGrom, as he usually does, said all the right things and wouldn’t point the finger at his offense.

“Nobody is happy that we’re losing,” deGrom said. “You have got to score runs to win and we haven’t been doing that, so nobody is happy with what’s going on.”

DeGrom threw only 86 pitches, and although he said he could have pitched longer, didn’t second-guess manager Mickey Callaway’s decision to pull him.

“I think it was just being smart and not trying to do too much,’’ said deGrom.

Meanwhile, the offense isn’t doing anything.

“We’ve wasted his starts,”  Bruce said.

May 09

Mets Bat Out Of Order; Lose Again

If what happened to the Mets today in Cincinnati isn’t hitting rock bottom, well, it should be. It doesn’t get much worse than a major league team batting order, which is what occurred in the first inning of today’s 2-1 loss in ten innings to the Reds.

The lineup card coach given the umpires prior to the game by coach Ruben Amaro Jr., has Asdrubal Cabrera second and Wilmer Flores third, which was different than the one publicly. That one had Flores second and Cabrera third, which is how they appeared at the plate when Cabrera blooped a two-out double to left with Jay Bruce coming up.

After the double, Reds interim manager Jim Riggleman, informed the umpires of the discrepancy and Bruce was called out.

This should be double-checked by the bench coach, Gary Disarcina, but Callaway wouldn’t throw his coach under the bus.

“I’m responsible for that,’’ Callaway said. “It probably cost us the game.’’

Maybe it did, maybe it didn’t, but stuff like this shouldn’t happen.

However, to Callaway’s credit, he got in front of it and accepted full responsibility. Rather than make excuses or blame somebody else, Callaway held himself accountable.

I’m sure nobody is happy with what’s going on with the Mets these days, but how Callaway took the blame is something that shouldn’t get lost on his team.

Wheeler Clicks With Mesoraco: Zack Wheeler and newly-acquired catcher Devin Mesoraco are off to a good start in their working relationship. With Mesoraco, who was acquired Monday for Matt Harvey, behind the plate today, Wheeler was sharp in a loss to Cincinnati.

Wheeler retired 12 straight Reds from the second through fifth innings but unraveled in the sixth. Even so, after giving up an RBI single to Joey Votto, Wheeler got out of a bases-loaded jam with only that one run given up.

Wheeler gave up one run on four hits and three walks with seven strikeouts in six innings in his best outing since giving up one run in seven innings, April 11, at Miami.

“I felt good,’’ Wheeler said. “I was able to hit my spots today. I did feel like I was moving a little bit quicker. I felt comfortable with him behind the plate. We were both on the same page.’’

Callaway Not Giving Up On Hitters: The Mets had a chance to win today not because of their offense, but because of Wheeler, Robert Gsellman and Seth Lugo pitching picked them up today.

“Our hitters will come around,” Callaway said. “We did and dig and dig, but sometimes you don’t have an answer. We’ll figure it out.”

With the exception of Cabrera’s .319 average, no Mets starter was hitting higher than Brandon Nimmo’s .255 today. Even so, Callaway is trying to be positive.

“If I were to get angry and yell at people it wouldn’t be productive,’’ Callaway said. “I think the guys have been going about things the right way and we haven’t been winning.’’

Extra Innings: Yoenis Cespedes didn’t start, but grounded out batting for Seth Lugo in the tenth. … The Mets are off tomorrow, then start a three-game series in Philadelphia. The Mets are 40-17 in their last 57 games in Philly, and have outscored the Phillies 307-186 in that span.

Apr 17

Mets Not In Tailspin … Yet

Two losses do not a tailspin make for the Mets, but red flags are waiving. And, if not checked, they have the possibility to derail a season. Let’s take a look at some ugly numbers:

  • The Nationals stole three more bases, and all three runners scored. The final was 5-2, so you do the math. Opposing runners have stolen 21 bases in 22 attempts this season. When the Mets are hitting, it can overshadow that weakness.
  • The Mets went 0-for-9 with runners in scoring position and stranded 11 runners overall. They’ve been leaving a lot of runners on lately and that must change.
  • The strikeouts continue to mount. Mets hitters continue to strike out at an alarming rate. They fanned 12 times tonight. Overall, five Mets starters have more strikeouts than hits: Todd Frazier (17-15), Amed Rosario (16-12), Michael Conforto (12-8), Jay Bruce (13-11) and Yoenis Cespedes (27-13).
  • The starters’ pitch counts continue to be too high for the number of innings worked. Mickey Callaway liked how well Wheeler threw, but 99 pitches over six innings don’t cut it.

Callaway said during spring training that he didn’t care about the Mets’ record, just that they played well. There’s no reason to be concerned about two straight losses. There is a reason, however, to be concerned about how they have played the last two games, even if it wasn’t the Nationals.

Apr 17

Time To Play Nimmo More

As long as Brandon Nimmo is up here, isn’t it about time Mickey Callaway find a way to get him regular playing time. He’s been a terrific pinch-hitter, and always seems to produce when he’s in the lineup like he did last night subbing for Jay Bruce.

As long as Bruce is still bothered by plantar fasciitis, Nimmo should play and he should rest. Nimmo should also play in place of Yoenis Cespedes, who is in a dreadful slump. He needs a few games to clear his head.

It shouldn’t be that hard to develop a rotation with Nimmo, Cespedes, Bruce, Michael Conforto and Juan Lagares.

I understand the need of getting Nimmo regular at-bats at Las Vegas, but he’s here now and the Mets should take advantage of that and get him consistent at-bats while in New York.