May 15

Cespedes Should Go On DL

Once again, the Mets are mishandling a key injury, this time it is Yoenis Cespedes, who has a mild strain of his right hip flexor.

General manager Sandy Alderson called the injury “lingering,’’ and added “at some point, this can’t continue.’’

I appreciate Cespedes trying to play hurt, but that’s an effort better served for September and not for the middle of May, 47 games into the season. Cespedes should have been placed on the 10-day disabled list five days ago. If he had been, he would have missed only four games by now and maybe not any more than seven total.

CESPEDES: Will he limp off before DL decision?  (AP)

CESPEDES: Will he limp off before DL decision? (AP)

Cespedes isn’t in tonight’s starting lineup, but could be used as a pinch-hitter if necessary, but that would mean the Mets would lose another day. From the ten days, the Mets have three off days and missed another to rain – assuming tonight isn’t bagged – so they would have gotten off cheap had they done this last week.

The Mets’ medical staff said Cespedes can’t be injured any further, which begs the question: How they really know?

Answer: The don’t.

Cespedes said his hip hasn’t improved since Sunday.

The Mets also misjudged Jacob deGrom’s hyperextended right elbow when they started him Sunday in Philadelphia after one inning. First, they delayed placing him on the disabled list, then they should have pushed him back another couple of days.

In the end, they burned a start.

If they continue to fool around with Cespedes, there’s no telling what they might burn.

May 08

Mets Get Catcher For Harvey

The Mets did better than anybody expected today when they acquired catcher Devin Mesoraco and cash for Matt Harvey, who had been designated for assignment Saturday.

Catching has been a Mets’ weakness since injuries to Kevin Plawecki and Travis d’Arnaud landed each on the disabled list. Mesoraco was activated for tonight’s game in Cincinnati.

The Reds will pay the remainder of Mesoraco’s $13.125 million salary and the Mets will pay the balance of Harvey’s $5.625 million contract.

Harvey will join the Reds this week in Los Angeles.

Immediate speculation, which makes a lot of sense considering Harvey will be a free agent this winter, is for the Reds to hope they can turn him around and try to trade him at the July 31 deadline. The Reds are in last place in the NL Central and it’s clear they won’t sign Harvey this offseason.

Mesoraco, 29, an All-Star in 2014, was hitting .220 with one homer and three RBI for the Reds this season. Injuries limited him to 113 games since the start of the 2015 season.

The Mets had no alternative but to DFA Harvey after he refused a minor league assignment to figure out his mechanics. In eight games, he was 0-2 with a 7.00 ERA this season. Harvey was 34-37 lifetime for the Mets.

The only thing wrong with trading Harvey is that the Mets didn’t do it sooner, like after the 2015 season when he had some real value.

DeGrom Aces Bullpen: Jacob deGrom had a good up-and-down bullpen session today and is on schedule to start Sunday in Philadelphia. DeGrom hyperextended his right elbow swinging the bat last Wednesday against Atlanta.

“I feel like I am good to go,’’ deGrom said.

DeGrom is not expected to bat against the Phillies.

Frazier Goes On DL: Third baseman Todd Frazier was placed on the 10-day disabled list with a strained left hamstring. Frazier is batting .237 with five homers and 21 RBI. In addition, reliever Anthony Swarzak was transferred to the 60-day disabled list.

May 06

Mets Do Right Thing And Will Skip DeGrom

The Mets did two things right during their lost homestand. The first was long overdue when they designated Matt Harvey for assignment Friday. There hasn’t been a hint of remorse or regret from the Mets, or words of being missed by his former teammates.

The second came prior to the Rockies completing their sweep of the Mets today with the announcement – perhaps overdue, but certainly expected – Jacob deGrom will miss tomorrow’s start in Cincinnati.

This came the day after the Mets said he would stay in the rotation.

“The more and more we thought about it, we have to make sure that he’s totally fine,” manager Mickey Callaway told reporters. “He feels no pain and he wanted to pitch tomorrow.”

Coming up from Triple-A Las Vegas to take deGrom’s spot in the rotation against Cincinnati will be P.J. Conlon, who is killing it with a 1-2 record and 6.75 ERA in five starts this season. Last season, at Double-A Binghamton, he was 8-9 with a 3.38 ERA.

DeGrom is 3-0 with a 1.87 ERA in seven starts for the Mets.

“I said I felt like I could go, but I think the bigger picture is what we’re looking at,” deGrom said. “If you go out there and something happens, you end up missing five starts, vs. skipping one and making sure everything is fine. After talking to them, I understand the decision. Erring on the side of caution is what we’re doing.”

DeGrom will throw a 50-pitch bullpen session Tuesday, but will have intermittent rest to simulate real game conditions. Barring a setback, he will throw a bullpen session Friday before his next start.

DeGrom was injured swinging a bat last Wednesday against Atlanta.

 

May 03

Mets Get Positive DeGrom News, But Should Be Cautious

When it comes to Mets pitching injuries, I’ve always said: Bet the over.

One day after Jacob deGrom left Wednesday’s game with a hyperextended right elbow, the Mets cleared him to make his next start after an MRI revealed no ligament damage.

We should know more after he throws Friday in preparation for Monday’s game.

“There’s nothing wrong with him,’’ manager Mickey Callaway told reporters prior to today’s game against Atlanta. “He’s gonna try to make his start on Monday.’’

While that’s positive news, I can’t help but think of the times the Mets were encouraged with Matt Harvey and Noah Syndergaard before they went down long time.

DeGrom said he felt something after swinging at a pitch in the bottom of the third inning Wednesday. He pitched the top of the fourth then left the game.

Seriously, don’t you remember the Mets’ history dealing with injuries? What would it hurt to push him back at start to be sure? That would be better than losing him for the season.

When asked about possible replacements, Callaway did mention Harvey, but Harvey shouldn’t get that chance until the Mets are convinced he’s ready. So far, he hasn’t been sterling out of the pen.

Apr 16

Bullpen Collapses To Waste DeGrom Start

How the Mets respond from losing tonight will send a greater message to the Nationals than their 12-2 record going into the game, which includes a sweep in Washington the first week in April. The here-to-fore excellent Mets’ bullpen coughed up a five-run, eighth-inning lead – and in the process kicked away a brilliant outing from Jacob deGrom – in a potentially defining moment for both teams.

Will the Nationals build off their 8-6 victory and this climb their way back to the top of the NL East? Or, will the Mets revert to the form most expected of them heading into this season?

Or, can they brush this off and keep showing their early-season resiliency?

“It’s one inning — it wasn’t even a game,” manager Mickey Callaway said of the crazy eighth in which five Mets’ relievers faced 12 Washington hitters and gave up six runs. “We outplayed them for the rest of the game. We just have to realize it was one bad inning, we didn’t get the job done. We’ll learn from it and make sure it doesn’t throw us into some kind of tailspin because we’re a real good team and we’ve been showing that.”

That Callaway would even the acknowledge the possibility of one game exploding into a slide shows an understanding of recent Mets’ history.

DeGrom cruised into the eighth, but quickly gave up hits to two of the first three hitters he faced. Callaway went to Seth Lugo, who walked the only hitter he faced to load the bases. Enter Jerry Blevins to face Bryce Harper, who greeted him with a two-run single.

AJ Ramos came in and gave up a single and bases-loaded walk to former Met Matt Reynolds. Then say hello to Jeurys Familia, who gave up a two-run single and another bases-loaded walk. Callaway might expect one or two relievers to have problems, but not the entire bullpen.

“It’s a rare thing. It shouldn’t happen, but maybe guys shut down mentally,’’ Callaway said his relievers collectively mailed it in because they didn’t expect to pitch.

Ramos wanted no part of that thinking.

“We pride ourselves on being ready,’’ Ramos said. “We just didn’t get the job done. There are no excuses.’’

None at all.