Aug 06

Reyes coming to Earth?

Jose Reyes said he’s 100 percent, but he’s not really. He’s not been the player he was before going on the disabled list with a hamstring, and while he’s still had a good year, he once again served reminder of the dangers of giving him a long-term contract in the neighborhood of seven years.

REYES: Vulnerabilities showing.

The offensive rap on Reyes has always been giving away too many at-bats at the plate and falling back into bad habits, such as pulling off the ball and adopting an uppercut swing.

What were line drives and crisp ground balls have turned into weak fly balls and pop ups. He’s taking a 2-for-13 slide into tonight’s game against the Braves, including nine fly ball outs.

Reyes has had had a marvelous season and somebody will give him a payday this winter. If not the Mets, then somebody.

However, two things have surfaced to warrant caution in anybody dealing with Reyes, with the first being his propensity to injury and breaking down.

He hasn’t played in 150 games since 2008, and since 2003 has only logged at least 150 games four times. From 2005 through 2008, Reyes had at least 56 stolen bases.

For a player who makes his living with his legs, there are breakdown signs for the 28-year-old Reyes.

With his health always a concern, so is his performance. Players will always have slides and slumps, but there are still holes in Reyes’ game that indicate Carl Crawford money of $142 million over seven years – which Fred Wilpon said he would not get – will be unattainable.

After three years of leading the NL in stolen bases, he has 32 now, his most in four years. His on-base percentage on .376 is the highest of his career, but how much is that playing for the contract? His career .339 on-base is more representative of his capabilities, and that’s not worthy of Crawford money. I don’t know if it is worth more than a $100,000 million package.

He’s never walked more than 77 times in his career and has only drawn 29 this summer. His career strikeouts-to-walks ratio is 498 to 319.

Reyes is a good player having a good season, but as the last few weeks have shown, there are vulnerabilities in his game that say Wilpon might have been right all along.

 

Jun 07

Today in Mets History: Remembering the Duke.

It’s always interesting to look back at some of the old Mets. Some great players made a cameo in New York at the end of their careers.

SNIDER; One last moment in the Polo Grounds.

For example, Duke Snider, who hit a three-run homer on this date in 1962 off Diomedes Olivio in the ninth inning to give the Mets a 3-2 victory over St. Louis in the Polo Grounds. It wasn’t quite the Dodgers and Giants in the 1950’s, but for one day there was a Golden Age flashback in New York.

Interesting story about when Snider first joined the Mets.  Charlie Neal had No. 4, but wouldn’t give it up to Snider. Snider eventually got the number when Neal was traded.

Snider was popular with Mets’ fans who still held an emotional connection to the Dodgers – no doubt, Fred Wilpon fell into this category. Of course, what makes the Mets unique is their roots are found in two other teams, which has caused the franchise to constantly seek its own identity.

That hasn’t always been easy, and the team took considerable heat in the opening of Citi Field, which featured the Jackie Robinson Rotunda and had little acknowledgement of the Mets’ own history.

The following season, in what really was an ironic and sad turn, Snider was traded to the Giants and retired after that year.

SNIDER’S CAREER NUMBERS

 

Jun 03

David Wright update; talks with Fred.

WRIGHT: Wants to stay.

David Wright is expected to have another X-Ray taken on his back today. Obviously, there’s no timetable for him, and there won’t be until the tests are completed.

It bothers me it took so long for him to be diagnosed with the stress fracture. Blame him for putting the tests off and the Mets for not being insistent. There’s no reason why he played another month in discomfort.

Meanwhile, Wright reportedly has spoken with owner Fred Wilpon, and said: “All is well. I think it’s been well documented that I enjoy playing here and I hope I can be doing that for a long time.’’

Trade rumors are part of the game and they continue to swirl around him and Jose Reyes because of the Mets’ financial problems.

Trading Wright might bring back several prospects in return, but the loss of what a healthy Wright can do on the field and the marketing of him is hard to measure.

 

May 25

How much does Alderson know about Wilpon’s finances?

GM Sandy Alderson said a $100 million budget is news, and he hasn’t spoken with owner Fred Wilpon about next season. Alderson anticipates a payroll between $100 million and $145 million. That’s a wide berth, and the spectrum ranges from being able to compete to being a bottom feeder.

ALDERSON: How much does he know about Wilpon's finances?

When he took the job, Alderson said expectations are high in this market and meeting them means spending. Alderson said it is not guaranteed the Mets won’t make an offer to Jose Reyes. There can be no assumption made, Alderson said, Reyes will be is gone.

Alderson has made some conflicting comments regarding his role and the Mets’ financial picture. He said going in he knew money would be tight around the Mets, and indicated just because money will be come off the books doesn’t mean there will be wild spending next winter. He also said he’s been assured there’s enough money to make a contract proposal to Reyes.

How big that proposal is uncertain, but there doesn’t appear to be any indication it will be made any time soon.

Considering Alderson’s reputation, I find it difficult to believe he doesn’t have greater knowledge of Wilpon’s financial problems then he is letting on. Maybe not to the penny, but definitely with a handle on next season’s budget.

How do you take such a job without knowing that information?

Or, considering he took the job at the urging of commissioner Bud Selig, maybe he knows it all and is just minding the store until it is sold.

May 24

Damage control by Wilpon and Mets.

In what best can be described as panic damage control, owner Fred Wilpon apologized to Carlos Beltran and Jose Reyes in a conference call this afternoon. Wilpon also left a message to David Wright.

REYES: Biding his time.

 

On SNY, there’s a feature on the 1969 team, as if that will prove a distraction from today’s mess.

Meanwhile, at Wrigley Field this afternoon the Mets held a “let’s band together’’ team meeting in the wake of Wilpon’s comments and news the team will lose $70 million this season. Beltran said he’s 100 percent and not the 65 to 70 percent Wilpon claimed.

Reyes said all the right things, such as the owner Wilpon can say what he wants, and “I’ll give the team everything I can. … I’ll continue to do my job and play my game.”

Reyes will not talk about his future. He’s not lobbying to stay here.

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