Jun 14

Moving Granderson To Third Is Best Mets Can Do

The argument for the Mets using Curtis Granderson in the leadoff spot last year was his high on-base percentage. Fueled by 91 walks, it was a solid .364 last season, which enabled him to score 98 runs.

His current numbers refute that argument. Granderson’s on-base percentage is a puny .316 this year with only 27 walks, but 61 strikeouts. These are numbers not befitting a leadoff hitter, which is why the decision to move him to third in the order, sandwiched between Asdrubal Cabrera and Yoenis Cespedes is a good one.

GRANDERSON: Seeking a spark, Mets move him to third on order. (Getty)

GRANDERSON: Seeking a spark, Mets move him to third on order. (Getty)

Actually, there is not much else the Mets could have done. They aren’t hitting, especially with runners in scoring position. They aren’t getting on base. They have three starters on the disabled list and Neil Walker’s back and Michael Conforto’s wrist have them sidelined. With no help coming from the minors or in a trade, it is time to tinker.

With no help coming from the minors or in a trade, it is time to tinker. Moving Granderson to a traditional RBI spot seems like a logical first step, For his 12 homers, he should have a lot more than 20 RBI.

The Mets’ order tonight reminds me of when managers of slumping teams pulled the lineup out of a hat. It’s not quite that bad for Terry Collins, who was released from a Milwaukee hospital and will be on the bench.

Here’s tonight’s order:

Alejandro De Aza, LF: His .181 average isn’t encouraging, but he’s fast enough to be considered at the top of the order.

Cabrera, SS: Is hitting .267, but has been fairly consistent. Is not really a No. 2 hitter in the classic sense, but is comfortable here.

Granderson, RF: Not the prototypical No. 3 hitter, but his power (12 homers) fits in the middle of the order. He should have more RBI and should get more opportunities more RBI opportunities with Cabrera, and perhaps in the future, Juan Lagares hitting ahead of him. Hitting ahead of Cespedes, his walks could increase.

Cespedes, CF: Has hit five of his 16 homers with RISP. Overall, in the 57 games in which he has played, he’s batting .282 with 16 homers, 40 RBI and 34 runs scored. In his first 57 games with the Mets last year, he hit .287 with 17 homers, 44 RBI and 39 runs scored.

Kelly Johnson, 2B: Is 4-for-9 since coming over from Atlanta. Has gone 55 at-bats since his last homer, so he’s due.

Wilmer Flores, 3B: Is hitting .406 (13-32) since taking over for David Wright. Hit a game-winning single to beat the Pirates, June 8, at Pittsburgh.

James Loney, 1B: Has done well in place of Lucas Duda, including hitting a two-run homer, June 3, at Miami. Is a lifetime .314 hitter against Pirates.

Kevin Plawecki, C: Hitting only .205. I can see the Mets sticking with Rene Rivera as the backup when Travis d’Arnaud comes off the disabled list probably next week.

Jacob deGrom, P: Lost to the Pirates, June 7, giving up three runs in six innings. DeGrom hasn’t registered a win since April 30, getting two losses and five no-decisions in that span.

As I wrote the other day, the Mets are floundering and in dire need of a spark. Maybe this is it.

Jun 01

June 1, Mets’ Lineup Analysis Vs. White Sox

Jacob deGrom starts to get the Mets back on the winning trail after the pitching broke down Tuesday night. First, Steven Matz lost in all at once and the bullpen – after Noah Syndergaard – never had it. That would be Hansel Robles, who gave up five homers in May.

mets-logoball-2Here’s the lineup behind deGrom:

Curtis Granderson – RF: Is heating up, batting .303 (10-33) over his last ten games. His on-base percentage still must improve.

Asdrubal Cabrera – SS: Is very comfortable hitting No. 2. Has hit in 10 of last 12 games. Has 12 career homers vs. White Sox.

Michael Conforto – LF: After blazing April settled down and is hitting .261 with eight homers and 24 RBI. Still hitting third for the most part.

Neil Walker – 2B: Moved to cleanup with Yoenis Cespedes getting the day off. Off the top of my head, who is the last cleanup hitter who played second base. Maybe Robinson Cano.

James Loney – 1B: Hitless in for at-bats in his Mets’ debut. Hit .280 in 104 games in 2015 with Tampa Bay.

Juan Lagares – CF: Average is up to .278. Would like to see more of him in the lineup.

Ty Kelly – 3B: Today’s third baseman of the day. He’s the fifth different player to play the position. This is Kelly’s fourth start at third.

Rene Rivera – C: Good to see him play. Nothing against Kevin Plawecki, but the staff ERA with Rivera is nearly a run better.

deGrom – RHP: First start against White Sox. Is coming off his fourth straight no-decision. Has given up three runs or less in seven of eight starts.

COMMENTS:  Cespedes is hitting .462 (6-13) and Alejandro De Aza (.571) lifetime against White Sox starter Miguel Gonzalez but are not starting. And, Granderson is hitting .071 against Gonzalez. Puzzling. And, please don’t tell me about rest. De Aza hardly plays and Cespedes could rest almost any time. … Wright not in today, but Mets could know more about placing him on the DL later today.

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May 31

Mets Wrap: Looking At Wright’s Future And The Bullpen Meltdown

A bad back ended Don Mattingly’s career, one that could have landed him in the Hall of Fame had he not been injured and forced to retire at age 34. A bad back ended Larry Bird’s career. The Mets are facing the same prospect with David Wright.

WRIGHT: What's he thinking now? (AP)

WRIGHT: What’s he thinking now? (AP)

Wright spent four months on the disabled list with spinal stenosis last season. He’s currently facing the prospect of the disabled list with a herniated disc in his neck. The Mets delayed the disabled list when they made room for James Loney by sending Eric Campbell to Triple-A Las Vegas.

When the Mets gave Wright a long-term contract in December of 2012, they pared down the amounts for the last two seasons in anticipation of his skills diminishing. Wright will get $20 million a season through 2018; $15 million in 2019 and $12 million in 2020.

With his recent injury history, manager Terry Collins told reporters he’s sensing those skills fading now.

“This guy has been a special player,” Collins said. “Certainly being the captain and the face of this organization, a manager’s worst nightmare is to see a star start to fade. I think David’s got a lot of baseball left in him because of the way he prepares and the way he gets himself ready. But it’s hard to watch what he’s going through.

“He’s still special. He’s still a great player. We just hope this neck thing goes away in a few days and he’s back in our lineup.”

Wright didn’t play in Tuesday’s 6-4 loss to Chicago to miss his fourth straight game, and the injection he received will take at least two more games before taking effect. That makes the disabled list a real possibility.

It won’t happen this season, but the Mets and Wright should be thinking about the next four years because it is fairly obvious he’s not going to make the end of his career at third.

There are several options:

FORCED RETIREMENT: They could buy him out, which is what they did with Jason Bay and Michael Cuddyer. Neither side wants this, but Wright’s pride probably will make him consider this option over time.

Wright, at 33, has seven homers, but only 14 RBI, He has a respectable .350 on-base percentage. What is not are his strikeouts, with 55 in 137 at-bats. Wright is batting .226 with 31 hits. If you flipped the strikeouts with hits, his average would be .401. That emphasizes the importance of the strikeouts.

There are a lot of reasons for the strikeouts, with his back one of them. I know Wright doesn’t like how he’s playing, but I also know he has too much pride and integrity to just take the money. He has to know something has to change.

POSITION CHANGE: Where would he go? First base and left field are the only possibilities.

I floated the idea of left field last summer because it would have the least amount of stress on his back. His throwing shouldn’t be a problem because he wouldn’t have to throw sidearm.

There’s less pounding on his back in the outfield because he won’t have the deep bending before every pitch. I know you’re thinking about Michael Conforto, but it wouldn’t hurt to try him at right field. As far as Curtis Granderson, he has one more year after 2016.

Yes, there’s crouching at first base, but it isn’t as intense as playing third base because a lot of time he’ll be holding runners which does not require as deep a crouch.

As a corner infielder, Wright should quickly pick up the nuances of the new position. As for Lucas Duda, the Mets don’t have to offer him arbitration and he can leave as a free agent.

METS GAME WRAP

May 31, 2016, @ Citi Field

Game: #51          Score:  White Sox 6, Mets 4

Record: 29-22     Streak: L 1

Standings: Second, NL East, two games behind the Nationals.  Playoffs: Tied with Pittsburgh for No. 1 WC.

Runs: 194    Average:  3.8   Times 3 or less: 24

SUMMARY:  Steven Matz finally broke down by giving up three runs in the sixth inning, and the bullpen imploded by giving up three runs. The consensus was Matz was rushing his pitches. Matz worked 5.2 innings, but he was getting hit so I have no problem with pulling him at that time. I don’t think Collins had a quick hook.

Noah Syndergaard, who threw only 34 pitches Saturday before being ejected, worked the seventh and threw 17 pitches. If they were going to use Syndergaard in relief, why not let him work one more inning? It would be like his throw day between starts. Had Syndergaard worked the eighth, there wouldn’t have been the Hansel Robles meltdown.

Robles gave up three runs on one hit – Tyler Saradino’s two-run homer – and two walks.

Giving Syndergaard another inning would’ve been the way to go, especially since he said Jeurys Familia wasn’t available.

KEY MOMENT: Saradino’s two-run homer. … Matz was coasting before he gave up a two-run homer to Todd Frazier.

THUMBS UP: SNY had a good night with its feature on catching. Gary Cohen, Keith Hernandez and Ron Darling calling the game from the stands was a nice angle. By the way, a little ketchup on a hot dog isn’t such a bad thing. … Matz for five innings was pretty good. … The Mets manufactured a couple of runs on two sacrifice flies. … Neil Walker’s two-run homer was his 13th of the season. … Granderson had two hits. … Jim Henderson and Syndergaard in relief.

THUMBS DOWN:  If Collins wasn’t going to use Syndergaard for more than an inning, then why not give Henderson a full inning? He only threw two pitches to get out of the sixth. Maybe using Syndergaard screwed up Collins’ bullpen rotation. If that is the case, then Syndergaard shouldn’t have been used. … Watching Saladino steal second and third uncontested in the sixth and score on a single is giving away a run. Overall, the White Sox stole four bases with ease. … Mets hitters struck out nine times, went 2-for-7 with RISP and stranded nine runners. … The idiot who called Collins “coach.’’

EXTRA INNINGS:  James Loney started at first base and committed an error. He went 0-for-4. … Before Tuesday night, Matz had given up two runs or less in seven straight starts. … The Mets have homered in 11 straight games. … The Mets’ bullpen has given up 20 earned runs in its last 21 innings. … Overall it has given up 15 homers.

QUOTEBOOK: “He said he was rushing a bit and all the balls were over the middle of the plate.’’ – Collins on what catcher Kevin Plawecki said of Matz’s problem.

BY THE NUMBERS:  4: Number of walks and homers Robles has given up in his last 13 hitters.

NEXT FOR METS:  Jacob deGrom will start Wednesday afternoon.

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May 21

May 21, Mets’ Lineup Against Milwaukee

Jacob deGrom will try to give the Mets their second straight victory this afternoon against Milwaukee. He is coming off back-to-back no-decisions in his last two starts.

Here’s the lineup behind him:

Curtis Granderson – RF: Hitting .115 (3-for-26) with RISP. Career .253 hitter (22-for-87) vs. Milwaukee.

David Wright – 3B: Hitting .185 (5-for-27) with RISP. Career .261 hitter (60-for-230) vs. Milwaukee.

Michael Conforto – LF: Hitting .303 (10-for-33) with RISP. Career .500 hitter (2-for-4) vs. Milwaukee.

Yoenis Cespedes – CF: Hitting .270 (10-for-37) with RISP. Career .400 hitter (10-for-25) vs. Milwaukee.

Neil Walker – 2B: Hitting .320 (8-for-25) with RISP. Career .270 hitter (95-for -352) vs. Milwaukee.

Asdrubal Cabrera – SS: Hitting .276 (8-for-29) with RISP. Career .250 hitter (1-for-4) vs. Milwaukee.

Eric Campbell – 1B: Hitting .182 (2-for-11) with RISP. Career .250 hitter (5-for-20) vs. Milwaukee.

Kevin Plawecki – C: Hitting .286 (4-for-14) with RISP. Career .333 hitter (3-for-9) vs. Milwaukee.

DeGrom – RHP: Is 3-1 with a 1.38 ERA in four career starts vs. Milwaukee.

COMMENTS:  Campbell is in the lineup because Lucas Duda has a sore back. … Jeurys Familia is 14-for-14 in save opportunities. … Cespedes is third in the NL with 33 RBI. … Nine of Conforto’s 16 career homers have either tied the game or give the Mets the lead.

May 16

Mets Should Skip Matz Against Nats

Steven Matz’s sore left forearm will be examined today, if it hasn’t already, at The Hospital of Special Surgery. If he gets a good review, he’ll throw off the mound Tuesday and possibly pitch Wednesday or Thursday.

I’m guessing Wednesday, because unless there is something wrong with him, I don’t see manager Terry Collins bumping Matt Harvey. Harvey is a basket case now and there’s no telling what demons would pop into his head if he’s skipped against the Nationals. If anything, after Harvey’s last start, he must get back on the mound. The last thing the Mets need with Harvey is for him to think more than he’s already doing.

MATZ: No need to rush. (AP)

MATZ: No need to rush. (AP)

I don’t see the urgency for Collins to juggle his rotation for the Washington series, regardless of what happened in Denver. The Mets are 1.5 games out of first place, and even if Washington sweeps them that leaves them 4.5 games behind with 16 games remaining against the Nationals to be played over 121 games with over four months to go in the season.

There’s plenty of time.

Frankly, juggling the rotation for one Matz start against Washington smacks of panic. The Mets had a plan with their pitching that until the weekend had them in first place, so there’s no reason to deviate now. Although Colon and Harvey were hit hard in their last starts, the problem is the offense.

The Mets are coming off a 4-7 trip, including being swept in Colorado. They scored 32 runs during the 11 games (2.9 average per game), and scored less than three runs six times. They were shutout twice.

They are playing poorly and this isn’t the best time to face the Nationals regardless of whom the Mets start. This series won’t make or break the season, but that’s the impression the Mets are giving by pushing Matz. If this is that crucial a series they should have skipped Jacob deGrom Sunday, or bring him back on three days rest.

If you recall, Harvey’s problem first stemmed with a sore forearm he tried to pitch through. The best option would be to continue with Colon and Harvey, skip Matz and go through the rotation one more time before going with him. They should put Matz on the disabled list, backdated to May 11, the day after his last start, and re-insert him into the rotation on May 25, which coincidentally enough, is at Washington.

The Mets played short since Matz’s injury, and putting him on the disabled list would enable them to add a bench player, preferably, one who can hit.

Matz needs to rest and take his time with this. The Mets don’t need Matz this week, they need to score some runs.

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