Oct 08

Cespedes Just Fruitless Wishful Thinking

Sure, Yoenis Cespedes is an intriguing name, but like those that came before him – Troy Tulowitzki and Carlos Gonzales to name just two – it’s just more wishful thinking about something that has very little chance of happening.

I don’t want to rain on your off-season parade, but as good as he is, Cespedes will be too costly for the Mets, both in terms of potential salary and the prospects they must surrender to get him.

CESPEDES: To dream the impossible dream.

CESPEDES: To dream the impossible dream.

Let’s look at salary first.

Cespedes will make $10.5 million this season, after which he will become a free agent. The Mets can afford the $10.5 million for one year, but why would they give up talent for a one-year rental? That makes no sense.

As they did with Johan Santana, the Mets will have to agree to terms with Cespedes on a multi-year extension before completing a trade. That’s the way these things work. No extension; no trade.

Cespedes’ demands – and I’m guessing here – could be in the area of five-plus years and close to $90 million, if not more.

When you consider a five-plus contract for Cespedes, you must also take into consideration money they’ll be paying David Wright, Curtis Granderson, and in the future, possible long-term deals with Matt Harvey and Zack Wheeler.

As far as what it would cost in terms of talent to acquire Cespedes, remember the Red Sox gave up Jon Lester, who is better than anybody in the Mets’ rotation.

Personally, how far-fetched is it to think Boston might not just re-sign Lester, which would give the Sox both Lester and Cespedes.

Sure, Jon Niese is just one name, but it will also have to take some of the young pitching among Harvey, Wheeler, Noah Syndergaard or Jacob deGrom. One of those four, plus Niese, is the starting point.

Sure, I like Cespedes and he’s look good in a Mets’ uniform, but I’ve been watching them long enough to know there’s little chance of this happening.

It’s fun to think about, but that’s what the off-season is all about.

Right?

Sep 26

The Obstacle In Trading For Power

It isn’t that Daniel Murphy doesn’t have value to another team in a straight trade; it is he won’t be able to bring back much in return by himself.

With the Mets’ greatest need power; Murphy is a line-drive gap hitter with limited power. To acquire a 30-homer bat, the Mets would have to sweeten the pot considerably. That would mean dealing one of their pitchers. The Mets don’t want to trade Matt Harvey, Zack Wheeler, Noah Syndergaard and Jacob deGrom, as that is their core.

The most likely pitchers they’ll offer are Jon Niese and Dillon Gee. Perhaps both. That probably won’t get it done, either.

The way I see it, to get a power bat the Mets must spend in the free-agent market or offer more in a trade. Because past history indicates they likely won’t do either, I see them hoping for bounce-back seasons from David Wright and Curtis Granderson, and improvement from Lucas Duda to get their power.

Otherwise, they’ll probably come back next season with roughly the same team.

 

 

Sep 21

DeGrom Shines Again In Sweep Of Braves

There isn’t any doubt in my mind Jacob deGrom should be the National League’s Rookie of the Year. What he did in today’s 10-2 rout of the Braves to complete a rare sweep in Atlanta – one earned run with ten strikeouts in six innings – should seal it.

What today also might have sealed – although Terry Collins isn’t saying – is deGrom’s ledger for the season. The Mets figured 180 innings for deGrom this year and he’s at 178.2.

Collins will make a decision early this week.

“We’ll regroup here in a couple of days and decide what we’re going to do with him as far as his next start goes,’’ Collins told reporters after the game. “He’s real close to where we wanted him to get anyway on the season. We were talking from 180 to 185 was going to be max anyway. We’ll just see if he starts the next game.’’

DeGrom: Impressive again. (AP)

DeGrom: Impressive again. (AP)

Collins said he’s impressed with deGrom’s stuff, both on the mound and from within.

“I know one thing: He walked in here and he said he wanted to pitch,’’ Collins said. “He’s not sitting back saying, ‘OK, I’ll just shut her down.’ He wants to go back out there.

“That was impressive to hear. This time of year, in our situation, it would have been very easy for a lot of guys to say, ‘I’m done. I’m washed up.’ He’s not like that.’’

Collins has been impressed with the Mets’ unwillingness to pack in the season, and that’s a good reflection on him and why he’ll be back.

I have no problem with the Mets shutting down deGrom now, although it would be nice for him to take a bow at Citi Field in the season’s final weekend. The Mets are being ultra cautious, which is what to expect from them evidenced by their treatment of Matt Harvey and Zack Wheeler.

If today was deGrom’s final start, he finished at 9-6 with a 2.63 ERA, 43 walks and 144 strikeouts. Those are definitely Rookie of the Year credentials.

Assuming deGrom is shut down, Rafael Montero would start next Saturday against Houston

Sep 12

Gee Pitching For Next Season, Likely Not With Mets

Dillon Gee has pitched well for the New York Mets and he’s pitched poorly. He beat the Washington Nationals tonight, but Gee wasn’t sterling, giving up three runs in 5.1 innings. He was lucky he didn’t lose tonight.

By definition, it wasn’t a quality start, and illustrated why Gee is what he is for the Mets and won’t be anything more than a fifth starter. And, if things go as the Mets envision, he won’t have one of those spots next season.

The 2015 rotation figures to be Matt Harvey, Zack Wheeler, Jacob de Grom, Jon Niese and Bartolo Colon. Gee threw 108 pitches tonight, which doesn’t get it done. One hundred pitches should have put him through seven and into the eighth. That not only applies to Gee, but the other starters, also. Wheeler and Niese are also known for running up the pitch count.

Normally, I might say Gee is pitching for a look-see next spring. Barring an injury, Gee would make the team out of the bullpen, but the logical spot-starter/long relief role is earmarked for Carlos Torres.

Gee made $3.6 million this season and is arbitration eligible this winter. However, he’s 7-7 with a 3.80 ERA, numbers that hardy warrant a huge raise.

Gee is a gamer. He pitches with guile and grit, and at 28 has a lot of innings remaining. He just doesn’t have the stuff of a Wheeler or Harvey. He’ll probably get two more starts this year to make an impression.

Somebody is sure to have noticed and he’ll be in somebody’s camp next spring. It just doesn’t figure to be in Port St. Lucie.

 

 

Sep 09

Not Concerned About Syndergaard’s Feelings

One of these days, Noah Syndergaard might develop into a franchise pitcher. Then again, like thousands of other live arms to try, he might be bust out. Nobody can say for certain.

NOAH: Not ready for prime time.

NOAH: Not ready for prime time.

Regardless, it was no surprise to learn he would not be part of the September call-ups. And, his numbers weren’t worthy of a promotion. He’s 9-7 with a 4.60 and 1.48 WHIP indicate there’s more work to be done. I have no issue with Syndergaard not being promoted; especially considering we knew it wasn’t going to happen this year.

Matt Harvey and Zack Wheeler were in similar situations and weren’t elevated to delay their arbitration eligibility. What I have a problem with is Syndergaard not paying attention to what happened with Harvey and Wheeler before him and not draw a similar conclusion.

Not only won’t we see Syndergaard this year, but there’s no way he’ll be in the 2015 Opening Day rotation. The earliest we’ll see him is the beginning of June.

With Sandy Alderson saying there won’t be a splurge in the free-agent market and the team wants to hold onto its young pitching, there’s not room for Syndergaard in April. Next season’s rotation to start the season will be Bartolo Colon, Harvey, Wheeler, Jacob deGrom and Jon Niese. Syndergaard at the start just won’t happen, and the only disappointment is him not realizing his situation.