Jan 29

Mets Need To Find Out About Smith And Not Gonzalez

Do you remember last season when the talk surrounding the Mets was why weren’t they bringing up Dominic Smith?

SMITH: Give him a real chance. (AP)

SMITH: Give him a real chance. (AP)

They didn’t because the Mets already had a first baseman; because they still thought they had a chance to compete; and, most importantly, they didn’t think he was ready for prime time.

Well, they traded Lucas Duda; the injuries mounted and their season spun out of control; they finally brought up Smith and GM Sandy Alderson was correct – or partially so.

Smith, supposedly a defensive wizard, was erratic in the field. He hit with more power than expected, but his average and on-base percentage were worse than expected, and his attitude and conditioning weren’t what the Mets hoped.

Based on Smith’s limited window the Mets don’t believe he’s ready. Hopefully, Smith learned from last summer and rededicated himself and this might be the year he finds his game.

But, barring a dramatic turn, it won’t be in Flushing as the Mets for the start of this season at least are committed to Adrian Gonzalez. I would have preferred the Mets opened the season with Smith and given him a shot to live up to the expectations. With the Mets not anticipated to contend this year, this would be the perfect opportunity to see what the Mets have in the prospect.

Seriously, would Gonzalez put the Mets over the top? Of course not, and neither would Smith regardless of how well he plays this year.

But, the most important thing regarding Smith is to get an idea of what the Mets have in him. And, playing Gonzalez would only set the Mets back at least a year.

Just a ridiculous decision by Alderson.

Jan 10

Bruce Agrees With Mets

I am pleasantly surprised, no, make that floored the Mets finally signed a free agent, and glad it was outfielder Jay Bruce. Primarily, because I didn’t want to see him traded in the first place.

Multiple media outlets reported Bruce agreed to terms on a three-year, $39-million contract. The deal is pending a physical and it is not immediately known if it contains a no-trade clause. Presumably, it does considering the Mets had previously dealt last year for minor league pitcher Ryder Ryan.

The Mets acquired Bruce, now 30, from Cincinnati in 2016. He struggled with the Mets initially but found his stroke in late September. I never bought into the nonsense that he was overwhelmed by New York, and proved that with 29 homers with the Mets before GM Sandy Alderson’s fire sale last season.

Bruce finished 2017 with a career-high 36 homers and 101 RBI in 146. He also hit two homers with four RBI in the AL Division Series.

I’ve always liked Bruce, but don’t think he’ll make the Mets appreciably better unless they are willing to make additional moves. Bruce is scheduled to make $13 million this year, which is only slightly more than the $10 million they were reportedly believed to have budgeted for 2018.

Initial speculation had Bruce seeking $80 million over four years, but there was little interest outside of the Mets, who as of last week hadn’t made an offer. Outside of familiarity, also tipping the needle in favor of the Mets is willingness to play first base in case things don’t pan out with Dominic Smith.

With Yoenis Cespedes and Michael Conforto recovering from injuries, the outfield is considered to be a need.

Jan 08

This Is What I Hope For From The Mets

It’s ten degrees outside and there’s a foot of snow outside and the Mets, of course, are doing nothing for me to take my mind off of what has been the most dismal of winters. They’ve done nothing to encourage hope for this summer. Seriously, they’ve done zero to make me feel optimistic about the season, but that doesn’t mean I’m not looking forward to Opening Day and the six months following.

It will be baseball season, and for that alone, I’m anxious to see what happens. While the future is a mystery, what I want to see unfold is another thing. Here’s what I’m rooting for:

* For Mickey Callaway to get it early and miss the bumps that derail most first-year managers.

* That Dave Eiland‘s off-season throwing program produces some immediate and tangible results.

* That David Wright‘s recovery program takes. To see him charge and barehand a slow roller and fire a seed to first, then come to the plate a line a gapper to right-center and leg out a double.

* I can’t wait to see Jacob deGrom go nine. Hell, I hope he goes nine lots of times and this year he wins 20 and starts the All-Star Game. Basically, I’d like to find out if he can still pitch with the new haircut.

* That Noah Syndergaard‘s lat gives him zero problems and he pitches the way comic book heroes are supposed to pitch.

* That all that I’ve heard this winter are true. That Matt Harvey is in great shape. I’ve never cared to hear about what supermodels he is dating, but that he’s happy. Seriously, I do.

* That Steven Matz and Zack Wheeler come back sound, and the Fabulous Five make it through the cycle at least once. Maybe two or three times.

* That GM Sandy Alderson’s trades last year for bullpen help pay off and some of these arms pan out.

* That maybe Travis d’Arnaud and Kevin Plawecki form a productive platoon.

* That Dominic Smith shows up in shape and hits line drives.

* For Asdrubal Cabrera plays a solid second, or third. Hopefully at second and the Mets find their third baseman in Wright. I can’t help it, I like the guy and hope he makes it back.

* For Amed Rosario to hit .300 and steal 30 bases.

* For Yoenis Cespedes to prove me wrong … stay healthy and hit 35 dingers.

* For the bulked-up Juan Lagares hits up to his glove.

* Michael Conforto‘s shoulder to hold up and he comes back soon and he posts MVP-type numbers. Big ones.

Of course, I would love to see the Mets win the World Series, obviously against the Yankees. But, I would settle for them to be competitive and play the way we all hope.

Dec 26

Handling Of Lagares Illustrates True Mets’ Dysfunction

Because the Mets are willing to trade Juan Lagares – despite the health concerns with Michael Conforto and Yoenis Cespedes – further underscores the dysfunction of the Wilpon ownership and their lieutenant GM Sandy Alderson.

LAGARES: Another dysfunctional move. (Getty)

LAGARES: Another dysfunctional move. (Getty)

That the Mets signed Lagares to a five-year, $23.5-million contract in the first place based purely on potential was a reasonable idea gone bad because they never gave him a chance play fulltime and develop his stroke and plate presence.

Alderson gave him that contract, and yet didn’t let him play. When Lagares eventually played injuries forced him out of the lineup. Now, with Lagares presumably healthy, they are willing, perhaps even eager, to trade him to free up payroll despite their outfield holes.

Is this something an organization committed to winning does?

Ideally, since the Marlins are in a selling mode, I’d like for them to pursue Christian Yelich, but that’s just a pipe dream. So are Lorenzo Cain and Jarrod Dyson.

In the Mets’ dream world, they would like to deal Lagares’ $6-million 2018 contract and spend the savings on Jay Bruce, who’ll they’ll also play at first base because they don’t have faith in Dominic Smith.

Then, because their farm system is barren, they can deal Smith. Basically, it’s paying your VISA bill with a cash advance from American Express.

Reportedly, Alderson will have only $10 million to transform this team that finished 22 games below .500 into a contender. And, don’t forget this is a team with holes at first, second and third, the outfield, and in the rotation.

Oh, and they’ll need another reliever if they deal AJ Ramos’ $9-million contract.

And, you guys wonder why I am negative about Alderson and this team at times?

Nov 30

Mets’ Smith Responds To Criticism About Weight

If there has been a positive to the Mets’ uneventful offseason, it has been Dominic Smith’s response to criticism he was out of shape this summer. Reportedly, Smith has lost 12 pounds, admitted he underperformed and said he was determined to get better.

SMITH: Watching his weight. (AP)

SMITH: Watching his weight. (AP)

All positive developments. Now, it doesn’t mean the Mets won’t consider other options, but perhaps it will make them think twice before they leap. If you’re looking to save money, which the Mets are, a platoon of Smith and Wilmer Flores makes more sense than going after Carlos Santana, who’ll cost plenty but won’t put them back into the playoffs.

“This is something I want to get under control and never make an issue again,’’ Smith told The Post about his weight. “I would rather go through this at 22 than go through this in my prime.

“They drafted me in the first round, so they expect me to be a first-round type player. They expect me to be a star in New York City. Of course, I didn’t live up to the expectations, and I am not going to take that and am upset about that. I know my capabilities and what I’m able to do. I am just going to put it all together and I am going to show the world.

“I definitely have a different mindset coming into next season. I am working my butt off every day continuously and I’m just working. I learned a lot. I got up there for six weeks and I learned from that and I am not taking anything for granted. It’s an honor and pleasure. Every day I get to wake up and play for the New York Mets, it’s an honor and pleasure. You know that you have to work hard. You have to be realistic with a lot of situations, so I definitely am.’’

Other than his nine homers in 49 games last summer, Smith did little to distinguish himself. Even so, the Mets finished 22 games below .500 last year and have a myriad of holes that Santana or Logan Morrison or Adam Lind or Jay Bruce won’t be able to fill.

Forty-nine games is not a big enough window to draw any definitive conclusions on whether Smith will be able to become a viable player, let alone be a star. As much as I’d like to see the Mets be a contender next season, I don’t think they will. There are just too many unanswered questions, of which Smith is one.

However, Smith can stop being a question if he’s given a chance to prove himself over a wider window.