Oct 14

Mets Face Daunting, Not Insurmountable Task

They wouldn’t be the Mets if it were easy, now would they? Seriously, how many of you thought the Mets would put away the Dodgers to avoid a Game 5 Jacob deGrom against Zack Greinke showdown?

When the Dodgers gave Clayton Kershaw three runs in the third inning Tuesday night, I pretty much thought it was over. I mean, that game was over, not the NLDS. Not by a long shot.

DeGROM: Wouldn't want any other Mets starter tomorrow. (GETTY)

DeGROM: Wouldn’t want any other Mets starter tomorrow. (GETTY)

As I wrote at the start of this series, I believe the Mets can win this, the next round, and the World Series. I still do, very much so. I’m not ready to let go of the summer and get off this ride, and neither should you.

This is not the time to stew over lost opportunities. Whether or not the Dodgers would have won Game 2 without Chase Utley’s slide isn’t the issue. Frankly, I don’t think Ruben Tejada would have gotten the runner at first anyway, but that’s a moot point.

It’s only fitting this series go down to a final game, and with it, probably a final at-bat. Maybe even extra innings.

The Mets can win because they have deGrom on full rest. This All-Star should win a Cy Young Award before he’s through. The only question is whether he’ll win one before Noah Syndergaard or Matt Harvey. On that note, the Mets should also have Syndergaard available coming out of the bullpen. He’ll be on normal rest.

Although manager Terry Collins said he will not use Harvey, don’t bet against it. Thursday would normally be his between-starts throw day and if Collins needs an out he shouldn’t hesitate. The objective is to win tomorrow and worry about the NLCS later.

Honestly, I have more faith in him, and Bartolo Colon for that matter coming out of the bullpen than I do Tyler Clippard or Hansel Robles or Erik Goeddel.

The only unavailable pitcher should be Steven Matz.

There are no doubts in my mind deGrom can tune out the Game 5 pressures and pitch big. My concerns are the bullpen and dormant bats, both of which have been erratic all summer.

The offense is producing nothing now. Yoenis Cespedes has gone deep, but he’s not attacking Dodger pitching the way he did National League arms in August. Also, David Wright and Lucas Duda are a combined 3-for-27 with 14 strikeouts. That represents a lot of empty at-bats and stranded runners. A few more hits and they could be preparing for the Cubs today.

Certainly a Game 5 against Greinke in Los Angeles is a monster task. But, we can’t think of lost opportunities or not getting the home advantage. That’s over and fruitless. Worrying about that is as pointless as fretting about the high school girlfriend who broke up with you or what happened against the Marlins in May.

If promised the above scenario on Opening Day you would have taken it gladly, no questions asked, and not wanting to string up Utley.

Now, don’t worry, just enjoy history. It has been a terrific series and promises to be so again tomorrow.

Please follow my on Twitter and Facebook.

 

Oct 13

Even In Defeat, Matz Showed He’s Ready For The Big Stage

Steven Matz pitched well enough to win most games, but most games he’s not facing Clayton Kershaw, the game’s best pitcher. One of the things I like most about Mets manager Terry Collins is the confidence he displays in his players. His decision to stick with Matz as his Game 4 starter – despite only six career starts – against Kershaw screamed he had the ultimate confidence.

MATZ: Good, just not Kershaw good. (Getty)

MATZ: Good, just not Kershaw good. (Getty)

The knee-jerk reaction is to say Matz spit the bit in tonight’s 3-1 loss to the Dodgers to send the NLDS back to Los Angeles for the deciding Game 5. Tell me, if I told you Matz would have given up three runs tonight, you would have grabbed it in a second.

“He pitched very good,” Collins said. “He was outstanding. If we get to the next round we have all the confidence in the world in him.”

That’s an awfully big “if.” It’s one thing to beat Kershaw at home. It’s another for them to encore that by beating Zack Greinke on the road. That will be a daunting task.

Collins could have gone with staff ace Jacob deGrom – he said that was on the table had the Mets lost Game 3 – but as it turned out, Matz was a good choice. Remember, this was his seventh Major League start and it was on a national stage. Next year, the Mets are counting on him for at least 30 starts.

Think of the pressure on Matz. He was pitching on national television with a chance to send the Mets to the next round. That’s a lot of pressure on the 24-year-old lefty, especially considering he hadn’t pitched since Sept. 24, that he was coming off an injury, and was trying to match Kershaw pitch for pitch.

It was one bad inning that did in Matz. Adrian Gonzalez drove in the Dodgers’ first run with a bloop single to center, then two more on Justin Turner’s two-run double. That’s two bad pitches he’d like to have back.

“To sum it up, a couple of mistakes hurt me,” Matz said. “I thought I threw the ball good. I just had a bad inning, but against a guy like Kershaw you have to put up zeroes.”

Sure there were nerves, regardless of his pre-game vow to “take the emotions out of it.” Collins had to sense Matz wasn’t snowing him when he looked him in the eye and was told he was ready.

And, even in defeat, Matz showed the baseball world he was ready for this moment.

Oct 12

Harvey Gives Mets What They Needed Most

In what was the most important start of his young career for the Mets, it was clear Matt Harvey did not have his best stuff and only gave them five innings.

Except, Harvey did what the Mets needed him to do most, and that was to persevere and carry his team to the win.

What Harvey also did was not get caught up in all the noise surrounding Chase Utley and retaliation, but instead took care of business.

After Harvey put the Dodgers down in order in the first, Los Angeles came back with three in the second. It looked as if it could be a long night for Harvey, except that was it for the Dodgers.

Harvey labored and his pitch count climbed, but the Dodgers never had a clear shot at him the rest of the game.

Instead, Harvey benefitted from an offense that too many times this season failed to support him.

The Mets came back in the bottom of the second with four. Then Travis d’Arnaud hit a two-run homer and Yoenis Cespedes hit one that should have brought double the winnings on FanDuel.

Manager Terry Collins made the right call when he pulled Harvey when he did because he’ll need him again this fall.

Collins wanted Harvey to start the pivotal Game 3 because that usually is the determining game of a five-game series.

Except in this series, the Mets still must face Clayton Kershaw one more time – they struck out 11 times in that game – and possibly Zack Greinke. There’s still a lot of this series left to be played.

 

Oct 12

Mets NLDS Game Thread

Well, here are, just where we always wanted to be, only we didn’t think there would be so much peripheral tension attached to the Game 3. It’s an electric atmosphere at Citi Field tonight where Matt Harvey tries to put the Mets in the driver’s seat in their NLDS Series against the Dodgers.

In the other dugout, there’s every Mets’ fan favorite villain, Chase Utley, whose violent takeout slide of Ruben Tejada ended his season and put a target on his back like never before.

Harvey has been told not to retaliate with the beanball, and that the best revenge is winning.

It should be a terrific game and I’m hopeful we’ll have great conversation. Thanks.

 

Oct 12

Harvey Must Keep Head About Him While Others Are Losing Theirs

We all know Matt Harvey has a mind of his own, but his mind tonight had better be in sync with Mets manager Terry Collins.

Harvey made veiled threats at retaliation towards Dodgers second baseman Chase Utley for his take out slide that broke Ruben Tejada‘s right leg Saturday night in Los Angeles. Collins wants no part of it.

HARVEY: Must focus on the big prize. (AP)

HARVEY: Must focus on the big prize. (AP)

“Play baseball,” was Collins’ message to Harvey. “Play the game. This is too big a game. We need to not worry about retaliating. We need to worry about winning. The one thing you don’t need to do is get yourself in a situation to put yourself on the bad side. I understand everything that happened.”

That message should apply to all the Mets. No beanballs, no vicious slides.

“As frustrated as we are, as upset as we are, we feel so bad for Ruben, but you know, the one thing we can’t do is cost ourselves a game, and this particular game, because we’re angry,” Collins said. “We can play angry, but we gotta play under control.”

Tonight’s objective is to beat the Dodgers, plain and simple. There should be nothing else on Harvey’s agenda, but considering the innings fiasco, plus being late for last week’s workout, there’s been negative press directed at Harvey.

Until then, Harvey has always been given the benefit of doubt by the New York media and fans primarily because he has been vocal about pitching in the playoffs for the Mets. That all sounds good, but the bottom line is Harvey needs to produce in that scenario.

He gets his chance tonight, and if he’s smart, he needs to heed Collins’ words and just concern himself with the baseball and not the vigilante business.