Apr 13

Lagares Out Of Leadoff Spot

That was fast. The Mets’ Opening Day lineup features Curtis Granderson back in the leadoff spot and Juan Lagares dropped down to seventh. The move comes on the heels of Lagares going 0-for-5 Sunday in Atlanta.

LAGARES: Batting seventh. (AP)

LAGARES: Batting seventh. (AP)

Manager Terry Collins said he still has confidence in Lagares, who hit .359 in spring training.

“If he continues to swing the bat like he can, he’ll be in the leadoff spot,” Collins said of Lagares. “Right now, he’s struggling a little bit. So we kind of like where he’s at. We’ve got all the confidence in the world. When that confidence fades, we’ll find somebody else. But, right now, this guy is one of the real, real good players and an up-and-coming star in this game.”

After a strong spring training in which he worked on working the count and other aspects of leading off, Lagares began the season in the sixth spot in the order. The Mets insist they’ve considered the switch early in spring training, but puzzlingly didn’t act on it.

Lagares is admittedly struggling, batting .160, but then again Granderson is hitting .063.

While I understand the nuances of the leadoff hitter is assured of leading off an inning just once, and that when he’s batting it really doesn’t matter because he’s at the plate by himself. However, going into the season’s seventh game, Lagares is hitting in his third different spot in the order.

That indicates indecision.

Here’s today’s order for the Mets:

Curtis Granderson, rf

David Wright, 3b

Lucas Duda, 1b

Michael Cuddyer, lf

Daniel Murphy, 2b

Travis d’Arnaud, c

Juan Lagares, cf

Wilmer Flores, ss

Jacob deGrom, rhp




Apr 08

DeGrom A Most Intriguing Met

Of all the Mets’ young pitchers, I am most intrigued with Jacob deGrom, last year’s NL Rookie of the Year and Wednesday’s starter at Washington. Quiet and unassuming, unlike Matt Harvey, deGrom came out of the bullpen last season following an injury to Dillon Gee and never left the rotation.

Hopefully, he’ll stay in it for years.

Why deGrom over the others?

DeGROM: Captures the imagination.  (Getty)

DeGROM: Captures the imagination. (Getty)

Well, Harvey is Harvey, and despite his hype, all too often he leaves the impression he’s more interested in becoming a New York media darling instead of a Mets’ star. There’s a big difference.  Also, I can’t shake the feeling he’s just passing through Queens until he relocates to the Bronx.

Fair? Maybe not, but that’s the perception.

I get the feeling if deGrom stays healthy he’ll have a longer career with the Mets than Harvey.

The same applies with Zack Wheeler, but for a different reason.

Wheeler’s elbow injury went from bad to worse, and it won’t be until late in the 2017 season until we might really know something about him. By then, it is hoped he would have developed command to go with his natural stuff. So far, that lack of command lead to high pitch counts that stressed his arm.

But, for right now the main intrigue is his health.

As for Noah Syndergaard and Steven Matz, yeah, there’s interest. However, the intrigue meeter won’t click on until Sandy Alderson forgets this Super Two nonsense and brings them up here. Until then, they are wishful thinking.

But deGrom?

Well, he’s here and now. He seems real; he’s not a diva. We saw what he did last year coming out of nowhere, and it whet our appetite for more. He went 9-6 despite an offense that provided little support and a shaky bullpen. What was eye-popping was a 2.69 ERA and 144 strikeouts in 140.1 innings. That’s dominating stuff. And it continued in spring training as he showed no signs of letting up with a 2.08 ERA, .167 opponent batting average and 0.73 WHIP in 26 innings.

What I also like is he’s not a know-it-all. He exudes confidence without being abrasive, and also a willingness to learn evidenced by working hard on his breaking pitches during spring training. He also took copious mental notes watching Bartolo Colon on Opening Day.

“I watched what Bartolo did,” deGrom told reporters in Washington. “He just located and kept the ball down and threw the ball really well. That’s always my game plan, to throw strikes and keep it down.”

As with Harvey, the Mets will carefully monitor deGrom’s innings early in the season.

“I’ll just go out there and go as long as they’ll let me go,” he said.

And, that might be good enough.

ON DECK:  More on the lineup.

Apr 03

Why The Rush On Murphy?

Sure, I want the Mets to play Daniel Murphy as much as anybody. I’ve long advocated keeping him while there have been voices to trade him. We all know he’s gone after this season, because there’s no way the Mets will extend his $8-million contract.

But putting him on the Opening Day roster now – they will decide Saturday – is pushing the envelope when they don’t have to.

They extended Juan Lagares and are considering doing the same for Lucas Duda, but Murphy isn’t in their long-term plans. However, they seem adamant about the short term, which is placing him on the Opening Day roster despite having played sparingly the past two weeks with a pulled right hamstring.

Because he played in minor league games this week, the Mets can backdate his time on the disabled so he would only miss the first six days of the season. Murphy took five at-bats in an intra-squad game Thursday, but did not play in the field. He could play in the field today, but there are no guarantees.

Hamstrings are tricky to begin with and the Mets initially described it as tightness, then subsequently a pull. Even so, GM Sandy Alderson later only called it a mild strain. Doesn’t he read the papers? Alderson told reporters there’s been “a significant upgrade in his status from a couple of days ago.”

Even so, Murphy hasn’t done any serious running, so what’s the allure of sending him out there in the cold weather of Washington? Remember, the Mets pushed back Matt Harvey until the third game of the season so he would start in the afternoon when it would supposedly be warmer.

In the big picture, what’s the purpose of the first six days? Why risk further injury that would keep him out longer, perhaps for several more weeks? Some risks aren’t worth taking, and this is one of them.



Feb 22

Santana’s Arm Weakness Could Delay Spring Debut By Two Weeks

johan santana springSandy Alderson told reporters today the Mets Spring Complex, that left-hander Johan Santana’s first Grapefruit League start would be pushed back by as much as two weeks.

Alderson said that there was no structural issue and that it is just a matter of building up strength in Santana’s arm. Initially, Santana was scheduled to make his first Grapefruit League appearance on March 2nd, but a lack of velocity during his last bullpen session raised concerns.

The Mets presumed Opening Day starter says he is in no pain, but obviously this is something to keep an eye on.

According to the Mets GM, Santana will do some long-tossing once he gets back on a mound and no timetable for his return will be set until further evaluation.

Santana, 33, has not pitched in a game since being shutdown by the Mets last August and was prescribed rest for the offseason.

We’ll keep you posted as this story further develops…

Mar 29

Bay ailing … so what else is new?

Carlos Beltran is scheduled to play this afternoon, which could be a dicey gamble because if something happens they won’t be able to back date him the last ten days in spring training. What good is one game, say five innings in a Grapefruit League game going to do?

BAY: Not smiling now.

Not much. A tweak and he could be on the disabled list for at least two weeks into the season.

Right, I know what you’re thinking …. where he could join Jason Bay.

Bay was scratched from today’s game with pain in his rib cage. These things take time, so Bay going on the DL (it would be retroactive to March 24), isn’t out of the question. Considering these are the Mets it’s probably a certainty.

Nice timing on optioning Nick Evans, wouldn’t you say? It Bay goes on the DL Lucas Duda would open the season on the 25-man roster. So, on days when Beltran is off, we’ll have an outfield of Duda, Willie Harris and Scott Hairston. Kind of inspiring, wouldn’t you say?

Meanwhile, the Mets are trying to convince Jason Isringhausen to stay in Port St. Lucie for an extended spring training, which would allow them to keep Blaine Boyer. Isringhausen is 38 and has pitched well this spring. He might decide he doesn’t want to stay in Florida, and if so, somebody will claim him

In addition, Boyer has an out clause in his contract any might opt to hook on elsewhere. If they can pull this off and be able to keep both Isringhausen and Boyer it would be sweet, because you know they are going to need them eventually.