Nov 22

Mets Likely To Pass On Cespedes

There is no way of knowing for sure, but the Mets likely don’t get to the World Series without Yoenis Cespedes.

He definitely has a “Wow!’’ factor about him evidenced by his 17 homers and 44 RBI in his two months with the Mets. He also has a laser for an arm and an ability to track a ball in center.

CESPEDES:  Don't count on his return. (Getty)

CESPEDES: Don’t count on his return. (Getty)

His agencies – Creative Artists Associates and ROC Nation, run by rapper Jay-Z – put together a 100-page coffee table style book titled “52 Reviews’’ for his uniform number featuring his stats, testimonials and a built-in disc player to highlight his greatest plays.

“It’s not the only piece to the puzzle,’’ said Brodie Van Wagenen, the lead agent in Cespedes’ negotiations, told ESPN that packaging is part of the process. “Most everyone has access to the information, but the way in which you sort the information and tell the story and define the player is an art form that’s unique from agent to agent. It’s not just the packaging.

“I think this book highlights and reminds teams of what Yoenis Cespedes’ rare skill set is. Instead of his agents telling people how good he is, teams can see it for themselves and hear it from unbiased, third-party insiders.’’

Potential suitors won’t see Cespedes’ “Oh No,” moments, such as his botched play in the outfield that lead to an inside-the-park homer, or those teams when he wasn’t always compelled to run out ground balls, or all those swings-and-misses (39 percent of the time) and .319 on-base percentage.

The Mets will make an offer – believed to be of a public relations variety – and there are a handful of other teams needing an outfielder. But, how many of them are willing to offer the six years and $150 million Cespedes’ camp is reportedly seeking?

San Francisco is intriguing, while the Angels, Cardinals, Cubs and Rangers have shown a willingness to spend. The Tigers need an outfielder, but will they go that way again?

Baltimore, Kansas City, Minnesota, Cleveland, San Diego, Cincinnati and Seattle need outfield help, but don’t have a reputation to write checks.

In the case of the Mariners, they won’t do anything unless they can get rid of Robinson Cano’s huge mistake of a contract.

None of these teams are likely to be seduced by the glitter of “52 Reviews.’’ They know all of Cespedes’ pertinent numbers, including his .150 batting average in the World Series and playing with four different teams in his four-year career.

Oh yes, $150 million will also be a telling number.

Nov 16

Syndergaard Fourth In Rookie Voting

Mets pitcher Noah Syndergaard finished fourth in the NL Rookie of the Year voting today behind Chicago’s Kris Bryant (unanimous winner), Matt Duffy and Jung Ho Kang. The only Mets who realistically have a chance at winning postseason awards are Terry Collins (manager) and Sandy Alderson (executive).

ESPN, citing the Pace Law School in White Plains as its source, projects Matt Harvey to make $4.4 million in arbitration this winter, Other arbitration-eligible Mets are Lucas Duda, Jeurys Familia and Addison Reed.


Nov 11

Mets Interested In Bringing Back Colon

The Mets are interested in bringing back 42-year-old Bartolo Colon and reportedly the feeling is mutual. It would be great to have Colon back for another year, and not just for the entertainment value.

Colon was 14-13 with a 4.16 ERA, but more importantly, worked 194.2 innings. He tied for the club lead in victories and for the second straight year was the leader in innings pitched.

He also proved to be a rock as a reliever in the postseason. That versatility is what makes him attractive to the Mets for a third season.

With Zack Wheeler not expected back until July, either Colon or Jon Niese can be the fifth starter, and with their bullpen thin in the middle innings he could be valuable in that role, also.

“He is interested in coming back, but he’s going to go out on the market and look and see,’’ assistant GM John Ricco told ESPN at the GM Meetings. “It’s very early, and we really just talked about how happy we were with what he did for us.’’

What Colon did out of the pen was one of the more interesting storylines of the postseason. Over 8.2 innings in seven appearances, Colon struck out seven and gave up two hits.

“He proved in the postseason that he can pitch out of the pen,’’ GM Sandy Alderson said after the playoffs. “Whether he would do that on a full-time basis, or be a swing man/middle guy, or even step into the rotation in the event of injuries, I think we’re still open-minded about the possibility of Bartolo.’’

I can see Colon moving on if he’s determined to remain a starter, but I like that the Mets recognized what the did last season and see that value.




Oct 03

Staub Suffers Heart Attack

Sobering news this afternoon with word Rusty Staub, one of the more popular players in Mets’ history, suffered a heart attack on a United Airlines flight to New York, which had to return to Ireland.

STAUB: At Shea finale. (Getty)

STAUB: At Shea finale. (Getty)

The Mets released the following statement: “Rusty Staub experienced a medical emergency on a flight from Ireland to JFK. The flight was diverted back to Ireland where Rusty is now resting comfortably in a hospital. The prognosis is good and Rusty and his family ask that we respect his privacy during this period. He is in the thoughts and prayers of the Mets organization.”

The 71-year-old Staub played 23 seasons with the Mets, Houston, Montreal, Detroit and Texas. He was inducted into the Mets Hall of Fame in 1986 and remains one of the most popular players in franchise history. Staub is extremely active in various charities, including starting the New York Police and Fire Widows and Children’s Benefit Fund.

Apr 09

Memo To Harvey: Quit Whining And Just Pitch

Matt Harvey is pitching today, and with this event comes the question: Is he more interested in being a New York media darling or a Mets’ star?

It seems that way..

Like everybody else, I was enamored with the possibility of what Harvey could bring to the Mets and whether he could help them become a viable franchise again.

HARVEY: On his throne. (ESPN)

HARVEY: On his throne. (ESPN)

The operative word is “help,’’ because not one player can do it by himself, which I say because Harvey seems to be separating himself from the “common folk,’’ who are his teammates.

However, he comes off as someone not interested in the collaborative effort – that he knows best – but who rather marches to his own beat. So be it when you have the track record to back it up, but he has only 12 victories in the major leagues.

He is “potential over proven commodity,’’ which makes his threat for people to judge him by his pitching and not his off-the-field life laughable.

That’s hard to do because Harvey throws his off-the-field life into our faces on a regular basis, whether it be posing nude for ESPN; arguing with the front office where to do his rehab; letting himself be photographed in public kissing models or taking them to see the Rangers; or disregarding the perception of being seen at a Yankees game to watch Derek Jeter.

That didn’t go over well with management and some of his teammates, but he doesn’t care. He also doesn’t acknowledge his own recklessness of trying to pitch through obvious pain and not reporting the discomfort in his forearm could have contributed to his elbow injury.

Apparently, making that start in the All-Star Game was more important than anything else.

Take a look at his smirk in the accompanying photograph. Who, but somebody with a huge ego would allow himself to be photographed that way?

No, we don’t see the effort behind-the-scenes of his workouts and conditioning, but we do hear about his off-the-field exploits of wanting to bed as many women as Jeter and his clubbing and drinking.

Good for him. Joe Namath, Walt Frazier and Mickey Mantle were New York media icons, but had the accomplishments to back it up. Harvey has won 12 games.

In the end, the nightlife killed Mantle and destroyed the playing careers of Darryl Strawberry and Dwight Gooden. It is also part of why the Mets didn’t bring back Jose Reyes.

However, Harvey is young and walks with the attitude “it won’t happen to me.’’

But, it can. The questions are “when’’ and “where.’’ Will it be in Queens or the Bronx as a Yankee? Crosstown, it seems, is where he really wants to be.

At least, that’s the perception, not that he wants to be a star with the Mets, who by the way, are his employers who have the right to judge him.

Sure, I’m all for honoring Harvey’s diva-like demand to judge him on his pitching. OK,  then just shut up and pitch and don’t distract us with the other stuff.