Jun 20

Not Enamored With Collins’ Decisions Or Reasoning Friday

Jacob deGrom had only thrown 97 pitches when he was pulled in the eighth inning of Friday night’s 2-1 loss at Atlanta. He deserved better, from his defense, his bullpen, and his manager. Come to think about it, he deserved better from his general manager, too.

DE GROM: Should have stayed in. (AP)

DE GROM: Should have stayed in. (AP)

Betrayed is too strong a word, but he was definitely let down. DeGrom took a slim 1-0 lead into the eighth because the Mets’ anemic offense stranded six and was 1-for-5 with runners in scoring position. This offense has done little for much of the year, and even less the past month.

After Andrelton Simmons doubled to lead off the eighth, most everybody in the park knew Eury Perez was going to lay down a bunt to the third base side. DeGrom pounced on the ball and immediately looked to third, but Ruben Tejada wasn’t by the bag. Had he been there, deGrom would have nailed the runner.

Not a natural third baseman, Tejada botched the play, but manager Terry Collins said he had no problem with his handling of the play.

“We’re trying to get an out there,” Collins told reporters, adding Tejada did the right thing.

I beg to differ. Strongly. Yes, they are trying to get an out, but that out needed to be at third and not first. How were they going to do that if Tejada wasn’t covering third?

I can buy Collins if he was trying to protect the inexperienced Tejada’s fragile ego. But, here’s where I have a problem with GM Sandy Alderson. HIs job is to ensure the Mets have the appropriate talent needed to win games and this is not the first time they’ve been left with a thin bench and poor bullpen choice.

Pedro Ciriaco followed with a grounder to shortstop Wilmer Flores, who took too long looking the runner back to third and couldn’t get the runner at first.

The Braves now had runners on the corners with one out when Collins summoned Sean Gilmartin.

“I thought it was time,” said Collins. Yes, time to lose the game.

DeGrom is the Mets’ best pitcher and only had thrown 97 pitches. Collins mentioned the pitch count, but deGrom’s defense opened the door.

There was nothing deGrom did to warrant being pulled. Collins knows he has an unreliable bullpen with the exception of Jeurys Familia. If deGrom is to be considered ace-like his manager must show him the confidence to make it through the inning.

Collins’ best choice was to stick with deGrom or go to Familia to close the eighth.

Gilmartin was not the best decision, evidenced by Jace Peterson promptly doubling in two runs to waste another good start.

Yes, deGrom deserved better. Much better.


May 03

We Will Know Mets’ True Feelings About Flores On Tuesday

It is a measure of how current GM Sandy Alderson – and the Mets’ brass in previous years – mislead fans that some of us are skeptical of the explanation given for the recent benching of shortstop Wilmer Flores.

FLORES: Resting again. (Getty)

FLORES: Resting again. (Getty)

It was no secret the Mets tried to obtain a shortstop during the winter, and several times Alderson cracked wise at Flores’ expense. Even when circumstances dictated Flores would be the Opening Day starter – primarily because they had less faith in Ruben Tejada – the Mets were reluctant to make the announcement.

After Flores committed an error which helped beat Jacob deGrom Thursday and his seventh the next night behind Matt Harvey, manager Terry Collins said he would rest the shortstop Saturday. Collins said it was his plan all along to Tejada a day. At the time, Collins said if he pulled Flores now it could destroy his confidence and he could never return to shortstop.

Alderson said: “We know he can catch the ball. The important thing right now is to make sure he understands we have confidence in his ability to catch the ball. He’s demonstrated it. This is not a hope and a prayer. He’s demonstrated it in the past. We know what limitations may exist at that position for him. This is not one of them — or shouldn’t be one of them. The short answer is: Yes, he’s got plenty of room.”

Collins emphasized his confidence: “You’ve got to give him a chance. You’ve got to give him a legitimate chance. … If this kid is going to be a big league player, he’s got to be able to get through some of these times. And therefore the leash has got to be long.”

Flores wasn’t in the lineup Sunday, which makes sense because coupled with Monday’s off day that would give him three straight days in which to clear his head.

However, what can we make of it if Flores isn’t in the lineup Tuesday against the Orioles?


Dec 08

Are Mets Sabotaging Flores?

I have been writing over a month Wilmer Flores should be the Opening Day shortstop. Speaking to reporters at the Winter Meetings in San Diego, GM Sandy Alderson all but confirmed it.

“I’d say where we are today, that’s the likelihood. But that doesn’t mean it’ll happen,’’ Alderson said. “But if you look around at all the possibilities, is it more likely than not? Probably.’’

FLORES: Don't undercut him.

FLORES: Don’t undercut him.

To that, I say it is about time.

Alderson began his regime promising a more open dialogue, but what we’ve been getting have been smokescreens and diversions. Let’s face it, Troy Tulowitzki was too absurd to consider, and Jed Lowrie and Stephen Drew aren’t worth considering.

Alderson mentioned the possibility of January. If you’re going to wait that long, what does it say about the Mets’ level of confidence in these players? It says they don’t have much, if any.

It also screams cheapness and indecisiveness.

By the way, if the Mets are rebuilding as they say, you don’t do it by filling such a key position as shortstop with rejects. And, before you say you don’t build with guys like Flores, either, save it because we don’t know about him.

You build with your own players before you look outside.

All of this speaks little of the Mets’ faith in Flores. All this talk of trying to replace him can’t help his self-esteem. What the Mets are doing with Flores is the same thing they did with Ike Davis and that’s a shame.

The Mets constant negativity directed at Davis made it impossible for him to function here. I am afraid they are doing the same with Flores.

Why won’t they learn?

ON DECK: Do Mets really have pitching depth to trade?

Dec 05

Flores Buys Mets Time

With the Winter Meetings days away, the Mets’ shortstop options are dwindling. You can scratch Didi Gregorius from their list today after Arizona traded him to the Yankees in a three-way deal that also included Detroit.

GREGORIUS: Never a real option. (Getty)

GREGORIUS: Never a real option. (Getty)

We’ve gone over the Mets’ options several times this week, and to me it all comes back to Wilmer Flores. Flores isn’t without concerns, otherwise we wouldn’t be going over this topic again … and again … and again.

I’ve written several times why Flores should be first in line, ranging from his salary to the asking price from other teams in terms of prospects and salary for any potential replacement. These players, including Gregorius would tie the Mets’ hands in terms of payroll and years.

However, Flores would only burden the Mets for one season, and they enter 2015 as playoff long shots in the first place. Flores buys them time to figure out their shortstop dilemma and that’s attractive to the Mets. If Flores works out, that’s a plus. If he doesn’t, there’s always next year.

I would hope if the Mets were sure about Flores one way or another they would be more proactive.

Dec 02

Look For Mets To Keep Tejada And Non-Tender Young

The Mets have until midnight today to decide whether to tender contracts to infielder Ruben Tejada and outfielder Eric Young. Speculation has the Mets keeping Tejada and cutting Young loose for economic and practical reasons.

The Mets are uncertain about shortstop but appear to be leaning to unproven Wilmer Flores. Given the high probability of not acquiring a “name’’ shortstop this winter, the Mets need a fallback if Flores doesn’t work out. And, at a projected $1.7 million, Tejada is an inexpensive option.

Meanwhile, Young, who’ll make over $2 million, won’t start because he can’t crack the outfield of Michael Cuddyer, Juan Lagares and Curtis Granderson. Young’s 30 stolen bases would be missed, but the Mets prefer the friendly contracts of Kirk Nieuwenhuis and Matt den Dekker.

So, unless something unforeseen happens the rest of the day, Tejada will stay and Young will go. Quite simple, really.