Feb 24

Mets’ Manager Terry Collins Wants Players To Reveal Injuries

Ike Davis isn’t the first New York Met to withhold an injury from manager Terry Collins and won’t be the last.

He’s just the latest, and his recent revelation he concealed an oblique injury last season perplexed and frustrated his manager.

COLLINS: Not pleased with Davis. (AP)

COLLINS: Not pleased with Davis. (AP)

As Davis struggled at the plate, he denied anything was bothered him. On Sunday he opened up to the New York Post and indicated he didn’t report anything to the medical staff because it was about the time he was to be optioned to Triple-A Las Vegas and didn’t want people to think he was making excuses.

Davis admonished the reporter Monday morning, and by the afternoon Collins was in the storm – and not pleased about it.

“There’s got to be a conversation,’’ Collins told reporters in Port St. Lucie. “And then certainly it’s up to me to decide which way to proceed. … As I look back now, everything would have been better off had he said something, and certainly he’ll hopefully learn from it that he needs to speak up.’’

Davis defended his actions, telling The Post, players perform injured all the time and he didn’t want to come off as making excuses. At the time, Davis said he was fine, but clearly something was off.

Collins said it goes beyond pain and discomfort.

“Once again, I can’t address it because I don’t know how bad it was,’’ Collins said. “Was it aggravating? Was there pain? Did it hurt you to swing? Were you trying to protect it coming off the ball? I mean, there’s all sorts of different things. And I certainly don’t have any answers for you.’’

All managers receive a daily report from the training staff on the extent of an injury and whether the player received treatment. If Davis said nothing, then Collins wasn’t given any information.

That this story came out the way it did is embarrassing to Collins and the Mets, an organization that has received its share of criticism on how it treats injuries.

The Mets received heat for how it dealt with injuries to Ryan Church, Carlos Beltran, David Wright, Jose Reyes and Pedro Martinez to name a few.

Last summer, they were embarrassed when the story broke that Matt Harvey wasn’t forthcoming on pain to his forearm, which eventually landed him on the disabled list and under the knife.

There were conflicting reports as to when Collins and the Mets’ hierarchy knew of Harvey’s injury. Collins said he never received a trainer’s report.

Of course we can speculate – and rightfully so – as to whether that lack of disclosure cost Harvey this season.

One understands a player’s desire to perform and help his team, but such intent isn’t always beneficial. Harvey, Davis and the Mets would all have been better off had players reported the injury immediately.

Not doing so shows poor judgment, but it is also something players have done for years, especially young players such as Harvey and struggling ones like Davis. Sometimes fear, and sometimes the competitive juices drown out good judgment.

No, Davis won’t be the last Met to feel something and hold his tongue.

ON DECK: Wrapping the day.

 

Feb 24

Mets’ Ike Davis Doesn’t Like Story; Did Not Refute Accuracy

New York Mets first baseman Ike Davis isn’t happy with a recent story that concealed an oblique injury last season.

DAVIS:  Unhappy with story. (AP)

DAVIS: Unhappy with story. (AP)

Davis said he didn’t report the injury because he was about to be optioned to Triple-A Las Vegas and didn’t want it to sound like an excuse.

On Monday, Davis did not refute the Post’s Mike Puma’s accuracy, but instead took him to task for writing it in the first place.

“You made it look like, you know, it’s an excuse,’’ Davis said. “That’s not what the story — it shouldn’t have been a story anyway. Because that’s what we talked about before you wrote it, was we shouldn’t write this, because that doesn’t matter. But that was nowhere in the article.’’

There are two things to note: 1) if Davis didn’t think it was a story, he shouldn’t have answered the questions, and 2) he should have been more forthcoming about the injury.

When he saw Puma writing in his notebook, he had to know there would be a story.

Even manager Terry Collins said had he known of the injury the team might have handled things differently.

To his credit, Davis didn’t deny the quotes, and in his strongest comment as a Met, said: “I sucked last year because I sucked. It’s not because I had an injury.’’

I’m glad Davis didn’t hide under the “I was misquoted’’ umbrella, and here’s hoping he learned something.

We admire athletes who play with pain, but sometimes playing with an injury could come back to haunt them. I have been critical of Matt Harvey and David Wright playing injured, if for no other reason they risked further injury and might have jeopardized their team’s chances of winning.

With Harvey, doing so might have caused his elbow injury and subsequent surgery. With Davis, it might have lead to a dreadful season and the Mets’ desire to trade him.

When you’re a gamer like Wright, like Harvey and like Davis, nobody will question when you call in sick one day.

ON DECK:  Thoughts on Nelson Cruz

Feb 20

Strikeouts Do Matter For Mets

After writing about the high strikeout rates of Ike Davis, Chris Young and Lucas Duda, I received a question asking why my concern over strikeouts, with the reader saying, “there’s no difference between a strikeout and a soft grounder to second.’’

He couldn’t be more wrong.

First, a strikeout is a non-productive out, but much more can happen on a grounder to second, especially with less than two outs.

A grounder to second, or anywhere in the infield, or a fly ball, has the potential to create something positive while nothing can be generated from a strikeout unless the ball gets by the catcher. And, unless R.A. Dickey is pitching, how often does that happen?

A runner can score on a grounder to second. He can’t on a strikeout.

Also, with a soft grounder to second, there’s a chance the ball could get through for a hit or the fielder could muff it for an error. Either way, it leads to a base runner and potential run, or if there’s a runner on second or third, it could generate a run.

See the difference?

In addition, a grounder can advance a runner into scoring position.

When I once asked Davis about his propensity for striking out, he said, “I am a home run hitter. I like to hit home runs. Strikeouts are part of it.’’

Until he changes that attitude, he’ll never be a viable hitter.

I realize times have changed, but to me one of the most incredible statistics in history is that during his 13-year career, Joe DiMaggio hit 361 home runs, but only struck out 369 times.

Arguably, that might be more impressive than his 56-game hitting streak.

Carrying it a step further, last year the Mets struck out 1,384 times, or 8.5 times a game. Translated, they went a third of the game without making contact.

Still wonder why I think it’s a big deal?

Feb 19

Wrapping Up The Day: Front Office Silent On Alderson; Market Still Open For Ike Davis

Neither Fred Wilpon nor Sandy Alderson was in a talking mood when the topic of the general manager’s future was raised today in Port St. Lucie.

Wilpon wouldn’t say if he would address the media during spring training while Alderson simply said he has another year on his contract and no control over his future.

According to a published report, Alderson is interested in staying on another two or three years.

Elsewhere in camp:

* The trade market for Ike Davis remains open with both Pittsburgh and Baltimore monitoring Mets’ camp.

* Daisuke Matsuzaka threw 50 pitches in a bullpen session and said he is anxious to face hitters.

* Matt Harvey prefers to rehab in New York with the team during the season and not in Port St. Lucie. According to the Collective Bargaining Agreement, the Mets can’t force him to stay in Florida.

* Assistant general manager Paul DePodesta forecasts a 155 innings limit for Noah Syndergaard.

* Position players are scheduled to report Thursday. Also on Thursday, Mets coaches will attend a meeting with officials of the Cardinals and Marlins on the rule of catchers not being allowed to block the plate.

 

Feb 19

Trade Market Still Open For Ike Davis

New York Mets general manager Sandy Alderson could be getting a second chance to trade first baseman Ike Davis.

The Mets didn’t want to go into spring training with the Davis-Lucas Duda logjam at first. However, their steep asking price coupled with their openness, if not eagerness, to trade Davis worked against them.

DAVIS: Still on the block.

DAVIS: Still on the block.

They appeared to favor Duda because of his better on-base percentage matched against horrific first-halves by Davis in 2012 and 2013. Davis’ 32 homers in 2012 seemed more and more fluke-like to Alderson.

Consequently, he tap-danced around their failure to trade Davis by saying he didn’t mind the open competition. Davis, from his perspective, said he was “in a bit of shock,’’ to still be with the Mets.

As spring training progresses teams with unsettled situations at first base will likely call the Mets about Davis, who’ll make a reasonable $3.5 million this year.

Reportedly, two of the original teams interested in Davis – Pittsburgh and Baltimore – are monitoring the Mets about Davis.

After losing lefty-hitting Justin Morneau in the off-season, the Pirates are considering a platoon of Davis with right-handed hitter Gaby Sanchez.

The Orioles meanwhile, are considering Nelson Cruz and Kendry Morales; both were made qualifying offers from Texas and Seattle, respectively, and would cost a compensatory draft pick.

The Orioles, who just lost the 17th overall pick in June’s draft for signing pitcher Ubaldo Jimenez from Cleveland, would not have to surrender a pick to the Mets if they signed Davis.

Alderson misjudged the market over the winter. With a second opportunity, he can’t afford a repeat, especially after making it known he wanted to trade Davis.

 MORE LATER TODAY