Aug 25

When does a gesture become more than a gesture?

It’s a noble gesture, but one that will have little sting or impact.

Tonight, fans are to meet for the “Citi Field Sit Out,’’ in which the organizers got their message across on the Internet to meet at the ballpark to express their displeasure at the Mets organization by boycotting the game.

The gesture is symbolic and won’t create change simply because management has shown no inclination it wants to change. Management will laugh off the boycott because it already has their money.

As the Mets become more irrelevant heading into September, it should be realized there is little to be done to energize an alienated fan base for the remainder of the season. There is only one gesture symbolic enough for the fans to appreciate there could be a real change and it’s not the firing of Jerry Manuel or Omar Minaya, which could be soon enough. The only gesture the Wilpons can make to the fans that will be symbolic enough to bring about a genuine hope for change would be cutting Oliver Perez.

It will say things will be different.

Manuel and Minaya could be gone, but if the same group of underachieving players is around, what good will it do?

And, all indications are things will be the same because without spending a dime on new players to get better, the Mets have $130 million committed to salaries for next year, with roughly $50 million earmarked for Perez, Luis Castillo – the poster boys for the Minaya regime – Carlos Beltran and Francisco Rodriguez.

The Mets are notorious to not wanting to throw money away, which is why they’re still paying Perez and going with a 24-man roster. The message sent to the clubhouse in keeping Perez at a time when the season was still salvageable was that of surrender.

With a trade almost impossible, next year will likely be as frustrating as this season. Any enthusiasm the team can muster for the 2011 season will be tempered by Perez’s presence, as it will signify nothing has changed for the better no matter how they dress up a new manager or youth movement.

Perez leaving might create a large enough buzz among those thinking of going to Citi Field in September, and even more importantly those on the fence about renewing season tickets, to believe there is sincerity in wanting to change.

Perez is going to get $12 million from the Mets next year either way, so it might as well be in the form of a public relations gesture.

Because without real change, the season ticket base will continue to erode, spending will be further cut, and there will be more symbolic boycotts _ and losing.

There will be more of the same.

Aug 20

We’re not stupid.

I know it is too much to ask for, but I would like some direction from the Mets’ organization. I know they are under the misguided impression  they have to put on a competitive face to sell tickets in September, but we all know that part of the season has been over since the West Coast trip after the All-Star break.

The Wilpons won’t fire Manuel and Minaya now – they probably will keep Omar because of his contract – because there’s no sense paying two people to do the same job.

But, I would like them to tell us what direction the team is heading. Is it rebuilding, which seems to be obvious or are they delusional like Manuel and think there’s still a season?

The public will come out and support this team next year if they are honest with us. But, if they keep leading us on is when we’ll turn on them and leave Citi Field empty.

They feat they can’t be open because they think they are in competition with the Yankees for the city, but they really aren’t. Yankees fans are Yankees fans and Mets fans are Mets fans. There might be some “baseball” fans who follow both teams, but each team generally has its own fan base.

The Yankees fan base has no doubt the direction of its team. The Mets should feel the the same. We’re not stupid. Tell us you’re rebuilding and be done with it.

We are willing to give the benefit of doubt if you’re honest with us.

Aug 19

On Backman ….

There’s no way Jerry Manuel will survive after this season. Whoever replaces him will have to be marketed to a disgruntled and discouraged fan base.

The one guy who will work and won’t break the bank, and who has won at his level, but hasn’t managed on the major league level is Wally Backman.

The Mets need to market fire and intensity, something that has been lacking, and Backman meets that description. Because of his background and ties to the 1986 championship team, Backman is somebody the team can market and the public will buy.

The downside is his lack of major league experience, but the Mets have to weigh this against the public relations upside.