Oct 02

Collins and Warthen Want Front Office To Retain Mike Pelfrey

Terry Collins and Dan Warthen would like the front office to retain Mike Pelfrey next season, according to Adam Rubin of ESPN.

“I know Terry Collins and I are very hopeful that Mike Pelfrey will come back — whether it be in the bullpen or as a starter,” pitching coach Dan Warthen said.

“We’ve always contended that he would be a great closer and just go out there with a power sinker and a split. I think we’d see 95 to 97 mph almost every night. When it comes to cost, we have to find out what we can afford. But I think we would all love to have Mike back.”

Pelfrey was shutdown after three starts in April and finished with a 2.29 ERA and 13 strikeouts in 19 2/3 innings pitched.

He underwent Tommy John Surgery on May 1, and most like will not be ready to pitch off a mound again until June or July. In the meantime he’ll be rehabbing and doing his workout with these exercise programs. It’s still a long road and one that could have setbacks as we’ve seen before on the Mets.

Pelfrey signed a one-year, $5.7 million contract with the Mets to avoid arbitration in January. He is eligible for arbitration again this winter and per MLB rules he cannot be offered less than 80% of his current salary.

He will be non-tendered for sure and become a free agent  who can deal with all 30 teams.

There’s a nice upgrade for us, let’s talk about this for a while.  :-)

Seriously, I had issues with Pelfrey when he was healthy, let alone now. Can we just move on already. If you want to take a trip down memory lane go and see what the Marlins want for Reyes or the Cardinals for Beltran. At least I know we’ll be bringing back stars rather than duds.

Sep 12

Mets Matters: Bay’s Concussions; Daniel Murphy Scratched

Speaking to the media prior to tonight’s game, manager Terry Collins said Jason Bay’s concussions have contributed to his poor showing at the plate. Bay, who is in tonight’s line-up, is hitting .158 with seven homers and 18 RBI in 198 plate appearances.
“I just think that those concussions take an effect on guys,” Collins said. “There are times when you see everything you thought that he could bring to the table — great defender, a good thrower, power, a tremendous teammate. And then, all of a sudden, there will be some times where he struggles. He has no answers to it. This time in his career, we know it’s still there. Hopefully with the winter recovery, maybe you’ll get something next spring that will really come forward.”
I’m not saying Collins is wrong, but it does raise a couple of questions. The first is, how can the concussions be an issue when Bay was struggling mightily before he was injured? The second is, if the concussions were an issue, then why was Bay cleared to play? If there is a residual effect of the concussions, shouldn’t Bay have been shut down longer.
Another issue, is if the concussions are really the root of Bay’s problems, then shouldn’t the Mets consider releasing him if the contract is insured?
Also:
* Daniel Murphy was scratched from tonight’s game with lower-back stiffness and is day-to-day. Ronny Cedeno will replace him.
Murphy said he woke up sore and doesn’t expect he’ll be out of the line-up for any significant length of time.
When you look back on 2012, Murphy’s development at second base has been one of the positives.
* The 2013 schedule was released today and the geniuses in MLB scheduled the Mets and Yankees to each open their season at home on April 1. The Mets will play San Diego while the Yankees play Boston. Speculation is the Red Sox-Yankees game will be moved to Sunday night to accommodate ESPN. That Sunday falls between the NCAA Final Four and Championship game.
When you come to think about it, MLB should take advantage of that Sunday for Opening Day when the sports schedule is pretty much vacant. Opening Day in baseball used to be a special day when it owned the schedule. Now, only the NFL has an opening night where it corners the market in the schedule.
Aug 29

A Lot To Like About Matt Harvey, Who Doesn’t Remind Us Of Mike Pelfrey

It is premature to say Matt Harvey will surpass Dwight Gooden and become one of the Mets’ career aces. Even so, there’s a lot to like about him, which we can enjoy watching tonight in his start at Philadelphia.

HARVEY: A lot to like. (AP)

Harvey is already in the Mets’ history books with 43 strikeouts through his first six starts. That’s an average of seven a game – and only once did he work past the seventh – is indicative of potential dominance. If he gets nine strikeouts tonight, he’ll pass Gooden’s mark of 51 strikeouts in his first seven games, set in 1984.

Harvey’s money-pitch is a high fastball that has hitters wailing in the air. Harvey has shown an ability to “climb the latter,” and the higher he gets in the strike zone the harder it is for hitters to resist. It is if the ball is teasing the hitters, saying “swing at me.”

Doing so subsequently enables him to so far be effective with his secondary pitches. That’s something Mike Pelfrey has been unable to consistently master. It has been a small sample, but Harvey is ahead of Pelfrey at a similar stage of their careers. Who knows? He might already be ahead of Pelfrey.

There are all kinds of numbers to measure a pitcher’s dominance, and ESPN posted hitters are batting .085 (6-for-71, 43 strikeouts, 10 walks) when Harvey gets two strikes. That’s slamming the door.

The inability to put a hitter away when the count is in the pitcher’s favor has been something Pelfrey, John Maine – he burned out quickly – Bobby Parnell and a few others haven’t been able to master.

Harvey’s emergence makes it more and more unlikely the Mets will re-sign Pelfrey, who is making $5.68 million this season while on the disabled list. Knowing that number would be the bottom of what the tight-fisted Mets would pay, and with Harvey and a few others knocking at the door, strongly suggest the Mets will walk away.

 

Jul 02

Josh Thole To Talk With Buster Posey?

Very interesting note from ESPN this morning. Mets catcher Josh Thole said if Giants and NL All-Star catcher Buster Posey doesn’t contact him, he’ll reach out to him to give tips on how to catch knuckleballer R.A. Dickey.

Too bad Dickey can’t bring his own catcher.

It’s a great gesture by Thole, and one that shouldn’t be underestimated. We know it’s silly, but the winning league gets home field for the World Series. Yes, that’s easily one of baseball’s most inane rules. But, it is a rule, and it could come back to bite the NL.

Suppose for a moment the NL loses by a run, with that run being scored on a passed ball by Posey with Dickey pitching. Would kind of stink wouldn’t it?

So, the call could be worthwhile.

Of course, the best line I ever hear about catching a knuckleball came from Ball Four, when Jim Bouton wrote, “let the ball stop rolling then pick it up.”

 

Jun 08

The Great Mets, Yankees And Fan Debate

I was debating what to write about Mets-Yankees this weekend and was coming up dry. I despise interleague play, but you already knew that. It is unfair, and I’ll get into that later.

I thought about writing this weekend being a make-or-break series for the Mets, but the other day I mentioned its importance as part of a longer stretch of games, and didn’t want to run those bases again. Afterall, it is only three games, and unless they were playing the Yankees the last weekend of the season to get into the playoffs, what is the use?

Basically, that last one is of several fundamental flaws of interleague play. I’d rather watch Mets-Padres, Mets-Reds or Mets-Nationals than Mets-Yankees. Afterall, those games somehow matter more when it comes to sorting out who gets into the playoffs.

I recently had surgery so I’m pretty much still confined to the house, and with daytime TV being one of the Eight Miserable Wonders of the World (however, I would like to see a re-run of the Odd Couple, Get Smart or WKRP in Cincinnati) I thought I’d scan the Internet.

Went on the ESPN site and started to read this article on whether who has it better, Mets or Yankees fans? Lame with no real answer. OK, if the criteria was World Series titles or Hall of Famers, it is no contest. There is none because the Mets have been around half as long as the Yankees.

Then again, what does a team’s success or failures have anything to do with its fans? It’s not like two neighbors deciding to join different country clubs, with one clearly having the better pool.

Everybody has their reasons why they cheer one team over another. When you start pulling for a team when you’re eight years old, I doubt history has much to do with it. There’s logistics, growing up in the same area as your team. Maybe it was a player you started to follow. It could be anything. Perhaps your father liked that team, so you did the same.

Then again, if your dad followed the Yankees, maybe you cheered for the Red Sox. Of course, those could be deeper issues.

There aren’t any stedfast rules to cheering, but here’s one that seems pretty safe: You can’t cheer for both the Yankees and Mets. I don’t put much stock into cheering for both because you cheer for New York. Much like you can’t pull for the Celtics and Lakers, or the Steelers and Ravens. It doesn’t seem right.

A Mets fan is a Mets fans for a myriad of reasons and you have your own reasons why you cheer for them. Same thing for being a Yankees fans. There are Yankees fans of all ages, and yes those of you started following them from 1995 on could get points off for being front runners. You do get bonus points if you saw Horace Clark played.

If you are a Mets fan, you know disappointment, but that doesn’t always translate to being a “deeper,” or “greater” fan. I never bought into the saying as being a “diehard,” or “long-suffering,” Mets fan. If you’re a true fan, you don’t die with your team because die denotes permanence.

True fans are those who hung around with the Celtics being blown out last night and chanting “Let’s go Celtics.” If was an inspiring moment. And, long-suffering doesn’t cut it, either, because while there’s disappointment, if you really suffered, you wouldn’t be a fan of that team in the first place.

Only a masochist would choose to suffer.

I don’t know how this season, or this weekend for that matter, will turn out. But, a third of the way through this summer being a fan of the Mets has been rewarding and fun.

And, I’m happy for you.