Sep 25

Alderson: Swing And A Miss

Yesterday, I looked at GM Sandy Alderson’s best moves with the Mets. Today, I’ll examine some of his worst decisions, of which there have been more than a few.

Not every decision will work, but here are his swings-and-misses:

INACTIVITIY IN THE OFFSEASON AND TRADE DEADLINE: Several big names have come and gone without Alderson taking a whiff during his tenure. However, it must be remembered the decision not to spend big bucks came from the Wilpons. Quite simply, for the most part he was following instructions. Still, there have been several middle-tier free agents that might have helped such as Jason Marquis.

ALDERSON: Not everything went perfectly.

ALDERSON: Not everything went perfectly.

FAILURE TO BUILD BULLPEN: Alderson’s primary building objective since his arrival was to build a bullpen. It hasn’t worked out, although this year’s pen – if kept intact – has the potential to be good. They finally settled on a role for Jenrry Mejia and he’s developed into a quality closer.

Arguably, one of Alderson’s best pick-ups – and I should have mentioned this yesterday – is Carlos Torres. Jeurys Familia, Vic Black, Rafael Montero and Josh Edgin comprise a quality core with a lot of potential. Still, it took up to three years for Alderson to get the bullpen going in the right direction.

THE OUTFIELD:  Remember when Lucas Duda, Mike Baxter and Jordany Valdespin were in the outfield? Players have come and gone but Alderson has never put together a good outfield. At least, for the next few years he’ll have Juan Lagares and Curtis Granderson. But, there’s still a hole in left field.

CHRIS YOUNG: Paying $7.25 million for one year for a .200 hitter. Yes, that’s what he did. He was hoping to strike lightning in a bottle, but he could have taken that gamble for half that amount.

IKE DAVIS: Alderson tried the patience route far long with first baseman Ike Davis. Last season never should have happened.

JORDANY VALDESPIN: Alderson finally did the right thing, but Alderson should have cut ties with him last summer. You don’t let that kind of that distraction fester on a team trying to adapt a new culture.

NOT PUSHING THE ENVELOPE WITH THE INJURED: Matt Harvey and David Wright, to name two, were those who played while injured and subsequently missed the rest of the season. Particularly Wright has persisted and play through injuries.

 

Mar 08

Harvey Pushes Envelope Again On Twitter; Wants To Pitch This Year

Who wouldn’t like to see Matt Harvey return to the New York Mets this season? Despite words of caution from his doctors, Mets management and even opponents such as Washington’s Stephen Strasburg, Harvey seems bent on wanting to pitch this season.

This morning, Harvey used Twitter and wrote: Harvey day will happen.

HARVEY: Wants to pitch. (Getty)

HARVEY: Wants to pitch. (Getty)

Every time I hear from Harvey about wanting to pitch this year I’m not overwhelmed by excitement as much as I am apprehension as it is never good to force an injury.

Strasburg warned Harvey through the media to take his time in his rehab, and to not look too far into the future. Strasburg said to treat his rehabilitation in chunks, and measure progress not in daily increments because there will be setbacks.

Right now we’re in March and Harvey is throwing four times a week, and off flat ground – currently 20 throws at 60 feet.

The Mets have a rough timetable at best for Harvey, because they’ve accepted the possibility of setbacks. Above all, the next step is contingent on how he responds to the last one.

Meanwhile, Harvey is forecasting what he wants to happen in September, giving the impression he’s oblivious to the rigors and grind of the rehabilitation process.

There are times he appears to pay lip service to this, for example, when he threw for the first time on Feb. 22, he said: “I’ve got a lot of work to do. It’s going to be a tough process [even] with how things felt today. But I’ve got to stick with it and move forward.’’

At the time, Harvey acknowledged his competitive nature and conceded, “I always wanted to push more.’’

When he does that, he fast-forwards months, making him vulnerable to pride and ego.

Don’t think it can’t happen?

Earlier this week, former Met Johan Santana, signed a minor league contract with Baltimore. It was only last spring when Santana disregarded a throwing program the Mets formatted and in a fit, responding to comments made by GM Sandy Alderson, threw off the mound and aggravated his shoulder injury.

He never threw another pitch for the Mets, but did collect all of the $137.5 million owed him.

Santana wasn’t cautious, and let his pride get the better of him. Will the same happen with Harvey? Nobody knows, including Harvey.

If the Mets lay down the law and say Harvey won’t pitch this year regardless, then that might be the thing to do. It would eliminate the risk.

Because, the way it sounds, if left unchecked Harvey might just push the envelope too far and never have the opportunity to sign a $137.5 million contract.

That would be a shame, because it would mean the career we all hope to enjoy will not have come to pass.

 

Jan 14

Jan. 14.10: The Mets should have done better all around.

Yes, I understand about wanting the third opinion. But after thinking about it, so what?

It was reported the Mets knew of Beltran’s condition, otherwise they wouldn’t have sent workman’s compensation paperwork to the physician. And, if what the Mets are saying is true, that they were monitoring this all along, they should have pushed the envelope on surgery in December to give Beltran a chance to be ready.

The first sign of pain should have been met with action.

There were reports this summer Beltran might have needed surgery, but they chose to wait, which was a disaster. This is something that could have been done in September and if so wouldn’t be an issue today.

The Mets also look bad in how they handled their response. They should have said they were on-board with the surgery inside of airing their dirty laundry this way. Saying they knew all along but were kept out of the loop at the end doesn’t ring well at all.

In how they handled this makes them look sloppy and inept. There’s now finger pointing and talk of legal action. Who wins here? Certainly not the Mets, who have simply aggravated their best player. And, certainly not Beltran, who’s in a cast right now.