May 04

Are Mets Too Eager To Deal Murphy And Gee?

Scouts were in town over the weekend to watch the Mets Daniel Murphy for the purpose of trading for the third baseman. Specifically the Giants, who didn’t bring back Pablo Sandoval last winter, have the most interest.

The Mets really aren’t in a good position when it comes to possibly trading Murphy because there’s little doubt they will bring him back next year. Given that, unless there’s a line out the door of suitors for Murphy, the Giants probably won’t have to come up with a big package.

Under the Sandy Alderson era, the Mets have traditionally asked for too much in the trade market, and the same might happen again if it were solely about Murphy. What the Mets might think about doing is making that package include Dillon Gee, whom they are also eager to deal.

This could work because the Giants have pitching depth issues and need another arm.

While it is easy to understand why San Francisco, which is having a down year, might want Murphy and Gee, the motivation for the Mets to deal one or both is to clear salary and make room for younger talent. However, if the Mets are to be the contender they hope to be this season they will be gambling their young talent of infielder Dilson Herrera and possibly Noah Syndergaard will adjust to the demands of the major leagues and be able to immediately give them what Gee and Murphy can.

The Mets want to get something for Murphy and Gee before they leave, which is understandable. But, I would rather the Mets make the playoffs and they walk and get nothing, than dealing them now and missing October.

Seems to me the Mets are too eager to get rid of them.



Apr 08

Today In Mets History: Seaver Wins Behind Kingman, Torre

On this date in 1975, backed by Dave Kingman’s first homer as a Met and Joe Torre’s RBI single, Tom Seaver out-dueled Steve Carlton to defeat Philadelphia, 2-1, on Opening Day at Shea Stadium.

SEAVER: Beats Carlton in classic.

SEAVER: Beats Carlton in classic.

Felix Milan lead off the ninth with a single to right, moved to second on a walk to John Milner and scored on Torre’s single to left.

You know about Seaver, the greatest player in franchise history and a Hall of Famer with 311 career victories, with 198 coming as a Met. He also pitched for Cincinnati (acquired in a 1977 trade from the Mets), the White Sox and Boston.

Hard to believe Tom Terrific is 70 years old.

Torre played three seasons for the Mets (1975-77) and become their manager in 1977. He played 18 years in the majors and finished with 2,324 hits and a .297 average.

Torre managed five seasons with the Mets (winning 286 games), three with Atlanta, six with the Cardinals, three with Los Angeles, and 12 with the Yankees, where his teams won 1,173 games, six pennants and four World Series titles. Those numbers with Yankees sent him into the Hall of Fame.

As for Kingman, the overall No. 1 pick with the Giants, played six years for the Mets, with whom he hit 154 of his 442 career homers. He also played for San Francisco, Oakland, the Cubs, San Diego, California Angels and Yankees before retiring after the 1986 season.

While Seaver and Torre are in Cooperstown, it would have been interesting to see if Kingman would have made it had he hit 500 home runs.


ON DECK: Previewing Jacob deGrom‘s first start.

Mar 10

Today In Mets History: First Exhibition Game

On this day in 1962, the expansion Mets played their first exhibition game, which they lost, 8-0, to the St. Louis Cardinals in St. Petersburg, Fl.

Mets pitchers Jay Hook, Clem Labine and Craig Anderson gave up a combined 12 hits, including homers by Gene Oliver and the late Minnie Minoso.

The Mets would go 40-120 in their inaugural season and finish 60 ½ games behind the first place Giants. They also finished 18 games behind the ninth-place Cubs.

ON DECK: Let’s see more of Fred Wilpon.

Feb 20

Mets Should Cherish Own History And Forget Yankees

I keep reading how this is the time for the New York Mets to “take control of the city and make this their town.’’

That’s an impossible venture based on history as the Yankees have a huge head start. I’ve been told this was once a National League town, but how can this be if the Yankees usually won?

METS: Their own history is pretty good. (MLB)

METS: Their own history is pretty good. (MLB)

Math says the Yankees have 27 World Series titles while the New York Mets, Giants and Brooklyn Dodgers won a combined eight. I was never good at math in school, but understand those numbers.

Only the 1921, 1922 Giants and 1955 Dodgers beat the Yankees head-to-head in a World Series.

The Mets will never take permanent control of the city. Just as the Jets won’t take it from the Giants; the Nets from the Knicks; and Islanders from the Rangers.

Those teams will always be the younger brother.

But, that doesn’t mean for one glorious summer, or two, or three, the Mets can’t be New York’s darlings. It happened in 1969 and 1986. But, temper that because from then to the present the Yankees won seven titles.

The Yankees’ mission statement always has been to win the World Series. That hasn’t changed since George Steinbrenner’s passing and won’t as long as long as the team remains in that family. The Mets want to win, but that’s not their mission statement. And, for readers of this blog who have long complained about their spending, you understand that concept. Worry about the perception of who owns the city once the Mets change their philosophy.

I’m not interested in the Mets catching the Yankees. That’s beating their head against a brick wall. What I am interested in is seeing the Mets catch the Washington Nationals, St. Louis and whoever comes out of the West.

You can also throw in the Braves and Marlins in that group. Those are their real rivals. The Mets and Mets’ fans should keep their eyes on the real prize, which is winning their corner of the world.

I didn’t grow up here, but can’t count the number of times I’ve walked through the concourses at Shea Stadium and Citi Field after a Mets’ victory and heard fans chant, “Yankees suck.’’ And this wasn’t after an interleague game with them. Why couldn’t they enjoy what they had just seen? Somebody please explain that to me.

Boston fans did the same for years. Even at a Patriots’ Super Bowl rally Bostonians chanted “Yankees suck.’’ I also heard it when the Red Sox finally won as I walked from Busch Stadium back to my St. Louis hotel.

The Mets – and I include Mets’ fans in this – should ignore what the Yankees are doing and take care of their own business. If they do that, they’ll own the damned back pages of the tabloids. It’s the hot team, the one that makes the most noise, that grab the back pages.

Growing up in Cleveland, Indians’ fans had that same fascination with the Yankees. I always thought it was acknowledging an inferiority complex. Don’t worry about keeping up with the Yankees’ Joneses and take care of your own house and you’ll get the attention.

The Mets will never convert a true Yankees’ fan just as the opposite is true. But, for one summer they can get those straddling the fence to find their way to Queens instead of the Bronx.

The Mets have their own history and it is worth cherishing. Never forget that.


Feb 18

Today In Mets History: Pitchers And Catchers Report For First Time

On this date in 1962, Mets pitchers and catchers had their first workout in St. Petersburg. It is the first time the Mets’ uniform was seen in public.

The Mets have always struggled to find their own identity in New York, and part of that can be attributed to the design of their home uniform and colors. Orange was taken from the Giants; blue from the Dodgers, and pinstripes from the Yankees. If you consider Shea Stadium, the walls were Dodger blue and the foul poles were Giant orange.

There have been uniform modifications over the years, but basically the same color scheme with pinstripes.

Pitchers and catchers report today, undergo physicals tomorrow and have their first workout Saturday.

Manager Terry Collins will be away from the team for several days after the passing of his father, Loren Collins, 95, in Midland, Michigan.