Aug 29

Here’s Hoping Mets Are Right On DeGrom Rest

Jacob deGrom isn’t starting tonight because GM Sandy Alderson and manager Terry Collins believe he’s been off his last two starts – 13 runs on 25 hits – due to fatigue.

Let’s hope they are right, because if it is anything else the Mets might be sunk. It’s staggering to think any pitcher could be tagged like that, much less deGrom.

DE GROM: Hoping rest works. (AP)

DE GROM: Hoping rest works. (AP)

From his perspective, deGrom initially said he didn’t feel tired, but later admitted the rest could help. It certainly couldn’t hurt.

DeGrom said he’s physically fine, with no residual effects from a strained lat muscle that briefly sidelined him early in the season. DeGrom is still throwing high heat.

So, why is he pitching like his double in the Geico commercial?

Of the three, velocity, command and movement, deGrom knows throwing hard is the least important.

“It’s hard to get results when you throw everything right down the middle,” deGrom said after getting ripped in his last start in St. Louis. “That’s what it is. I’m missing down the middle and these are big league hitters and that’s what they do.”

If deGrom misses when throwing inside, the pitch tails over the middle. If he’s aiming for the outside corner, it just sits there.

Pitching is all about location, and deGrom is living in a bad neighborhood.

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Aug 26

Why Can’t Collins And Alderson Get Together On A DeGrom Plan?

Why does it take so long for the Mets to make even the simplest decisions? The latest is whether to rest Jacob deGrom after he was roughed up Wednesday night in St. Louis.

“To me, it looks like he’s getting run down,” manager Terry Collins said after deGrom was hammered for the second straight start. In his last two games deGrom has given up a combined 13 runs on 25 hits in 9.2 innings.

DE GROM: Needs rest. (AP)

DE GROM: Needs rest. (AP)

The Cardinals got him for five runs on 12 hits in 4.2 innings. The start before that the Giants hit him for eight runs on 13 hits in five innings.

Collins suggested deGrom could be tired after the Giants’ game, and several times this season attributed the stamina of his starters to their 2015 workload. That was eight days ago, and according to Collins in today’s press briefing, he still hasn’t spoken with GM Sandy Alderson about resting deGrom, which suggests two things.

The first is Collins doesn’t have the authority to unilaterally decide how to use his pitchers. Does he really need Alderson’s permission to push deGrom back a few days or even skip a turn? Do you think Joe Torre needed to talk with Brian Cashman before resting Andy Pettitte?

The second is there’s a lack of communication between Collins and Alderson, which represents a disconnect between the two I’ve suggested several times already this season.

In the two days since deGrom was ripped, couldn’t Collins have picked up the phone to call Alderson to tell him what he was thinking? Or, after reading Collins’ thoughts the next day, couldn’t Alderson have phoned his manager?

Why must there need to be a face-to-face meeting?

If Collins believes deGrom needs to miss a turn, then just do it and stop making this a daily soap opera. How hard can that be?

If Collins tells Alderson “we need to skip deGrom,” then it’s up to the general manager to provide the manager a starter.

The Mets took nearly a month before deciding to put Yoenis Cespedes on the disabled list? They took several weeks before putting Steven Matz on the disabled list? They’ve also dragged their feet on Noah Syndergaard and Michael Conforto and a handful of other issues.

There are 35 games remaining in a season that his slipping away. Sure, you hate to lose a deGrom start, but it’s preferable to miss one now than risk getting him hurt and missing several.

It’s not all that hard. Just make a decision.

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Aug 20

Colon Shows Value; Why They Should Bring Him Back

Sometime this winter, GM Sandy Alderson will have to make a decision – yes or no – on several players. Bartolo Colon will be one of them, and when he does, I hope he remembers today.

With the Mets in dire need of a victory Saturday afternoon to pull them out of their most recent funk, Colon was magnificent working into the seventh in beating the Giants, 9-5.

COLON: Need him back. (AP)

COLON: Need him back. (AP)

Colon is now 11-7, including 6-1 after a loss. That’s well worth the $11 million he makes this season. There are a lot of numbers used to evaluate a pitcher, but record after a loss is especially significant.

Will the Mets bring Colon back for a fourth season? I don’t know. Should they? I think so, and not for the comic relief, which is another way of saying he alleviates tension, and there certainly has been a lot of that this year.

Colon gave up two runs on nine hits with five strikeouts in 6.1 innings. Of his 25 starts, he’s worked into the sixth 16 times and into the seventh nine times.

Did I mention he’s 43?

The Mets brought Colon back for this season with the idea of moving him to the bullpen in July when it was hoped Zack Wheeler would come off the DL. Wheeler could be shut down the rest of the season. Next year is pure speculation for Wheeler.

That’s also the operative word for Matt Harvey, who underwent shoulder surgery. Not to mention Steven Matz, who will undergo surgery on his elbow, and is now having shoulder issues. Noah Syndergaard also has a bone spur issue that could necessitate surgery.

Of their core five of young arms that was supposed to make the National League playoffs the “Mets Invitational,” Jacob deGrom is the only one you can say with any confidence will be on the 2017 Opening Day roster. Nobody throws the “ace” word in Colon’s direction, but he’s the stopper in this rotation.

So, why wouldn’t you bring back Colon?

Speaking of players returning, the Mets have far less control over Yoenis Cespedes, who drove in three runs with two homers and a double. He also sent a third ball to the warning track.

It’s a double-edged sword for the Mets with Cespedes. They need him to go on a tear similar to last year if they are to make a playoff run.

However, the hotter Cespedes gets, and with the free-agent market for right-handed hitters next year paltry at best, it increases the odds of him opting out and going on the market. There’s no reason why he wouldn’t.

The Mets would have him for the next two years for $50 million if he decides to stay. But, if he tests the market it will cost the Mets much more, and, why wouldn’t he test the market again.

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Aug 13

Three Mets’ Storylines: On This Night Lady Luck Smiled

Jacob deGrom gave the Mets the kind of performance Saturday they desperately needed from him as they hoped to snap a four-game losing streak. For a long time it looked as if deGrom would come away with another no-decision when Jeurys Familia coughed up the lead.

However, the Mets manufactured the game-winning run in the 11th when Neil Walker scored on Wilmer Flores’ fielder’s choice grounder up the middle to give them a 3-2 victory over the San Diego Padres.

WALKER: Celebrates. (AP)

WALKER: Celebrates. (AP)

The play was set up by Walker’s hustle as he went from first-to-third on James Loney’s bloop single to left.

“That was a heads up play,” a relieved Mets manager Terry Collins said. “This was a good game for us to win.”

The Mets won it on Flores’ grounder up the middle, but instead of trying for the double play, Padres second baseman Ryan Schimpf tried for the play at the plate.

“I thought it was going to be a double play,” Collins said of his first thoughts after the ball was hit.

For a team that has played in back luck lately, this could be a sign things could turn.

DeGrom was brilliant in his effort to pick up his struggling team and took a 1-0 lead into the seventh, but Yangervis Solarte homered with two outs to tie the game.

DeGrom had to be thinking “here we go again,’’ until Kelly Johnson’s pinch-hit sacrifice fly in the bottom of the inning regained the lead for the Mets.

Addison Reed stuffed the Padres in the eighth, but Wil Myers tied the game with two outs in the ninth on a homer off Familia. It was Familia’s third blown save and the first homer he has given up this year.

The other key storylines from the game were Jose Reyes‘ return and Curtis Granderson‘s continuing struggles.

REYES RETURNS: Reyes came off the disabled list, hit leadoff, and played shortstop. He went 0-for-3 and scored on Walker’s single.

Reyes took second on a wild pitch, and on the same play advanced to third on a wild throw by catcher Christian Bethancourt. The sequence illustrated Reyes’ speed, an element the Mets have lacked.

However, later Reyes struck out with a wild swing, an element we’ve often seen from the Mets, and by him frequently in his first tenure here.

GRANDERSON’S FUNK CONTINUES: There’s no let up in Granderson’s miserable season as he went 0-for-5 with a strikeout.

Overall, he is 10-for-77 with RISP, including 2-for-39 with two outs and RISP.

Prior to the game, Collins said Granderson’s playing time might be cut once Yoenis Cespedes returns.

If things continue like this for Granderson maybe the Mets will consider benching him before.

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Aug 13

Mets Need DeGrom To Pitch Like An Ace Tonight

The word “ace” has been thrown around a lot lately regarding the Mets’ young rotation. The label was applied – erroneously, perhaps to Matt Harvey – and Noah Syndergaard and Steven Matz have come up short.

DE GROM: Mets need him tonight. (AP)

DE GROM: Mets need him tonight. (AP)

That leaves us with Jacob deGrom (7-5, 2.35 ERA), who after a stretch of 10 winless starts from May through June, has pitched well winning four of five decisions.

Of all those young arms, I was always highest on deGrom, and he’s pitched like an ace. It’s not a reach to say he’s kept the Mets afloat.

During those two bad months, his command was off and velocity down. He looked tired and drained physically with his pitch-count was too high compared to the number of innings pitched.

However, he’s turned things around and in his last eight starts has a near two mph., bump in his velocity. While the movement on his fastball is better, so is the command of his secondary pitches. During that span he has a 1.52 ERA and threw a one-hit shutout over the Phillies, July 17.

DeGrom is pitching to the level the Mets always hoped he’d reach, but more importantly to the level they must get from him.

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