May 29

Loney Was Best Possible Available Option For Mets

James Loney might not have been the best player the Mets could have gotten to replace Lucas Duda at first base for the next two months, but considering how they do things he was the best possible option.

The Mets considered several internal options – including Wilmer Flores – but acted with unusual swiftness for them by getting Loney, 32, from San Diego for cash.

LONEY: Best available choice. (AP)

LONEY: Best available choice. (AP)

I would have preferred Adam LaRoche, but the speculated cost in coaxing him out of retirement from the White Sox would probably have been too high. However, I definitely prefer Loney over a mix-and-match platoon of Eric Campbell and Flores. He’s also a better option than moving Michael Conforto or David Wright to new positions.

“Loney was an immediate, obvious possibility in terms of ease of acquisition and a variety of things,” GM Sandy Alderson told reporters. “We had someone go and look at James a couple of games last week and earlier in the month. We felt this was the right move for us at the moment.

“We felt we needed another left-handed bat. James doesn’t have a lot of power. He hasn’t demonstrated that, but we’ve got that elsewhere in the lineup. He’s someone who hits from the left side, a contact hitter, doesn’t strike out a lot. He could be a nice fit for us.”

Manager Terry Collins, whose roots are in the Dodger system as are Loney’s, has known him for 15 years.

“He’ll add a nice dimension to us,” Collins said. “He’s a very good first baseman. He’s a good offensive player. He’s not necessarily a big power guy. He’s a tremendous guy in the clubhouse.”

Loney was released by the Rays this spring and had been with the Padres’ Triple-A affiliate in El Paso, Texas, where he was hitting .342 with two homers and 28 RBI in 158 at-bats.

Loney was to make $9.6 million this year, but because he was released by the Rays, the Mets are responsible for the pro-rated major league minimum for him.

All in all, it was the best possible deal the Mets could have made.

 

Dec 10

GM Sandy Alderson Says Nothing Imminent In Trading Ike Davis

LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. – The New York Mets introduced Curtis Granderson this afternoon. Don’t expect anything more from them today.

General manager Sandy Alderson said nothing was imminent, and that includes trading first baseman Ike Davis.

DAVIS: Nothing moving.

DAVIS: Nothing moving.

“He’s still here,’’ Alderson deadpanned. “We’re here until Thursday. We’ll see.’’

The market is currently not hot – not even warm – for Davis.

One potential trading partner, Milwaukee, is more interested in re-signing Corey Hart than trading for Davis, figuring the devil you know is always better.

Hart and James Loney are on the market, and teams needing a first baseman tend to first look at free agents because all it would cost is money. In trading for Davis, there would also be the surrendering of talent.

“Why would they give up prospects for mediocre talent?” once baseball insider asked about Davis.

Once Hart and Loney are off the market, things might heat up for Davis, but then there is also the matter of competing with Miami, who is taking offers for Logan Morrison, and Texas, which is shopping Mitch Moreland.

So, while the Mets are anxious to move Davis – that anxiousness might parlay itself into lesser offers – don’t count on anything happening soon.

ON DECK: Terry Collins talks to media.

Your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to respond. Follow me on Twitter @jdelcos

Dec 09

Alderson Says Davis Trade Not Imminent

LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. – While the New York Mets would like to deal Ike Davis or Lucas Duda by the end of the week, general manager Sandy Alderson gave no indication today a move was imminent.

DAVIS: Not close to a deal.

DAVIS: Not close to a deal.

Teams are waiting out the Mets in the hope either might be released or that they’d be desperate and drop the price. Alderson said prospective buyers are exploring other options, whether it is in the trade or free-agent markets. Some teams could be offering the Mets little in return, while others want to explore the free-agent market first.

There are a lot of reasons why a trade doesn’t get done.

“That’s always the case,’’ Alderson said. “There’s always going to be an alternative. That’s what provides the tension of negotiating a deal. [Teams] are always looking at what their alternatives are. That’s what provides the tension of getting something done and not getting something done; simply there are other options.’’

Currently, James Loney and Corey Hart are in the free-agent market, while Miami is trying to deal Logan Morrison and Texas is attempting to trade Mitch Moreland.

Of course, it could take one phone call to change everything. A team could offer the Mets a sweet deal, or Alderson can cave just to make a trade.

The latter is highly unlikely.

“Could we do something?’’ Alderson asked. “Yeah, we have that ability. Whether we do it or not is a function of what we can get and what our other options are.’’

Working against the Mets in trying to trade Davis is that other teams are aware of his shortcomings and of the Mets’ overt desire to swing a deal. The Mets have not been subtle in this, and given the high probability Davis won’t be with the team next spring have teams being reluctant.

They aren’t waiting in line to talk trade about Duda, either.

“Everybody is aware of what we have. We don’t have to advertise that,’’ Alderson said. “As far as marketing, [other teams] do their own evaluations. If somebody is not inclined to make a deal for a particular player, it is difficult to talk them into it and get something in return.’’

Your comments are greatly appreciated and I will attempt to respond. Follow me on Twitter @jdelcos

Oct 22

James: Mets’ core pretty good.

James: Likes Wright and Reyes.

James: Likes Wright and Reyes.

The young core some people would like to break up ranks high with analyst Bill James, who ranks David Wright fourth and Jose Reyes ninth in his list of the top major leaguers under 30 years old in his book, “Young Talent Inventory.”

Overall, the Mets are ranked 16th in terms of young talent, which is in the middle of the pack and nothing to get excited about.

Here’s James’ top 25:

?1. Prince Fielder, Milwaukee Brewers first baseman, age 24
?2. Hanley Ramirez, Florida Marlins shortstop, age 24
?3. Tim Lincecum, San Francisco Giants pitcher, age 24
?4. David Wright, New York Mets third baseman, age 25
?5. Ryan Braun, Milwaukee Brewers left fielder, age 24
?6. Dustin Pedroia, Boston Red Sox second baseman, age 24
?7. Matt Kemp, Los Angeles Dodgers center fielder, age 23
?8. Francisco Rodriguez, Los Angeles Angels pitcher, age 26
?9. Jose Reyes, New York Mets shortstop, age 25
10. Nick Markakis, Baltimore Orioles right fielder, age 24
11. Joakim Soria, Kansas City Royals pitcher, age 24
12. Ryan Zimmerman, Washington Nationals third baseman, age 23
13. Cole Hamels, Philadelphia Phillies pitcher, age 24
14. Troy Tulowitzki, Colorado Rockies shortstop, age 23
15. Felix Hernandez, Seattle Mariners pitcher, age 22
16. Jon Lester, Boston Red Sox pitcher, age 24
17. Evan Longoria, Tampa Bay Rays third baseman, age 22
18. John Danks, Chicago White Sox pitcher, age 23
19. Adrian Gonzalez, San Diego Padres first baseman, age 26
20. James Loney, Los Angeles Dodgers first baseman, age 24
21. Stephen Drew, Arizona Diamondbacks shortstop, age 25
22. Brian McCann, Atlanta Braves catcher, age 24
23. Miguel Cabrera, Detroit Tigers first baseman, age 25
24. Grady Sizemore, Cleveland Indians center fielder, age 25
25. Joey Votto, Cincinnati Reds first baseman, age 24

Three other Mets’ prospects, reliever Eddie Kunz, catcher Josh Thole and outfielder Daniel Murphy were selected to play in AFL All-Star Game Friday night.