Mar 25

Pedro Feliciano Given Minor League Alternative

With Pedro Felciano told he won’t make the Opening Day roster and LaTroy Hawkins informed he would, the Mets’ bullpen appears set.

However, by no means is that cause for celebration.

FELICIANO: Reaching out for his last chance?

FELICIANO: Reaching out for his last chance?

Barring further injury, the Mets figure to keep seven relievers despite probably needed a dozen: Bobby Parnell is the closer with Frank Francisco going on the disabled list; lefthanders Josh Edgin and Robert Carson, both of whom made positive impressions last year; set-up reliever Brandon Lyon; submariner Greg Burke and situational righties Hawkins and Scott Atchison.

Only Parnell was on last season’s Opening Day roster.

For much of last year the Mets carried two lefthanders, but manager Terry Collins was left shorthanded and indicated that wouldn’t happen again.

The Mets burned out Feliciano in his first stint with them, but after he was released by the Yankees, they brought him back as a long shot.

It was thought Feliciano had a shot, but the Mets didn’t like his low 80s readings on the radar gun and offered him a minor league position so he could build up his arm strength. This appears to be a take-it-or-leave it proposal from the Mets, who did not give him a window to hook on with another major league team first.

The Mets had no alternative but to make a decision on Feliciano, because by tomorrow they would have been obligated to pay a $100,000 roster bonus. The Mets, or course, are counting every dollar.

“They told me I’m going to Triple-A for a month and get my strength back,’’ Feliciano told reporters this morning. “I have to talk to my agent first and then see what we’re going to decide.’’

Feliciano might feel slighted, but he’s not dealing from a position of strength and doesn’t have any alternatives. Given that, his best option is to accept the assignment.

Part of his decision-making process includes news left-hander Tim Byrdak, who is attempting to come back from shoulder surgery thinks he could be ready by June.

Things are more settled in the rotation with Johan Santana opening the season on the disabled list and Jeremy Hefner taking his spot in the rotation. The Mets were briefly concerned with Shaun Marcum, who received a cortisone injection in his shoulder last week.

Marcum responded and is scheduled to make his final exhibition start Thursday.

Barring complications, Marcum will start the Mets’ second game of the season, April 3, against San Diego at Citi Field.

The Mets-Padres matchups for the first three games are: Jon Niese against Edinson Volquez on Opening Day, followed by Clayton Richard against Marcum and Matt Harvey against Jason Marquis on April 4.

Jan 27

Jan. 27.10: What would change?

Maybe this will be the summer in which the Mets fire Omar Minaya. It also might be the summer in which they get it all together.

Care to guess which one has a greater chance of happening?

MINAYA: Just how much power does he have?

MINAYA: Just how much power does he have?


At the end of last summer’s disaster, Mets COO Jeff Wilpon and Minaya said there would be trades and free-agent signings. Nothing has happened between then and now to indicate there will be a real change – and, spare me Jason Bay.

It’s known throughout the industry that the Mets just don’t do it the way the model clubs do – and that includes the Yankees and Phillies. There is no definable budget, or at least one that can be easily recognized. And, there was no real setting of priorities.

How else can you explain the setting the goal as pitching at the end of the season, and yet having your key offseason move be a hitter who really had nowhere else to go?

It was reported Joel Pineiro and Jason Marquis set the Mets as their priorities, but the Mets did not respond. No, neither is John Lackey, but either would have made the Mets’ rotation better and deeper than it is today.

The Met were more content to look at last season as an injury-plagued fluke, and ignored such factors as not improving their pitching depth in the 2008 offseason or building their long-criticized farm system as to provide replacements when a starter went down.

OK, the Mets have Bay, but with no other real bidders they coughed up a fifth-year option. … They got into a spitting match with Carlos Beltran, their best player, over surgery, which should have been avoided with surgery in November. … There were no decisive changes in their coaching staff. … And, their pitching remains the same.

Randy Wolf, Pineiro and Ben Sheets all went elsewhere for salaries that didn’t break anybody’s bank. The Mets by the way, had an ERA of just under five a game.

Minaya has made his share of mistakes, beginning with the Luis Castillo and Oliver Perez contracts, but truth be told, ownership signs off on those type of deals. They weren’t done without Wilpon’s blessing.

So, a miserable start – and with that pitching, who doubts that could happen? – could mean the sacking of Minaya. But, that won’t change anything because they are the same old Mets.

Dec 21

Dec. 21.09: Mets miss out on Marquis ….

MARQUIS: Now a Nat.

MARQUIS: Now a Nat.

I spent most of the afternoon in the dentist’s chair. Drove home with the news Jason Marquis – somebody who wanted to play for the Mets – signed a two-year, $15-million deal with the Washington Nationals and bit my lip. Good thing the novocaine hadn’t worn off.

I never had the Mets getting any of the big pitchers, like John Lackey and Roy Halladay, but would settle for a middle-tier arm such as Joel Pineiro, Marquis and Jon Garland.

It’s not that they didn’t get Marquis that is so disturbing, but for how cheaply he went (maybe that does tell you something), but the Mets needed any and all pitching help.

My confidence level in the Mets bringing in an arm of substance is waning, especially considering the news that ESPN is reporting they are considering bringing back Pedro Martinez to a one-year deal at $8 million.

I keep going back in my mind Jeff Wilpon’s vow after the season and Omar Minaya’s pronouncement “we have a plan.”

Think it might be a good time to hear it.

Dec 21

Dec. 21.09: Playing the waiting game ….

We are in the staring phase of the negotiations with Jason Bay and Bengie Molina. The Mets don’t want to go to five years with Bay or three with Molina; the players believe there aren’t many options other than them.

Who blinks first?

If it doesn’t get done this week, don’t expect anything to happen until after the holidays. The Christmas-New Years weeks is traditionally quiet.

The Mets have proven in the past a willingness to wait it out and it might serve them well this time, also. Maybe so, but things have changed over the past few winters. For one, the Mets can no longer reasonably call themselves contenders after last year’s finish. There’s more a sense of desperation.
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Dec 15

Sorting things out ….

BAY: Still on Mets' radar, but they'd better hurry.

BAY: Still on Mets' radar, but they'd better hurry.

The Mets are dealing with the fall out from the bombshell dealings of yesterday.

I don’t know if stonewalling Jason Bay was a ruse by the Red Sox to get John Lackey. I didn’t think they were going to get him anyway, and it has nothing to do with them misreading the pitching market.

Even so, they should be more aggressive in their pursuit for him if he’s their target. Let’s face it, he has to be because they aren’t going to give Matt Holliday what the Cardinals are reportedly willing to do.

If the Mets think Bay will “fall back” to them like Johan Santana did, they could be mistaken. The first impression, and I had it yesterday, was Seattle wouldn’t go for him because they’ll need the money for Cliff Lee.

Perhaps that was premature.

Wouldn’t Seattle be a little more enticing to Lee if there was power in that line-up? Maybe, with Lee, the Mariners see an opening to win this year and will still pursue Bay. Truth is, the Mariners haven’t said Bay is no longer an option.

And, what about the Angels? With Lackey gone and Halladay no longer an option, they have to be looking to do something. Bay was on their radar before. He might still be on it unless the Angels are bent on those middle-tier arms the Mets have been talking about. Truth is, for what they saved in Lackey, they might be able to swing both Bay and a pitcher. And, Bay has to be a better option than Hideki Matsui.
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